Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all.

I'm building a small fan enclosure, which will be a box suspended by 1/4" bolts going into its sides through upright legs that extend from a base that sits on the floor. I need the box to be tiltable up and down, so it must pivot on these bolts.

I presume there's some kind of bushing I can line the holes in the upright legs with, so the bolts can pass through and allow pivoting without wearing away the wood. Something like a T-nut, but with a smooth bore, perhaps? Or a bushing with a coarsely threaded exterior but smooth interior and a notch in the end so it can be screwed into the wood with a big screwdriver?

Like this, but without threads inside:


What would you all recommend for this situation?

Thanks!

Gavin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,658 Posts
Could you let us know what the project is. It's difficult to tell what you are doing. It sounds like the part needs to be hinged.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,896 Posts
a well stocked hardware store will have steel, brass and plastic/nylon bushings - or sleeves.

depending on the bolt size, you could make your own from PVC tubing or pipe.

thru bolt and use a nylock type nut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies, guys.

Here's a picture showing what's required. 1/4" bolts will go through the upright legs and into T-nuts on the inside of the box. Knobs on the outside of the legs tighten the legs against the sides of the box (via washers) to secure the position.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
Since you have T-nuts to secure the bolt, all you need is a simple tube that would be captive between the nut and knob. A straight sided bushing would work, no need for it to be threaded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the ideas, guys. Those shoulder bolts are interesting.

I ended up getting some bronze flange bearings, 1/4" ID and 3/8" OD. They jam snugly into a 3/8" hole and will work perfectly for my application.

 

·
Smart and Cool
Joined
·
2,481 Posts
No bushing is necessary, won't hurt to use one, but that narrow range of motion would need to move a lot to produce even a negligible amount of wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,361 Posts
Carriage bolt from inside, washer and threaded knob or wingnut outside. No bushings needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Cool suggestions, thanks. I already have knobs (from the metal fan enclosure that I bashed after it got me out of bed for the third time by rattling) that take 1/4" bolts and will allow me to tighten the fan at the desired angle. I also happened to have 1/4" T-nuts lying around, so it all goes together nicely.

And yes, I realize the wear on the holes in hardwood would be negligible, but it bugs me nonetheless!

I'll post pics when I'm done.
 

·
Senior Sawdust Sweeper
Joined
·
1,561 Posts
Does the motor have a lot of front to back slop in the rotor? Sometimes theres thrust washers inside that can be replaced to bring it back to specs and get rid of noise. The one good thing you have going is the motor still runs. That leaves the bushings and thrust washers if it turns out the motor is the source of the rattle. The motor is not likely to have ball bearings, just bushings, aka journal bearings, pressed into the housing. Sometimes its possible to replace these with fairly low tech procedures. If you have a friend with a metal lathe they can be reproduced in brass or Oilite stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi Gary.

I ordered a new propeller, which I just installed today; it runs pretty quiet and makes the fan usable!

I was always planning to have two crossbars in an X configuration on the back of the fan, to which the motor would be mounted. But when I was assembling the fan, it seemed pretty secure with just one. On powering it up, it oscillates a bit, so I'll install the other bar to stablize the motor and I think all will be well.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top