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Discussion Starter #1
So, I have eight different color combinations. And I have no idea which one to go with.

In the picture: five different swatches, the top four have a different color on each side, and the bottom was "glazed," or the best I could do, according to Charles Neil's technique.



image-654592746.jpg

Sorry if I posted this wrong or the picture sucks.
 

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Assign a number to each sample, write each of those numbers on a separate piece of paper, put into a hat and draw one piece of paper. Go with that one!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Honestly,

I bought a whitewash style stain by Miniwax, and it turned out to be far to yellow for my liking. The other color was coffee brown. Love the coffee color but it is to dark; and I'm using both stains on mostly birch plywood. So, I'm trying to lighten up the coffee with the yellow which worked in a few cases but others it just turned out grayish. I wanted the base of my table to be darker and the table top to be lighter. So some sort of antique type look I guess is what I'm working towards. I really like the way the glazing turned out but again it is still to dark and I would really like to see the beautiful matrices of the wood. Thanks to all for the help. Stilllllll leanrrrrnnning.
 

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The majority of the antique pine I've seen has a green cast to it. That is due to the furniture having been soaked in a sodium hydroxide dip tank. You could simulate the green look with a thin coat of green dye. Just be careful, it doesn't take very much dye. Practice on some scrap wood. I would guess the green dye is about 95% solvents for that look. You might also add a little raw umber dye to the mix to subdue the green a little. Raw umber is a brown without the red.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
To all,

I picked a color that ended up being the two colors I had ( yellowish whitewash, and coffee) mixed together on top of each other one right after the other; all of which are water-based.

With three coats of poly, sprayed on.


image-4076378929.jpg
 

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To all,

I picked a color that ended up being the two colors I had ( yellowish whitewash, and coffee) mixed together on top of each other one right after the other; all of which are water-based.

With three coats of poly, sprayed on.


View attachment 80956
That is absolutely beautiful. What kind of wood is that? I can identify some woods but I'm no expert at it :p I love the finish. My favorite part of projects is finishing them. I love when something catches the eye and just seems to hit you deep down in your soul and I get that when seeing the finish on this piece. Very pretty.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It is just birch plywood. The project was just a small side table and it turned into a month long project. And it took a few tries at polyurethaning with a brush, then sanding it down again to get rid of the streaks. Finally I settled with just a cheap air brush, but in the end it has six or so coats of polyurethane. All water-base products, even the stains. The amazing trick that I learned through this process was polishing. First, I wet sanded the burrs down with 2000grit; then used an orbital with 3000grit on it, and finally polished it with machine polish and polisher. Pneumatic orbital and the air brush really helped aid in a amazing final product. Thanks for the compliments, I worked really hard on it, and it turned out great.
 
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