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Discussion Starter #1
it would be interesting to know how people got into turning and what their first experiences were like :smile:
how did you start turning?
are you self tough or did you go on a course?
what lathe did you start on? how many lathes have you had?
how long have you been turning?
what was the first thing you turned?


doubt anyone cares but i started turning 6 months ago. my first experience of woodturning was at an outdoor museum, i paid £1 to have a go at using their lathe and i made a bathroom light pull for my grandparents. the shape was a little crude but my grandparents loved it so that's all that matters :)
3 weeks later i was at a village fair and i found an old lathe lying on the floor under a load of car parts, i paid £50 for it and started turning until i realized i needed a chuck. i found a 4 jaw independant chuck at a car boot sale for £5 and my uncles friend rethreaded it to fit my 20 year old lathes headstock thread.
so with my flimsy 20 year old lathe with an independant 4 jaw metalworking chuck i began turning bowls and my knowledge of turning increased until i realised i needed a new lathe. im still looking for the best deal :laughing:
here are some pictures of a lathe and chuck similar to the ones im using:
the lathe. this is a similar shape to mine. my lathe has no morse tapers and a thread that is no longer used :laughing:
http://www.comparestoreprices.co.uk/images/cl/clarke-wood-lathe.jpg

the chuck. a bit scary to use because of the sticking out jaws, can easily break a finger.
http://www.p-wholesale.com/upimg/17/141a2/chuck-164.jpg


as you can tell i need a new setup and i am searching for the best lathe to get under £400
any suggestions?
 

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I was an aircraft jouneyman sheet metal mechanic for almost 28 years but had a wood class in hi school,so when I retired for the second time,I needed a hobby.I just made a broom for Nancy Pelosi so she and her flying monkeys could fly back to S.F.Opps,was that political?
 

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i just started turning. my grandpa had my great great grandfathers lathe which i have now. its a dunlap(sears) and is still ticking. built in 1942/43. i still use it today. i was self taught and a teacher because i messed around with it a little bit but im taking shop right now in high school and we just did the turning unit making pens and i learned a lot. i love turning now. right now im working on some fishing lures. im trying to get a mandrel set up for it so i can turn game calls. my lathe like mike s' does not have a morse taper but i believe it shopsmith parts will fit it.

btw to those who dont know i looked it up and 400 euros is about $500
 

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I started in 2004. I had just bought a new house that same year. We had a lot of garage space at the time so my wife convinced me to try my hand at woodworking. I bought a circ saw, made a few crude birdhouses, and hung around the local woodworking stores. That's where I soon noticed those beautiful wooden pens in the display at my local Woodcraft. Seeing the relatively low price of a Jet 1014 mini lathe I thought, "Aha! Here's a form of woodworking I can get into for very little money!"

Yeah, right. :laughing:

That $200 lathe cost me around $800 before the first week was out. Shoulda stuck with my circ saw.

My first passion was pens. I was a man possessed! Within six months I had made and sold enough pens to pay for my lathe and accessories. By that time I was burned out on pens so I decided to tackle bowls (with the ultimate goal of doing hollow forms). A year later I bought a Jet 1442. It's still serving me well.

I don't turn as much as I would like anymore. Too many interests and too little time. I turn a bowl now and then, and perhaps the odd Christmas ornament. Still have yet to turn another durn pen.
 

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btw to those who dont know i looked it up and 400 euros is about $500
Sorry to correct you but he mensioned £400, not €400. Britain (and Sweden too for that matter) are members of the European Union but have not adopted the euro as currency. So 400 british pounds would be $600.
 

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Sorry to correct you but he mensioned £400, not €400. Britain (and Sweden too for that matter) are members of the European Union but have not adopted the euro as currency. So 400 british pounds would be $600.
whoops, ok then thank you for the correction
 

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I have been turning for about 9 years. After my Grandfather passed away my uncle gave me his old lathe. It is a late 60's or early 70's Craftsman lathe. It was about worn out when I got it, parts are not very tight anymore. I am mostly self taught. I started with what ever scrap I had laying around, I wanted to figure out how to use the tools. The first things I turned where really nothing but a piece of wood that a bunch of different cuts on it. I turned a couple of baseball bats. Then I bought all the stuff I needed to turn pens. The first few were a disaster. I have an uncle that does woodworking and he had come for Christmas that first year. He showed me a lot of what I was doing wrong and gave suggestions to make me better. After that I bought a chuck for the lathe and tried my hand at turning bowls. About 3 years ago my uncle called and told me I needed to plan a trip to his house because he was going to buy a new lathe and he was going to give me his old one. While we were there I spend a lot of time in his shop with him getting all the pointers I could before we had to leave. The lathe he gave me is a Record lathe, he also gave me the Ringmaster he had for it because it would not fit his new lathe. On that trip he got me into segmented turning and I have been playing with that ever since. Most of the stuff I do in the shop anymore has something to do with turning. Rolling pins, pens, bowls, Ringmaster salad bowls, segmented bowls, and I just started my first pepper mill last week. Waiting for a drill bit extention so I can finish it, had to order it and it was back ordered. I love it and it is a great stress relief.
 

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A short version of a long story.
At a funeral I met a woman walking with a beautiful cane, turns out it was made by a woodturner from Zebra wood with a solid brass "hame" for a handle.
I located the craftsman at a craft show and we talked for a bit, from here on I felt the need to obtain a lathe and try my lack of skills.
Three years ago this week I bought my used Jet 1236 for $400.00.
Since then I have spent nearly $5000.00 for additional "necessary" equipment, books, lumber, etc. Psst....the wife doesn't know this !
I've made several different styled canes, sold a few, kept most for myself, moved onto trying bowls, stoppers, pendants and anything else I can think of.
Presently working on creating a unique pet urn with a screw-on finial. Right now I'm practicing to find the best wood possible for this task.
My fingers are crossed (except when turning).
Enough said..........told you I would try to make it short.
By the way, I'm not a carpenter (have 2 sons that are) and I started this when I was 72 YOA, after retiring from law enforcement, something like Keith Rowley.
 

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Turning Wood

I was selling lumber and I didn't understand some of my clients statements about turning stock. I had to make the mistakes for myself to really understand what turners wanted. Of course, it was addicting and now I have shown my wife and my sister. My mother wants to learn and I now have 4 lathes. It am tempted to give a lathe to each of them so I will have more turning time to myself when I am not sawing logs. The locals at the turning club laugh at me when they find out I saw massive logs and I mostly turn pens....:blink:
Rich
 

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Yea i got wood
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I have worked all my life at times with my dad in his shop and remember when i was about 10 or 11 I watched my dad closely working at his workbench and about 10 yrs ago I was working in my shop and saw my dads hands in mine does that make sense?(bout made me cry)anyway I have learned alot from him over the years and I made my first 2 bowls for christmas when I was 12 and my mom still has hers so ill try to get a pic sometime
 

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My Grandfather had a Shopsmith 10ER and built just about everything including some turned candle stands. So my interest was there for a long time. In College I bought a router and jig saw. That got me started working in wood. Somewhere down that line I needed knobs for the furniture I built so I rigged up an electric drill and turned the knobs.
Around 1980 I purchases a Shopsmith. That got me turning as well as doing more serious woodworking. About 8 or 9 years later I sold the shopsmith and bought stand alone tools including a Delta 46-700 lathe. It's been down hill ever since. Well at least as far as my life savings go. It's been well invested in lots of lathes and other equipment.
 

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I've been playing with turning for about a year now, well maybe a little longer now that I think about it. I'm cheap and don't have lots of cash to lay out there so I wanted the best overall bang for the buck for my shop. That turned out to be an early model 10er Shopsmith that needed some work. It was complete with everything that came new with it. After lots of elbow grease, rust removal, checking bearings, new stand and some new paint she was ready to roll. I quickly discovered that the low speed was still too fast for roughed out bowl blanks so I picked up a free treadmill and did the variable speed DC motor conversion to it. It will run from 90-3000 RPM now and makes for an awesome machine now.:thumbsup: Still a little light duty for some things but works great none the less.
 

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4Woodturning
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I started turning at the age of 14. While in the schools shop class everyone else was making checker boards, I was gluing up walnut and ash to make lamps. My parents bought me my first lathe, an old cast iron flat belt with a hinged motor hanging on back. Turned mostly spindles and lamps back in them days till I moved out on my own, with no room for a shop and to busy chasing the girls I didn’t do much turning till we bought a new house in 1995. Added a wood shop but found out very quickly building shelves, clocks, ect wasn’t for me. So I went back to my first passion woodturning and started up grading lathes, from Clark, Delta, Rockwell, Jet and finally my dream lathe a Oneway 2436 about 5 years ago and been broke ever since. lol
 

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My parents bought me a Jet mini-lathe for Christmas a few years ago, and I really didn't use it much because I didn't know much about how to use a lathe other than making a mess out of any wood I decided to play with. Since then I've gradually started to learn and have bought the attachments to start doing some small turnings like wine bottle stoppers. I still have a long way to go, but I'm enthusiastic about woodturning now and have started adding more tools and attachments. I still need to buy a propper chuck, but need to learn to use what I have before I get too excited buying more stuff than I can use.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I started turning at the age of 14. While in the schools shop class everyone else was making checker boards, I was gluing up walnut and ash to make lamps. My parents bought me my first lathe, an old cast iron flat belt with a hinged motor hanging on back. Turned mostly spindles and lamps back in them days till I moved out on my own, with no room for a shop and to busy chasing the girls I didn’t do much turning till we bought a new house in 1995. Added a wood shop but found out very quickly building shelves, clocks, ect wasn’t for me. So I went back to my first passion woodturning and started up grading lathes, from Clark, Delta, Rockwell, Jet and finally my dream lathe a Oneway 2436 about 5 years ago and been broke ever since. lol
is the oneway 2436 the beast that has a huge barrel-like bed? i dream of owning one of those :smile: how much was yours?
 

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Replacement parts....ballusters,spindles,ect.In an age before everything specialized(CNC),turning was just "part of the job".A required skill.......just up to the point of stand there all day doin pce work.You would be expected to be half-fast and do acceptable work.BW
 

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I did a little turning in high school, but really started in 1978 when I became an apprentice patternmaker.
So, I guess you could say I started turning because I had to.
Still, it is one of the most enjoyable parts of my job.
 

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mike s said:
it would be interesting to know how people got into turning and what their first experiences were like :smile:
how did you start turning?
are you self tough or did you go on a course?
what lathe did you start on? how many lathes have you had?
how long have you been turning?
what was the first thing you turned?

doubt anyone cares but i started turning 6 months ago. my first experience of woodturning was at an outdoor museum, i paid £1 to have a go at using their lathe and i made a bathroom light pull for my grandparents. the shape was a little crude but my grandparents loved it so that's all that matters :)
3 weeks later i was at a village fair and i found an old lathe lying on the floor under a load of car parts, i paid £50 for it and started turning until i realized i needed a chuck. i found a 4 jaw independant chuck at a car boot sale for £5 and my uncles friend rethreaded it to fit my 20 year old lathes headstock thread.
so with my flimsy 20 year old lathe with an independant 4 jaw metalworking chuck i began turning bowls and my knowledge of turning increased until i realised i needed a new lathe. im still looking for the best deal :laughing:
here are some pictures of a lathe and chuck similar to the ones im using:
the lathe. this is a similar shape to mine. my lathe has no morse tapers and a thread that is no longer used :laughing:
http://www.comparestoreprices.co.uk/images/cl/clarke-wood-lathe.jpg

the chuck. a bit scary to use because of the sticking out jaws, can easily break a finger.
http://www.p-wholesale.com/upimg/17/141a2/chuck-164.jpg

as you can tell i need a new setup and i am searching for the best lathe to get under £400
any suggestions?
I started turning last year through Lee Valley Tools. They have great seminars for you to try out new things.
This year for Christmas, my husband bought me a Nova lathe. We are building a house this year and I am looking forward to turning the different components that we will use in our home. I also love turning bowls and want to make more of them, as well as some pepper mills.

I still have to buy the tools and am a little confused in what I should buy first. So for those of you out there, which 3-5 tools should I get to start out with?
 

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I had been doing flat work for 9-10 years and wanted to try turning. Started with a midi lathe doing pens. Then bottle stoppers. Then corkscrews. Then more pens. Then small bowls. Tried to learn on my own (videos mostly). Took a turning class throught Woodcraft and was really hooked. Broke some bad habits and turning got more fun. Kept at the small stuff for about a year and then went to Craft Supply USA in Utah for their week long beginner woodturning class with Dale Nish. Pricy class but 8 hours a day of turning for 5 straight days with 2-3 of the best turners in the world. Skills went through the roof (although I'd still consoder myself a low intermediate level turner). Best money I ever spent on any hobby (and I've got a few). Came home and upgraded to a Jet 1642 EVS. Still do lots of small stuff but now do lots of bowls, lidded boxes and potpourri holders. Done several peppermills. Am going back to Utah in APril for a 3 day intermediate class. I highly recommend these classes to anyone who seriously wants to get better. EVERYONE at Craft Supply is super nice and very helpful.
 
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