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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This sounds like a silly question but here is my situation. Due to scheduling I can't let one side of my lacquer dry for a week before turning it over to paint the other side. I can let it sit for about 12-24 hours but that's it.

After that i need to turn the piece over to spray the other side, and then put it on a drying shelf with the newly painted side up.

So my question is, what is the best material to just rest these pieces on while they are drying or I'm spraying the other side?

  • I tried wooden blocks but that creates some pinpoint pressure and I had small pieces of wood stick to the piece.
  • I have read about making a nailboard, but I worry the nails will make dimples in an otherwise smooth finish
  • I could use plastic but I worry it will slow the curing process by restricting air
  • I could put it on a moving blanket but I want to be double sure that it won't somehow attach to the blanket fibers (I cringe at the thought)

thanks!
 

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Sawdust Creator
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I use a nail board...a moving blanket might be ok after 24 hours, I don't know that I'd use one much earlier than tht.
 

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Really underground garage
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Drive a finish nail centered,in each end....rest on sawhorse fixture and spray the whole door in one shot.

Another technique we've used in the past has them hanging from special blocks/sliders that are suspended from barn door tracks.Mounted to ceiling of spray booth,one guy spraying another moves them down the line.These are also completely sprayed in one application,spinning from a centrally mounted screw.

A lot of pro's use these:

http://www.hafele.com/us/products/drying-rack-cabinet-doors.asp

The last one I built was a "touch" heavy duty,haha.It was 3" schedule 40 pipe for the main stand.With 1 1/2" pcs for the "arms".The "X" brace is scaffold braces(change length,changes distance between verts).It has a few hundred ft of lumber on it now,duh.

Built another one one time that rotated on a central axis,merry-go-round style.We chopped it up after the job.

Many ways to accomplish what you're asking.Here,it has more to do with what materials we have laying around....and how the scope of the job dictates the time we invest in building.Good luck.
 

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The problem with lacquer is it may dry enough you can handle it or even sand it but you can't lay it on anything. The finish still has solvents in it and if you lay it on any surface for any length of time the solvents can't escape and will disolve the finish making a mark. If you are working on something like cabinet doors that have European hinge holes they make a clip that you can insert in the cup holes you can hang the doors to dry so you could do both sides in the same day. Myself, I will finish one side and let dry overnight and finish the other side the next day to be sure I don't have an issue with blocking. For sure don't stack the parts together within a week after finishing.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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I've always sprayed tops with 3-4 coats each side in the same day...only time I ever had a problem is when I ran a strap over one the next day for transport.
 

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I use tack strips for carpet that you can buy at Lowe's or Home Depot. They come 4' long, are cheap and work just great.

Jim

 

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Using solvent based lacquer I generally gofor seven to ten coats. The first coat us thinned no more than 10% or less. Each succeeding coat is thinned more. Two days is the most ever needed. I never lay a freshiy sprayed down even though it will usually be dry to the touch in 10 minutes.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks guys!

I'll let you know how it goes. For now going with the carpet tack strip since it's the quickest for me.
 

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I just wrap pieces of scrap wood in white wrapping paper I buy in rolls from Sams Club. I think they refer to it as butcher paper.
I spray solvent based pre-catalyzed lacquer on the back side, let it dry for about 30 minutes and flip it over and spray the tops. I also use nail boards if I have to.
If you have to wait 2 days, something is bad wrong with your lacquer. I spray front and backs in just a few hours total.
I even use masking tape on newly sprayed lacquer surfaces after about 30 minutes.
As for coats, I usually spray my coats about 15 minutes apart. Most modern pre-cat lacquers have a max. build of 5 mils dry. That is usually one sealer coat and two finish coats max.
If you are using nitro cellulous lacquer - that is ancient history.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm using pre-cat and building it up to polish down. Why is 5mils the max? I'm definitely going past that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm using pre-cat and building it up to polish down. Why is 5mils the max? I'm definitely going past that.
wow now, I just did some reading. Sounds like I will be coating then sanding down then coating. Trying to fill the grain w/o going past 4-5 mils!

thanks for the heads up
 

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What wood are you finishing? If you are trying to fill the grain on a wood such as walnut or mahogany with the finish that is the wrong approach. You should fill the grain with a pastewood grain filler before you start sealing and spraying lacquer.
 

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Modela said:
I use tack strips for carpet that you can buy at Lowe's or Home Depot. They come 4' long, are cheap and work just great.

Jim
Ditto' I actually took two 2x3s and attached these strips to one side of each. Then I set them across saw horses.

Mark
 

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I use the caps from water bottles.
 
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