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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Photo caption Internet meme Movie




Canidae Wood Furniture Fur Guard dog


I'll take some close up pics after work. It's the legs in that bench. It is super heavy and super dense. I have not seen it online or anywhere. I got it from a granite and marble supply company. It was one of their pallets.

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From where does the granite and marble company get their material shipments? That might help you track down the country of origin of the pallet wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The grain is so tight on it that when I applied the poly it took it over a year to darken or change any. When building that bench, I decided to go unplugged and do it all with hand tools. It was all rough sawn. I sharpened my plane irons to 6000 grit. I had to sharpen the after about 2 sides of milling. I had my chisels to 8000 grit. It turned back the edge. Had to re edge and stop at 1500 to keep a more blunt edge. Had to resharpen after every mortise. The consistency was almost rubbery/ gummy. Every leg weighs about 25 lbs so it is really heavy. There was some markings on a part of the pallet that looked Japanese( I served 4 tours in Korea so I can somewhat tell the difference between Korean and Japenese). I haven't seen this on any website, any book. The look of It after final sanding and poly looked whiteish, kind if milky.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am thinking that it may be a type of root or vibe. Upon my research to learn about this wood, I discovered that in Thailand that there is a vine that grows out the side of river banks. This vine has been seen growing as wide as 4 feet. I have gathered from here say that they see this stuff like we see spruce/white wood. That they may use it as pallet material. Due to the gummy/oily characteristics of it I deduce that it is in fact a water species of some kind.

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Trying to figure this out has been a heck if a challenge and has lead to me learning a lot about the characteristics of wood and why it is the way it is. Has been very educational and informative.

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Julie Mor said:
From where does the granite and marble company get their material shipments? That might help you track down the country of origin of the pallet wood.
They get it from all over the world. Every where from the Middle East to Asia, no telling where this was from. Can't really tell by pallet markings due to the fact that it could be customs stamps. So going by that is simply an assumption

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Ok, first go to fellow member phinds website, http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/ to see if you can ID it there. I've turned some mango and it was very hard and dulled tools quickly. Several of the pics look a little like it, but your close ups are just out of focus enough/ bad lighting that it's hard to tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nope, not mango. I held it next to mango side by side. Close but not it. Would make sense a a type of fruit bearing though. Especially since it is so milky and rubbery. The grain is tighter than mango also. I have a piece that is still rough. I am at a golf scramble now but will post an end grain pic later. Also, I have noticed some red and blue throughout the wood. Almost confetti like. Not in the same area of grain every time either. That is another reason why I'm thinking root. Mineral deposits will tend to do that when close to or in soil. I'm telling you it's a mind boggler.

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