Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a newbe trying to get into woodworking. Some projects that I plan on getting done include a small entertainment center, desk for bills, laptap, books, etc, and a toy chest. There's others but these are the main ones.
I have an old circular saw that works pretty well and a router, some clamps. I'm sure what I have can do pretty much any of the above projects I mentioned. But I like to make them look professionally done and I know some tools can make things easier. I'm leaning to get a table saw like the Ridgid 4512 from Home Depot. It's gotten a lot of good reviews. I want something that I can move around sence I'm in 24x28 garage. I already have a blast cabinet, large air compressor and our Escape is in the garage only during the winter. A good saw that has good extension, dado compatibility and something that I could build a work center around if I decide to add on to the garage in the future. I've seen some photos of these on the internet and some are amazing. A miter saw is another thing I've looked at but is it necessary? `A sanding table/belt sander is another one that I plan on getting soon. I plan on buying some smaller items to help with drilling certain holes and guides for the circular saw.
Any suggestions are great and excepted. Just looking to see where to begin. What's more important, The miter or the table saw?


Thanks
Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,644 Posts
Andy, a good table saw can be the heart of a good workshop. Make sure you get one that will accept a dado blade. That can come in really handy. Cross cutting and ripping your material can really help your projects along by helping make accurate cuts.

There is a lot of experience on this board and I am sure others will chime in. Do some searching on the internet or You Tube. There are a lot of folks working out of their garage...me included, only it is a one car garage.

Good luck.
Mike
 

·
crosseyed & dyslexic
Joined
·
589 Posts
Table saw hands down. I have the same size space, these tools are portable, full size table saw, 15" planer, 16-32 drum sander, chop saw and router table! These tools are stationary, 17" band saw, drill press, air compressor mortising machine, 6" jointer. Plus my work bench.
You'd be surprised just how much stuff and projects you can accomplish in that space. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Andy, a good table saw can be the heart of a good workshop. Make sure you get one that will accept a dado blade. That can come in really handy. Cross cutting and ripping your material can really help your projects along by helping make accurate cuts.

There is a lot of experience on this board and I am sure others will chime in. Do some searching on the internet or You Tube. There are a lot of folks working out of their garage...me included, only it is a one car garage.

Good luck.
Mike
I've done a lot of research online and learned a quite a bit about table saws the past months. At first I thought about purchasing the Kobalt saw from Lowes which is around $270. The only drawback is I don't believe I could build a workcenter around it in the future. I have a workbench that's about 80% done and a mini drill press. I'm not sold on Craftsman's table saws or the cheap under $200 saws.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
Since you mentioned the Ridgid saw, the Craftsman 21833 is the same as the Ridgid R4512 but has a stronger motor. 15 amp vs. 13 amp. On the Kobalt saw, to me it looks as solid as any portable can get. Seems to be a lot of saw for $279. I'm getting one. I need portability but if not for this I'd probably be up for either of the Craftsman or Ridgid saws. The new Delta at Lowe's looks really nice as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
You didn't mention what you would fasten boards together with. Using a router it's possible to cut several different joints that you could just glue together but even this isn't enough for it all. I'd get a good cordless drill so you can drill holes as well as run screws to fasten joints. Drilling and screwing will also make it possible to add hardware to your items, things like hinges, drawer pulls, knobs, and so on.

There are lots of good quality cordless drills available, and among the ones I've used, the Craftsman brand was by far the best bang for the buck, costing the least, and delivering powerful performance over a long period of time, and taking amazing abuse at times on construction job sites. Currently I'm using two of these in construction (see link below) but I also use them in my wood shop during my off time. You'd love it, they're very light weight, strong, compact, and the batteries last a long time before needing charged. You get two Lithium batteries with this set. Use one, have the other charged and ready.

http://www.sears.com/craftsman-c3-l...p-00935705000P?prdNo=3&blockNo=3&blockType=G3

Recently I've been really impressed with Kobalt tools from Lowe's. I see they've come out with a cordless drill of their own. It's worth checking out, costs 1/2 what the Craftsman does but only has one battery. For that price though you could just get two and have two drills, two batteries, and two chargers, for the same price as one Craftsman. You'd have a spare charger and drill incase something happened to the others. The warranty looks pretty good too, 5 year no hassle guarantee.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_515979-1124...=1&currentURL=?Ntt=cordless+drills&facetInfo=
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,445 Posts
A good TS is the heart of most shops. I would not get a portable unless you need to move the saw from site to site....you give up too many advantages for the sake of portability. Any of the stationary saws can be mounted to a mobile base (some come with one) and rolled easily around the shop.

Some reading might help with your decision.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
knotscott said:
A good TS is the heart of most shops. I would not get a portable unless you need to move the saw from site to site....you give up too many advantages for the sake of portability. Any of the stationary saws can be mounted to a mobile base (some come with one) and rolled easily around the shop. Some reading might help with your decision.
I very much agree with Scott's sound advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
I bought an R4512 as my second big tool purchase behind my sliding compound miter saw. I eventually made a crosscut sled and the miter saw has pretty much collected dust ever since. I really like my Ridgid TS, and it comes with a mobile base that works very well. I would vote for a router after the table saw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Look on craigslist. I got a slammin deal on my table saw with a load of accessories, and all it took was a little elbow grease. If you're a newbie trying to jump in, then you're in the same boat as me. Why by a full price economy saw when you can find used industrial equipment for a fraction of its worth. I see tons of premium brand stuff on there that no one wants. It doesn't have to be pretty, it just has to work, right?
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
Here's the thing. You need a table saw, it's the heart of any shop. Your comment that our not sold on the craftsman brand, but that your looking at the r4512 needs some clarification. Today, just about every brand including craftsman, ridgid, and kobalt are all sourced out of the same Asian factories. For example, the r4512, is the same basic saw as the craftsman 21833, and a master craft model at menards. However the craftsman has a bigger motor, longer cord, arbor lock, different stock blade(only marginally better than the stock ridgid blade), and improved wings.

With any of these brands, you can't discount the entire brand, the craftsman table saws 22116 and 21833 are great saws, their routers are top notch and have been rated well a few times, their c3 line gets decent reviews. That said, their miter saws are so so...as are the kobalt ones....their sanders aren't great....

Don't discount a brand, just because of a few peoples opinions...look and feel the tools, and see if they'll work for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
You really need to think about the materials you want to work with and what is readily available to you. Unless you plan on buying your lumber at the big box stores already planed to size then you will need to be able to break a board down from full size rough sawn state. For most instances your circular saw will be able to get boards broke down. Next you'll need to joint one face and an adjoining edge. You'll either need a jointer or hand planes and a bench for that. Next you'll need a planer make the remaking rough sawn face parallel and smooth in reference to the face that was jointed. Then you can take that piece and cut it to the exact length and width you need. Now from there you could take that piece to a band saw to ad some curve to it. Or you could take it to your router and profile the edges or cut joinery in it. Then you might need to sand it smooth with a good random orbit sander for flat surfaces. A spindle sander can be used to smooth concave curves cut on your band saw and either a disc or belt sander would be used to smooth convex curves. Tools like a drill or even a drill press can be used for joinery before you cut parts to shape, installing hardware and tons of other uses. Your routers potential can be expanded by building a table to mount it in and using it with flush cutting bits to work off templates and for smoothing curves. Don't jump on a tool just because of a good deal, make sure it's going to provide some adaptability down the road. For instance I thought I was getting a great deal on my first 1 3/4hp Craftsman router. Then I found that it only accepted 1/4" bits and wasn't variable speed. I still have it, and the DeWalt that followed it. The DeWalt I use often but the Craftsman hasn't come out of the case in 5 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
I am more of a fan of planes rather than sanding machines. Glass smooth surface and your not stuck buying sand paper. Also I don`t have a table saw in my shop. Considered essential by most but I do my work on a Laguna 14 12 band saw, a floor standing drillpress, miter saw, and a collection of hand tools. I have heard to avoid craftsman due to their tendency to stop making parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks everyone for your advice. I will look into the Craftsman TS. A lot of good info to look at and consider.







Thanks
Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
That said, their miter saws are so so...as are the kobalt ones....
On the 7 1/4" and 10" models of Kobalt miter saws, I'd agree. But the Kobalt 12" SCMS is a fantastic saw. Mine is deadly accurate, easy to operate, and a real pleasure to use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I really enjoy using my ridgid R4512. It's wonderfully accurate. Easy to use and set up. Has plenty of power and is still easy to move around. Can't say enough good things about it. I've used a few table saws but as far as the ridgid its far and away my favorite.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top