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Discussion Starter #1
After hearing about how good plunge saws are, I've decided that I'm going to buy one. But I can't decide what brand to go with dewalt and festool look like the best candidates but just wondering what other people think of there own plunge saw
 

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Most people I have seen use either the Makita or Festool. The dewalt ends up being around the same price as the festool so it makes sense to get the festool.

I went with the Makita since if you catch one of those 10-20% sales you can get the saw with track for <$400. Festool's accessories are also much more expensive.
 

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How does the makita cope with hardwood and fire doors because I've herd that festool can sometimes snuggle when you start plunging
 

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"What plunge saw is truely the best?"

If there was such a thing, they'd all be exactly the same. It's subjective, so there will be multiple correct answers.
 

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How does the makita cope with hardwood and fire doors because I've herd that festool can sometimes snuggle when you start plunging
I have the Festool and have used it several times to trim doors. Not exactly sure what you mean by "snuggle", but mine worked like a charm....you do need to clamp the track down to keep it from sliding on the finished surface. That goes for using it on pre finished plywood as well, the tracks can slide under certain conditions. That said, the Dewalt does have what i think is a big advantage: the bidirectional track. Having to swing those things end-to-end is a PITA.
 

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Sorry i was ment to say struggle instead my apologies
Don't worry about it. It's just the nature of the group here to give you a bad time. It's all good natured fun and this time we're picking on you. Next time you get to pick on us.

To your original question. The real answer depends upon where you are going to use the saw. Out in the driveway or inside that $6 million house? I've observed the Festool being used and dust collection was very impressive but that demo used the Festool shop vac. ($$$)

I don't see why the Festool would struggle any more than other saws when plunging. I would ask for an explanation as to the term "Struggle" and why. Maybe just the operator?

As for the plunge feature, do you really do a lot of plunge cuts?

You asked about hardwood flooring and fire doors. I used a window cutout of a fire door for an out feed table. (Masonite and particle board) It was not difficult to cut at all. So the struggle term doesn't make sense to me.

As for the hardwood floors, I would think that any cross cut would be easier on any type of miter saw. As for the rip cuts for that last piece of flooring, I would feel safer using some sort of a table saw.

You know better than I so get something that your are comfortable using. If you are comfortable with the tool, you will be safer.
 

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When you say 'plunge' saw, do you actually mean tracksaw?

Me and a lot of other guys have been 'plunging' circular saws for years. 60+ in my case, just loosen the base plate screw, hold tight and push!
DON'T DO THAT AT HOME!

But if you're referring to a plunging tracksaw (which they all do), the best is the one that fits your needs divided by budget. If I worked in the trades, I'd have a $1,000.00 Festool & accessories. However, I only break down 4-8 sheet/year + 1 or 2 door bottoms. So I bought a Scheppach (actually bought 3, 2 for gifts) when Woot.com had them for $120.00, including 2 25" rails. Then I bought a pair of 55" rails from Grizzly @ $50.00 ea. I took it over to a friend's shop who has at least one of everything Festool and we tested them side by side. For my use, I have no reason (excuse?) to get a Festool. It's not a Festool, but I'm happy.
 
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