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I'm surprised to see no blade guards in place. Do you generally not use them on your table saws?
I wont answer this because this could possibly be a very popular topic.

I think you should make this a new thread. It might run into a surprising amount of replies.

Just sayin'
 

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I think you should make this a new thread. It might run into a surprising amount of replies.
Excellent point about other types of table saw safety equipment. We're discussing push stick style here. The trend I'm seeing is that one style of push stick doesn't do all things for all woodworkers. There are very useful styles and sizes for the various wood cutting situations.

A power feeder on a table saw isn't a push stick but its a safety device that could also merit a separate thread.
 

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After I cut my thumb almost all the way off I made some changes in the shop. I built an out feed table and aligned and installed my guard on my table saw. Since I do more than 90% ripping I can leave it on pretty much all the time. But I also decided I needed a good push stick so I could try my best to not loose any fingers. I did a Google image search and found this one. I bought two. One with a flat rubber base and one with a V shaped base. Each came with both rubber strips for the bottom. Plus the end piece is spring loaded. The rubber grips wood even without the end piece.
 

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I use the stick laying closest to the table saw, pads on the jointer. The only requirement for the stick is that it be thinner than the dimension being cut.

I don't have any dedicated push sticks, nor would I ever spend the time to make one.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I agree totally, however ....



There are some times when this one works OK, so I have a few like it. The reason it is most dangerous, is that it only allows you to PUSH forward, but not add down pressure. The shoe types with handles do both and both forward pressure and downward pressure are necessary to keep the work flat on the table and to move it forward.

The most difficult rips to manage correctly are narrow strips where you need to control the forward movement and keep them flat on the table. I use a sacrificial one for those and just saw right through it. I make several and I don't care if they chewed up.... better them than my fingers. :smile3:

You can see a few of mine in this photo:



I came up with this "L" fence for making narrow rips based on the Delta Unifence which can be used in two different height positions. Notice the tall position and the low position on the saw above. This lower position allow you to get your push block closer to the blade without having to squeeze it in between the taller fence:
 

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I came up with this "L" fence for making narrow rips based on the Delta Unifence which can be used in two different height positions. Notice the tall position and the low position on the saw above. This lower position allow you to get your push block closer to the blade without having to squeeze it in between the taller fence:
This style might work even better to get a clear path.

 

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where's my table saw?
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How so?

This style might work even better to get a clear path.


That's no different than the fence itself. It's equally tall and there's no better clearance between it and the blade... so I don't get your reasoning.
 

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I haven't mounted a blade guard since high school....

I see some holes in TonyB's design - followed up on that. grabbed the pusher, then traced around my thumb and (other side) forefinger. the right side/forefinger hole is about 1/4 inch closer to the nose - the lengths of thumbs and fingers being different and all that.....

drilled with a Forstner but a spade bit would do.

oh - the wide bottom design is super. made one, luv it!
 

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Not sure I agree

ThIs style actually allows for forward motion, downward motion and sideways motion, using one in each hand works rather well at times, right to the rear, left to the leading end just ahead of the blade.

It is what you get used to using, there is no magic bullet.
 

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This works great for me, especially when ripping thin strips.
I made a few different width feet for it. I can adjust the height, to give down pressure. Ripping thin strips is a breeze, using it.
The big knob, is just a handle.
 

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This works great for me, especially when ripping thin strips.
I made a few different width feet for it. I can adjust the height, to give down pressure. Ripping thin strips is a breeze, using it.
The big knob, is just a handle.
Pirate there is no key into the blue track it just rides on either side of the fence?
 

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I'm surprised at how many people do not use a guard. It seems like the most dangerous thing you can do in a wood shop.
 

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an open blade does present danger.

what is more dangerous is trying to dangle hold the guard up while the saw is running - checking to see if the cut is where is supposed to be.....

in a production environment where a machine is set-up, the throughput measured & checked and then tens/hundreds/thousands of pieces run, a guard should be used.
 

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I'm surprised at how many people do not use a guard. It seems like the most dangerous thing you can do in a wood shop.
I would call myself a novice woodworker even though I am 61 years old and spent a lifetime working in an industrial environment very little of that experience is woodworkers experience. I routinely watch YouTube videos as well as read what others write as part of the learning process. In all the woodworkers videos I have watched I have seen 1, just 1 blade guard in place.
 

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where's my table saw?
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My TS guards are always changing ....

I would call myself a novice woodworker even though I am 61 years old and spent a lifetime working in an industrial environment very little of that experience is woodworkers experience. I routinely watch YouTube videos as well as read what others write as part of the learning process. In all the woodworkers videos I have watched I have seen 1, just 1 blade guard in place.



For a long while I didn't use a guard or a splitter. Then I understood how much a splitter holds the work against the fence to prevent kickback, but I didn't like the guard being in the way. I also wanted some dust collection off the blade, but I've gone away from that, but may come back.

I came up with this simple 1/4" plywood 2 sided friction "guard" to prevent saw dust spitting into my face and to keep my hands away from the blade... at least while it's lowered. On this saw it's a real pain to align the splitter plate with the blade, so it stays as is.
I have a newer 10" Craftsman Hybrid where the riving knife is a snap in system and when I tilt the blade I use that saw.

The ideal guard would be easy to remove and install, have saw dust collection built in, allow visibilty of the blade and be narrow to allow push sticks to pass between the guard and fence without removing it. :thumbsup:
Our member Marv has a cool system. Marv ....?
 

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This works great for me, especially when ripping thin strips.
I made a few different width feet for it. I can adjust the height, to give down pressure. Ripping thin strips is a breeze, using it.
The big knob, is just a handle.
Pirate,
I am unfamiliar with many of the Table Saw modifications, rails, etc.
I don't understand, at all, what I am looking at in your picture. I don't see a "push stick" anywhere. Can you show ... different angles? ... holding parts in your hand? something that gives my an idea of the contraption?

Please.
 

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It's shop built version of the Gripper

This works great for me, especially when ripping thin strips.
I made a few different width feet for it. I can adjust the height, to give down pressure. Ripping thin strips is a breeze, using it.
The big knob, is just a handle.
This unit mounts to a rail sitting on top of the fence, a rectangular style, like a Biesemeyer. That way it can not move side to side only forward or back.




Pirate,
I am unfamiliar with many of the Table Saw modifications, rails, etc.
I don't understand, at all, what I am looking at in your picture. I don't see a "push stick" anywhere. Can you show ... different angles? ... holding parts in your hand? something that gives my an idea of the contraption?

Please.
It works in the same way, using a thin piece of plastic which is slotted for height adjustment, to push the thin workpiece between the blade and fence... NO separate push stick.

The Gripper is shown here, but there are many configurations you can assemble to do different operation. It allows forward and downward pressure simultaneously.


 
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