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Exterior front door was previously stained with Varathane Premium Wood Stain...sanding it to prepare it for re-staining. Can anyone identify what kind of wood this is? Thanks!

Brown Rectangle Wood Hardwood Wood stain
 

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Looks like Philippine Mahogany to me, AKA lauan. You may have difficulty staining the door. Generally it's a bad idea to sand the finish off wood. Sanding tends to remove what is on the surface and leaves what is penetrated into the wood. Then when you stain it there can be spots here and there that the wood is sealed with the old finish and won't accept the stain. Anytime you refinish wood it should begin with chemically stripping the wood.
 

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Exterior front door was previously stained with Varathane Premium Wood Stain...sanding it to prepare it for re-staining. Can anyone identify what kind of wood this is? Thanks!
What Steve said is true:
"Looks like Philippine Mahogany to me, AKA lauan. You may have difficulty staining the door. Generally it's a bad idea to sand the finish off wood. Sanding tends to remove what is on the surface and leaves what is penetrated into the wood. Then when you stain it there can be spots here and there that the wood is sealed with the old finish and won't accept the stain. Anytime you refinish wood it should begin with chemically stripping the wood."

Before your expectations go too high, I would restain a small area first to see what it's like.. Stain does not sand "out".
Strippers are typically used to remove the majority of the previous finish and stain and even they don't always work great.
The first step in any finishing or refinishing project is make test samples!
A majority of our finishing posts are "how do I fix this?" If test samples were made there may not even be any questions....
Finishing is part chemistry, part experience and part voo doo. Because of the different chemicals involved, the outcome is rarely predictable.
Were you the person who stained it previously? What was the color of the wood then? A soft reddish brown? Then most likely mahogany.
I've made stain sample boards to help with selecting a stain based on the wood which it's applied on:
Font Rectangle Parallel Wood Newsprint


Wood Gas Font Metal Engineering
 
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What Steve said is true:
"Looks like Philippine Mahogany to me, AKA lauan. You may have difficulty staining the door. Generally it's a bad idea to sand the finish off wood. Sanding tends to remove what is on the surface and leaves what is penetrated into the wood. Then when you stain it there can be spots here and there that the wood is sealed with the old finish and won't accept the stain. Anytime you refinish wood it should begin with chemically stripping the wood."

Before your expectations go too high, I would restain a small area first to see what it's like.. Stain does not sand "out".
Strippers are typically used to remove the majority of the previous finish and stain and even they don't always work great.
The first step in any finishing or refinishing project is make test samples!
A majority of our finishing posts are "how do I fix this?" If test samples were made there may not even be any questions....
Finishing is part chemistry, part experience and part voo doo. Because of the different chemicals involved, the outcome is rarely predictable.
Were you the person who stained it previously? What was the color of the wood then? A soft reddish brown? Then most likely mahogany.
I've made stain sample boards to help with selecting a stain based on the wood which it's applied on:
View attachment 441164

View attachment 441165
What Steve said is true:
"Looks like Philippine Mahogany to me, AKA lauan. You may have difficulty staining the door. Generally it's a bad idea to sand the finish off wood. Sanding tends to remove what is on the surface and leaves what is penetrated into the wood. Then when you stain it there can be spots here and there that the wood is sealed with the old finish and won't accept the stain. Anytime you refinish wood it should begin with chemically stripping the wood."

Before your expectations go too high, I would restain a small area first to see what it's like.. Stain does not sand "out".
Strippers are typically used to remove the majority of the previous finish and stain and even they don't always work great.
The first step in any finishing or refinishing project is make test samples!
A majority of our finishing posts are "how do I fix this?" If test samples were made there may not even be any questions....
Finishing is part chemistry, part experience and part voo doo. Because of the different chemicals involved, the outcome is rarely predictable.
Were you the person who stained it previously? What was the color of the wood then? A soft reddish brown? Then most likely mahogany.
I've made stain sample boards to help with selecting a stain based on the wood which it's applied on:
View attachment 441164

View attachment 441165
I like your wisdom idea. Th
What Steve said is true:
"Looks like Philippine Mahogany to me, AKA lauan. You may have difficulty staining the door. Generally it's a bad idea to sand the finish off wood. Sanding tends to remove what is on the surface and leaves what is penetrated into the wood. Then when you stain it there can be spots here and there that the wood is sealed with the old finish and won't accept the stain. Anytime you refinish wood it should begin with chemically stripping the wood."

Before your expectations go too high, I would restain a small area first to see what it's like.. Stain does not sand "out".
Strippers are typically used to remove the majority of the previous finish and stain and even they don't always work great.
The first step in any finishing or refinishing project is make test samples!
A majority of our finishing posts are "how do I fix this?" If test samples were made there may not even be any questions....
Finishing is part chemistry, part experience and part voo doo. Because of the different chemicals involved, the outcome is rarely predictable.
Were you the person who stained it previously? What was the color of the wood then? A soft reddish brown? Then most likely mahogany.
I've made stain sample boards to help with selecting a stain based on the wood which it's applied on:
View attachment 441164

View attachment 441165
I like your wisdom quote, the one I use is Good judgement comes from experience, most experience comes from bad judgement.
 
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