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Small Plywood Rack to hold the smaller cut-offs. The other rack will now hold full or nearly full sheets. I love making Dados. Without them, assembly would be a nightmare when
working alone. This was mostly a scrap project.
Pic 1.JPG Pic 2.JPG Pic 3.JPG Pic 4.JPG Pic 5.JPG Pic 6.JPG P1220001.JPG P1220019.JPG
 

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Egg Spurt
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Delivered the cabinets I've been working on all week..something wasn't quite square so the drawers didn't want to sit flush with the face frame so..took one apart and trimmed one rail about 1/8" and reassembled it.. My customer was estatic and thrilled. They look a LOT better than the originals.. I am NOT looking forward to wrestling with the granite countertop and sink later this week..
 

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Mochi Making Kit

One of my adult children likes mochi, a Japanese food made from rice flour, often served in a ball shape with a sweet filling. We wanted to buy a mochi-making kit as a gift. We saw one mochi-making kit online briefly around Christmas. They were snapped up quickly and are no longer available. We looked at the list of items in the kit and decided to buy the components separately, along with a book. The cost was much lower than buying the kit anyway. I got the task of making the wood components. The box design is from the school of "Japanese Elegant Simplicity" (Yeah, my term. I made it up.)

Challenges:
  • I finally built that perfect 3/8 inch box joint jig after my frustrations with Freud's dado sizing chart.
  • Resawing a wide piece of bloodwood on the bandsaw was a big challenge. It pushed the bandsaw to its absolute limits, even with a fresh 3/4 inch 3 TPI blade. The bandsaw is old. I has a rated 2 horsepower motor (really?) running on a 20 amp 110 volt circuit. By the way, bloodwood is very hard and dense.
  • Hand-cutting a clean, neat, 3/32 inch wide mortice for the handle, when my slimmest chisel was 1/8 inch wide. I can't imagine what I would have done if my Pfeil marking knife had not been "SWISS MADE." :) Seriously, I chopped out the mortice carefully with wider chisels from the middle of the mortice, slicing down across the fibers of the grain. I worked the mortice wider and deeper as I went along, carefully avoiding expansion to the knife marks until the end. I kept the bottom flat with careful scraping. I did the final cleanup to the knife marks and squared the sides as the last step. The work was brutal on my good chisels; it raised heavy burrs on the backs. The chisels required frequent touchups on the sharpening stone. By the way, did I mention that bloodwood is very hard and dense?
Lessons Learned:
  • Dado Shims Can Spite You
    • I learned what it feels like when dado shims slip into the arbor threads of the saw (despite due care to avoid it) ... and how to prevent it from happening in the future. A drop of oil helps for adhesion. Even better, my spouse gave me magnetic shims for Valentine's Day. How did she know?
  • Unless You Have a Good Reason, Keep Your Dado Stacks Simple
    • In other words, shims are more useful for matching board thicknesses for shelf dados, etc., not box joint jigs. I made my box joint jig exactly 3/8 inch because I designed my box to be an exact dimension, and foresaw future boxes to be nice, even multiples of 3/8 inch. The result is that I must add shims to make my dado stack fit the box joint jig. That's okay, but it is extra trouble that is not absolutely necessary for most box joint applications. It might have been better to make the box joint jig fit the dado blades/chippers without the shims and adjust the box dimensions accordingly.
  • For Small Joinery (Like the Handle on the Box), Cut the Mortice in a Size that Fits Your Tools, THEN Make/Plane/Sand the Part to Fit the Mortice
    • I had a small piece of special bog oak from half a pen blank that I wanted to use up. Because the blank had been drilled, I used the bandsaw to trim the piece to the widest possible remainder, which was approximately 3/32 inch. Then I cut the mortice to match the piece perfectly. It took a lot of time and effort to make a clean matching mortice with hand chisels. It would have been far easier and faster to use a router with a slightly wider bit. If I preferred, I could have made a 1/8 inch wide mortice quickly with the 1/8 inch chisel. After that, I should have wasted a new pen blank to cut a matching piece of bog oak to fit. It would have saved a lot of time. Frankly, the bog oak pen blanks weren't that expensive, just hard to get.
Wood and Finish:
  • Box: Maple
  • Bottom Inset Panel and Lid: Bloodwood
  • Handle: 6500 year old bog oak from Ireland. This wood was actually dated in a lab at a university in Belfast, based on the tree ring spacing.
  • Rolling Pin: Granadillo (probably Macacauba)
  • Anti-Roll-Off-The-Counter Supports: Marblewood
  • Finishes (food safe):
    • Rolling Pin and Holders: Tried and True Original
    • Box and Lid: Tried and True Varnish Oil
(Note: I took the photos early. The wood pieces are due for two or three more coats of finish and burnishing.)

Mochi Kit Box.JPG Mochi Kit.JPG Rolling pin with holders.JPG
 

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Termite
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Spent a couple hours with the boy at bass pro. Getting pliers, fish line cutters, etc. Stuff for his seat, stuff for mine. Guess will flip a coin to see who's running the show that day at the lake. He's 6'4 I'm 5'6 can't wrestle for front seat on the boat... Hope he agrees to a coin toss..
 

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Dump run with the 'Burb half full of garbage. Laptop got a new SS hard drive and a lot of pet peeves fixed.
Files and program transfers appear to be seamless.

Finally believe(?) that I have the positions drawn out for mortise and tenon joints for some turtle legs.
Can't see what I'm doing so turtle body is upside down with left side and right side labels as legs are unique.
 

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Living in the energy capital of the world - Texas.
I personally didn't have any real problems. bought a dozen jugs of bottled water in advance. Disconnected my water supply hose. Filled up my 2 30Lb propane bottles and closely monitored them for consumption rate. Knew I could make it 2 days + if I kept temp at around 60. After the second day, I was almost out and all the propane places around here were shut down due to power shortages. We managed to eek out one more day on the 2 tanks. Then was able to refill. To me it was more of an inconvenience for a few days. No so much for my neighbors in our RV park. The storm had dominated TV news for almost the entire time.
Fortunately my RV had a built-in electric heater (fake fireplace) and I had an extra electric heater - the kind that look like an old rediator. My furnace runs off propane and batteries for the blower.
 

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Looks like this cold snap finally carried on. Woke up to a dead battery 3 times last week, finally fixed my block heater plug, to realize it was a slow drain coming from a burnt out rear motor wiper.

Hard to believe I walked out the door this morning and thought it wasn't to cold Finally, only to see -18°C on the dash... -45° is not something you want to get used to.
 

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Nice work TA. Its always. Ice to make something with a utility purpose that can also be a memory for someone.

Were putting new flooring in our house. I cleaned up after the guys who are doing the work.

Hear that? “The guys who are doing the work”. 😉😉

Its rained every weekend for 3 weeks. Got all the upper kitchen doors made, waiting for good painting weather so I can paint.

I had to order BIN shellac based primer both Home Depots were out. I thought I heard somewhere there a problem with shellac?
 

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Mark Jones Ozark
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My son called. Hey dad do you need any painting done? We are off work due to the -7 degrees and the 8" of snow. So he came down and we pulled up carpet and trim and pulled out the doors. Sanded the walls. Filled the holes. Sanded the trim and painted it all white. Painted the walls. Laid down flooring and hung 2 new doors. Bought a new finish nail gun and put the trim back in place with a few modifications. Filled those holes and then moved my office out of one room to the other....o my what a week! He was painting the front room while I was moving my office. It's been a week since I ran my CNC machine! That's a record! No worries. A friend brought a paddle by for me to laser in some names! Ran through 30 dollars of propane in the shop last week. It's been a COLD spell 30 year records here.
 

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The weather is so rainy at izmir three weeks ago.. Two people are dead in here..it is like tsunami.. it is flood disaster.

I was born here.. I am living here .. I guess i will dead here..

I have never seen earthquake and flood disaster in here before...
I guess they call climate change ..
I am wondering what is the next disaster?

SM-J700F cihazımdan Tapatalk kullanılarak gönderildi

P.S i hope Everythings will be allright ..My heart is with Texas people..
 

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I tried to install a new toilet flange but could not find my small hammer drill. I spent the entire day tearing my shop up looking for it. I found some other stuff I was looking for like my framing hammer, but now it’s going to take another full day to get the shop back in order. I wanted to use my table saw tomorrow to cut 45deg pieces and now I have boxes piled up on it.

I gave up looking for my hammer drill so I guess I’m going to Harbor Freight to buy a cheap hammer drill unless I can figure out another way to drill 2 small holes in concrete for Tapcon® screws.
 

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I gave up looking for my hammer drill so I guess I’m going to Harbor Freight to buy a cheap hammer drill unless I can figure out another way to drill 2 small holes in concrete for Tapcon® screws.
First I'd try a masonry bit in a normal drill, it will be slow but for just 2 holes maybe better than buying a 2nd hammer drill. Yeah it drives me nuts too loosing something around the shop and house, currently I'm missing my favorite coutersinking bit.
 

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First I'd try a masonry bit in a normal drill, it will be slow but for just 2 holes maybe better than buying a 2nd hammer drill. Yeah it drives me nuts too loosing something around the shop and house, currently I'm missing my favorite coutersinking bit.
Thanks,
I’ve been trying to drill two 5/32 in holes with a regular drill, but it only heats up the bit. I had this problem years ago with ½ hole and was able to break it up with a small punch. I would alternate back and forth with the punch and then the drill until I was deep enough. I don’t have anything hard and strong enough to fit in a 5/32 hole.

I have manual hammer drill similar to a concrete punch except that you put a drill bit in it and turn with each hit of a hammer. It works really well except that I don’t have a 5/32 bit
 

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Thanks,
I’ve been trying to drill two 5/32 in holes with a regular drill, but it only heats up the bit. I had this problem years ago with ½ hole and was able to break it up with a small punch. I would alternate back and forth with the punch and then the drill until I was deep enough. I don’t have anything hard and strong enough to fit in a 5/32 hole.

I have manual hammer drill similar to a concrete punch except that you put a drill bit in it and turn with each hit of a hammer. It works really well except that I don’t have a 5/32 bit
You were using an ordinary twist bit on the concrete? A quick search shows plenty of 5/32 masonry bits out there, it's what you'd want with a hammer drill too. It will be slow with an ordinary drill, but I think worth a try. Since you don't have the hammer action I'd move the drill slightly side to side, forward and back, not enough to press the bit on the sides of the hole, but enough to move the pressure of the bit at the bottom around.

About your concrete punch, that's how they used to drill holes in granite etc for explosives while tunneling etc. Yikes! That's what the old song about John Henry is about.
 

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You were using an ordinary twist bit on the concrete? A quick search shows plenty of 5/32 masonry bits out there, it's what you'd want with a hammer drill too. It will be slow with an ordinary drill, but I think worth a try. Since you don't have the hammer action I'd move the drill slightly side to side, forward and back, not enough to press the bit on the sides of the hole, but enough to move the pressure of the bit at the bottom around.

About your concrete punch, that's how they used to drill holes in granite etc for explosives while tunneling etc. Yikes! That's what the old song about John Henry is about.
No, No, I was using the concrete drill bit that came with the Tapcon® screws, but you did give me an idea. I could use an old twist drill bit attached to vise grips to hammer in the hole and then use the carbide-tipped Tapcon drill bit with regular drill to finish.

I have a lot of old hand tools that my dad used in the 40s & 50s. They come in handy when the power goes out
 
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It will be nice to share what woodworking we do on a daily basis.


So I would be interested in knowing what you did today?


On my side, today I cut 8 tenons for a lawn bench project I am working on. Tomorrow I plan to cut matching mortises, and fit with dowels.


Thanks for sharing your work!:smile3:
I am just finishing up a upright dresser. I sprayed it late last week. Today I installed the drawers and fine tuned. Tomorrow I will set the drawer faces and complete it by installing the hardware. How do you do your M&T? I always cut my mortises first, then fit the tenons to the mortises, you seem to do it the other way around. How does that work out for you?
 

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Was gonna start on a man's jewelry box for my grandson. I had some sketches mad and wasnt sure of the ratios of length, width and height
Went in the scrap pile and made it of flake board. Slightly changed the dimension to what I think is more pleasing to the eye probably start the real one on Thurs.
Also edged glued 1/4' maple yesterday and tested it to destruction. Doesn't take 200+ lbs to destroy a 1/4" panel. The board did not break on the glue line so it was a winning situation. I'm used to edge gluing thicker boards and then slice them in half with table saw and band saw.
 

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Mark Jones Ozark
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Finished up making 17 wooden 9" canteens. Those Royal Rangers (Church Boyscouts) were pretty excited to take them home. Waterproofed them with bee's wax. They came out nice. The boys filled them with water and had a good drink. Those Fir ole splits and knots held water just fine!
Canteen Part 4 Wooden - YouTube
 

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Termite
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Went by a glass place today. You have to call them before they will let you in..

Looking for special. Glass for a tv stand. Wasn't a 100% sure so I thought I'd ask the community.

All he had...
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