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Let's talk about push sticks. Are some styles safer than others?

What style do you use? Did you make your own?

Share a picture if you would like! :smile3:



Credit: Topic and image provided by Tony B
 

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I use the shoe type of push sticks that are 12"-13" long, with the handle about a third of the way from the operators end of the shoe. I also use the saddle type that rides on the fence for ripping 5/16" or less. I prefer the shoe type because it holds the stock down along the length of the stock, and prevents my hand from slipping down towards the blade.
I make my own.
 

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I make my own. I dont worry about them getting chewed up. Every time I have scrap plywood, I simply make more.

I have them in several different sizes and widths. The wider ones are for Dado cuts. I prefer a simple flat shape, tall enough to keep my fingers away from the blade. I dont like wrapping my fingers around anything, like a saw handle shape. Afraid of fingers getting moved if I get a kick-back. Would rather have the pushstick sent into orbit while moving my fingers out of the way.

I feel like the long skinny shape does not give much control of the workpiece although it is probably the most popular style

I hang them from my table saw so they arev always handy.
 

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Like TonyB, I think the red popular store bought push stick is the most dangerous woodworking item on the market. It put pressure on the back of the work piece and tends to lift the front causing kickback. I still keep this one hanging near my band saw if I need to push something out of the way.

I prefer the thin long nose stick pictured below. It's cut from 1/2 inch plywood, the handle is as high as I want to make it and the long nose lets me put pressure on the front of the piece. I own an expensive "GRIPPER" but I don't like it around the table saw because I'm afraid of the blade catching it and twisting my hand down onto the blade. The "GRIPPER" is great for the jointer and router table.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I'm building guitars so I made a guitar shaped push stick out of Walnut - seemed appropriate :thumbsup:

That's cool, but where's the sound hole? :wink2:
must be an electric.
 

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where's my table saw?
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OK, then.

I'm an acoustic guy all the way but I didn't want a sound hole interfering with my push stick. ;)
You could call it a "pick up" hole which would allow you to pick it up more easily.... just sayin' :wink2: It would allow you to insert your fingers to better control it also. DAMHIKT. :grin:
 

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I have and use thr gripper on my table saw often. It's not what I always reach for but when the pieces are small or short, or if I'm concerned about the piece rising the gripper is the best/safest I have found .. Every time I use it I think to myself I really appreciate this tool. I highly recommend it
 

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You could call it a "pick up" hole which would allow you to pick it up more easily.... just sayin' :wink2: It would allow you to insert your fingers to better control it also. DAMHIKT. :grin:
Now that's funny!! I may make another one and add some detail, maybe engraving for sound hole, fingerboard, frets, strings, bridge, etc. Of course, it might be that I wouldn't want to risk it hitting blade and won't use it - :eek:
 

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Like TonyB, I think the red popular store bought push stick is the most dangerous woodworking item on the market. It put pressure on the back of the work piece and tends to lift the front causing kickback. I still keep this one hanging near my band saw if I need to push something out of the way.

I prefer the thin long nose stick pictured below. It's cut from 1/2 inch plywood, the handle is as high as I want to make it and the long nose lets me put pressure on the front of the piece. I own an expensive "GRIPPER" but I don't like it around the table saw because I'm afraid of the blade catching it and twisting my hand down onto the blade. The "GRIPPER" is great for the jointer and router table.
I have a Grripper, too, and agree, they're better suited for the router table, as they can't be used with the blade guard in place.... I do use the 1/8 inch leg for cutting strips....
This is the old pusher I've used for over 50 years.....
 

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I keep a collection of shop made ones above my table saw. Some are long, some short, some have a big lug, some have a short one for 1/2" stock, most are grooved to some degree or another. When the lug gets too ratty, I'll rip down and put a new lug on. These things last for decades and keep my hands way above the blade. They also help kicking wood away from the blade. The long ones are really nice on the jointer for short stock. when the blade gets into the wood, all is fine. Plastic has a way of shattering and projecting hard projectiles back.


Existing photo, but you can see the sticks hanging from the ceiling. This is a design I think I got from the back of a 1970s Brodhead-Garret catalog.


The solid handle makes a significant difference. I've tried to get around the hand hole by just cutting it away. Its not the same and no where as rigid for the control you need. A 3/8 round over hand router bit makes quick work of making the grip area comfortable.
 

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I see someone here is fully armed.
Safety is something that should not be taken lightly.
 
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