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where's my table saw?
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large construction grade boards?

Do you want to reduce the thickness on the face? OR do you want to reduce the width by planing then on the edge? 2 X 6's are 1 1/2" on the edge, and 5 1/2" on the face, so that's the widest board you can plane on "edge". A 12" capacity lunchbox planer will thickness plane a 2 X 12" board on is face easily...however, you probably don't want to run that unit all day long planing that wide of a board. You will burn out the machine. :thumbdown:

Lunch box style planes are not designed for heavy duty continuous use. So it depends on the width, depends on how many, may even depend on the type of wood. If the wood has a lot of sap, it will get stuck to the feed rollers and they will have to be cleaned often.

For "industrial use".... many wider boards, long lengths running for hours at a time, I would use a 3 HP stationary planer with metal feed rollers to avoid maintenance issues.
 

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unless you build a sled a planer will not take the bow out of a board it will only make the two sides parallel. What are you building that you want to use construction lumber and why does it need to be flat?
 

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A small planer will work fine if you don't have to run too many at one time. They will overheat if you run it continiously. The little planers will work better for taking out a cup warp. Some of the larger ones the feed rollers are under so much pressure sometimes the rollers will flatten the wood and it comes out the other side will warp back where the little planers with the rubber rollers will just surface the high places.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
unless you build a sled a planer will not take the bow out of a board it will only make the two sides parallel. What are you building that you want to use construction lumber and why does it need to be flat?
You probably think I meant taking out the bow lengthwise. I actually meant I wanted to take out the bow across it's width on both sides.

A small planer will work fine if you don't have to run too many at one time. They will overheat if you run it continiously. The little planers will work better for taking out a cup warp. Some of the larger ones the feed rollers are under so much pressure sometimes the rollers will flatten the wood and it comes out the other side will warp back where the little planers with the rubber rollers will just surface the high places.
What is cup warp?
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Nope....we understand you. A planer forces the board down against the bed as it feeds it through, which especially in softer and thinner woods will flatten it, but not remove the cup ( or warp as your referencing)
 

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This is a cup warp. I have a little 12" Delta planer and it will flatten a board like this. The feed rollers are not strong enough to force the board flat. All I would have to do is run it with the crown side up and it would shave the crown flat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK yeah, cup warp is exactly what I was referring to.

Steve, are you saying that a small planer is capable of taking the cup warp off both sides?

If I understood Ryan's post correctly, he's saying it's not possible.
 

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I think the key is light passes. Don't remove more than 1/32" in a pass and it can fix the board, if the cup is uniform throughout the board length. Set the height based on the thickest part of the board, or the part that's warped the most. If the cup increases as the board goes through the planer, the planer could force the board down as suggested. But really, I think this is what a jointer is designed for.
 

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OK yeah, cup warp is exactly what I was referring to.

Steve, are you saying that a small planer is capable of taking the cup warp off both sides?

If I understood Ryan's post correctly, he's saying it's not possible.
I think any of those portable planers would do it but all I could swear to is mine. It's a Delta 22-560. Most of the experience I have had with planers is with professional grade powermatic planers. They have steel infeed and outfeed rollers that have considerable pressure on them. When you run a board through the rollers tend to flatten the board out while it is being surfaced and when it comes out the other side will bow again so on those planers it's not possible. The planer I have has rubber rollers with barely enough pressure on them to pull the board through. If you run the crown side up it will take the crown off. Depending on how much of a crown it has may take more passes but will flatten that side. Then once you have that side flat turn it over and flatten the other side. On a 2x6 you might end up with a board that is 1 3/16 to 1 1/4 thick before you get it cleaned up. Now if you were trying to flatten a 1x12 that probably wouldn't work. The board is too soft, too thin and too wide to do this.
 

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You can take the cup warp off with a jointer?

I thought a jointer was only for the sides of the board...
Yes a jointer is commonly used for this purpose. Sometimes when I'm making an entry door I would purchase the wood rough sawn for the stiles because the boards may be bowed lengthwise as well as have a cup warp. You can run one face of a board cutting just the middle of the board or the ends so you can get it straight as well as flat. Then send the wood through a planer for the final thickness.

It wouldn't be practical to flatten construction lumber especially if you are working with 12' lengths. You might be able to take the cup warp out but it wouldn't be of uniform thickness unless it was also sent through a planer. Usually if you try to surface 2 sides of a board on a jointer you end up with a board that is 1/16" thicker on one side of a board as the other.
 
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