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We have a lot of bats in MT, I'm not sure where they go during the day but at night they fly around our porch, never really bother us at all. I love them so I bought a bat house off Amazon that houses up to 300 bats. They're not that big at all and they seem fairly straightforward construction wise. The instructions say to face the house where it will get the majority of sun from early am to mid afternoon.
I got 3 mosquito bites just tonight so I'm going build one ASP.
 

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Started putting corrugated metal roofing on my new garden shed, but then realized that I may have a problem. I really didn’t care about the shed being square because the roof was going to overhang and think it would show. Now I see that I don’t have a square reference point to start my panels.

This happened to me 48 years ago on a 30’ x 100’ steel prefab building. It was just a little out of square, but the front roof edge looked like saw teeth and I had to cut the roof panels so it looked straight. So now I’m trying to set up a string line or something to use as my squared straight edge.
 

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Helped build a custom cabinet for my daughter with help from her boyfriend. It would probably have been faster alone but they learned a lot.
 

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I have made many for people, just keep in mind it may take years before the bats find them.
I'm all for the bats. Wife and I went to an outdoor film festival in North Carolina a couple of years ago. They had some huge bat boxes near the roof of their building, maybe 20 feet up. When the sun set the bats came pouring out like a cloud! The announcer stated that there wasn't a mosquito for at least a mile around. We all sat on the grass, watching the films, till about 1am. Not a Skeeter bite on anyone.

Any how, I ain't been on here in awhile. I started building a wood strip canoe January 1st
built my strong back. I used as scrap and refurbished material I could to keep the cost down.
I am using saw mill, air dried and local wood. Planed the boards and cut the strips. 1/4 inch thick by 3/4 wide by however long I can get them, which was anywhere from 4' to 9' long.
cut out my forms
and started stripping
more stripping
more stripping
got it closed up
lots of glue scraping, hand planing and sanding. I forgot to mention I did bead and cove each strip. I have some areas to fill and then finish sand before epoxy and fiberglassing. But first I need to finish a display cabinet for my wife.
It's good to be back
Roy
 

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Today I got to hear my 1988 Jeep Cherokee run for the first time in two years. Hope to have it back on the road soon. I cleaned up the shop and didn't have enough sawdust to put on the power steering fluid drips on the floor...
 

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I'm all for the bats. Wife and I went to an outdoor film festival in North Carolina a couple of years ago. They had some huge bat boxes near the roof of their building, maybe 20 feet up. When the sun set the bats came pouring out like a cloud! The announcer stated that there wasn't a mosquito for at least a mile around. We all sat on the grass, watching the films, till about 1am. Not a Skeeter bite on anyone.

Any how, I ain't been on here in awhile. I started building a wood strip canoe January 1st
built my strong back. I used as scrap and refurbished material I could to keep the cost down.
I am using saw mill, air dried and local wood. Planed the boards and cut the strips. 1/4 inch thick by 3/4 wide by however long I can get them, which was anywhere from 4' to 9' long.
cut out my forms
and started stripping
more stripping
more stripping
got it closed up
lots of glue scraping, hand planing and sanding. I forgot to mention I did bead and cove each strip. I have some areas to fill and then finish sand before epoxy and fiberglassing. But first I need to finish a display cabinet for my wife.
It's good to be back
Roy

That is beautiful, great job
 

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Thank you Referred. Hoping to glass the outside of hull next week. Never done that before, so I'm a little hesitant.
 

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Mark Jones Ozark
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Maple Resaw

A friend at work cut down a big ole Maple tree and he asked if I wanted some of the limb logs. Sure. So I picked up 3 of them this Saturday morning and then resawed them over the holiday weekend. My son came in to town and gave me a hand on the resaw. It was a fun project. I spent Monday cleaning up and making firewood and stickering. Just need to dip the ends of the boards in parfin wax and sticker and then store it out in the shed for a year. The resaw table is winch and weight sled pulled. I have 4 pallets of 4' long lumber of oak, walnut, cedar and now maple. 2 of the pallets have air dried enough now. Can pull the stickers and stack it now.
 

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Here is a name plaque, a small "extra" birthday gift for one of the young people in our family.

The board came from a disassembled oak table. They kept the top but gave me the rest to harvest the wood, so I thought it would nice to return part of it. I did the letter cuts using a Rockler "State Park" sign kit with a compact router. The edging is "classic Roman ogee." The rear slot was made with a 3/8 inch hanging slot router bit on the router table. Having made a few slots with a single plunge hole in the past, I decided this time to try a double hole. The double hole may be more convenient and less confusing. It took two plunges.

Spouse did the painting and final finishing. Pink is the recipient's favorite color, and the gray wash matches their "country/rustic" room decor. The plastic bag has two different screws and a nail to offer a choice and make it convenient for their mom to help hang it.
 

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Here is a red oak shelf, designed to match an existing shelf from the 1970s, which Spouse owned before I met her. This shelf is a scaled down version of the original, made by request from Spouse.

Decades ago, red oak was the cheapest hardwood available. It was all that us poor students could afford. We would pool our funds, order a huge truckload of boards, get it dumped on the driveway, and divide the boards among us. I don't remember how many truckloads we bought during those years. I was so burned out on red oak. This shelf came from the first red oak board I have bought in many decades. I enjoyed it, mostly. The shelf had some interesting twists and curls in the grain, not shown.

The corbels were rough cut using a bandsaw, then trimmed to shape with a top/bottom bearing router bit. I made a pattern from 1/4 inch MDF. I forget which bearing I used. I used a 1/8 inch roundover bit on the corbels, like the original shelf. The edging on the shelf and bottom board is "classic Roman ogee", a close match to the original shelf.

I glued only the back of the shelf to the bottom board and the back of the corbels. Unlike the original, the rest of the shelf is not glued to the front of the corbels. It was my idea to allow for wood movement. I have not seen that done before, so we shall see if it works.
 

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Sometimes cutting red oak smells like dog poop. Other than that, it is a good value. easy to work with. A blind man can edge 2 boards together and they will look like one. Great grain matching ability. I like to make furnitiure with contrasting wood. My favorite is padauk tops and drawer fronts with red oak apron and legs. I have sold tons of that
Red oak also works great with walnut.
Some people like a black lacquer table or desk with the grain showing through.
The pores are deep enough that if you use a paste wood grain filler (not the normal wood filler) of a different color, it changes the whole appearance.

BTW, GREAT job on the shelf.
 

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Mark Jones Ozark
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I have been on a box joint binge this past week. Made 3 more sets last night. I can cut 24 of these box sides at one time. They are just 1/4" but it's doing what I wanted it to do. Moving on to some solid woods soon. I need to get some of the air drying walnut out of the shed and resaw it down to 3/8" first!

http://readyrangers.tzo.com/2020BoxJointJig/2020BoxJointJig.htm
 

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Our flagpole bracket broke. I made a replacement from wood. The replacement was going to be painted, so I salvaged good pieces of wood from a rotted length of 3x3 mahogany that had been given to me by a friend. The mahogany had "forklift notches." It may have started out as a cargo base from an old railroad car. This was a good use for the potentially unsafe wood. Three pieces were clamped together with Titebond III to get a solid block.

The flagpole diameter was not a good match to any of my drills, but a piece of scrap PVC conduit was a perfect fit. West Systems G/Flex epoxy was used to make a solid bottom for the conduit and to glue and seal the conduit in its hole. The trickiest part was using the drill press to drill a hole at the correct angle and position to hit the bottom corner of the conduit. When the bracket is attached to the angled fascia board, the hole is vertical to allow rain water to drain out. The screw holes match the original bracket, so the attachment holes in the fascia board could be reused.

Photos:
* Original flagpole bracket.
* Sample of the worm-eaten "railroad car mahogany" that I used. (I used good pieces, not "holy" ones like this.)
* Closeup of flagpole bracket.
* Flag in bracket.
 

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Still working on electrical wiring.
The shop only has 1 20A outlet. I also have a small Honda 2K Generator which is good for about 13 Amps.

last week, I hooked up a temporary electrial system which was a true Rube Goldberg.

Yesterday and today I was working on a more permanent system, or as permanent as I can get. This 3rd try at it, was my best idea yet. I wasted to much time and effort trying to maximize the house current of 20A and work the over flow with the Honda when necessary. Then it occurred to me, that it should be the other way around.

So now I will have three separate systems which can easily be joined. The biggest problem is the single duplex outlet is on the wrong wall for me. Also, I can not electrically tie into the 20A duplex outlet or otherwise mess with it, but I can use extension cords all I want.

So, the right side wall, where I always like to work has or will have 2 rows of 4x4 outlets. An upper and a lower row. Each 4x4 box is 10' apart. The upper row is going to be connected via an extension cord and into the house 20A duplex. the lower row will be used for lights, fans and low consumption tools. It has a plug at the end. It can go either of 2 ways - one would be straight to the small gen set set or plug directly onto the row under neath it which would tap it into the house duplex. This will probably be how it will be usd 90% of the time. When necessaaryl like in using table saw, planer, air compressor and other heavy useage it will be plugged into the genny. With this set-up, there is no way taht I could accidentally plug genny into the hot AC box.
The left side wall, where the house 20A duplex is, I have a single row of 4x4 outlets same as other side but the center box will PLUG into it the house box.
Since my heaviest usage machine will only draw 15A to 16A, this should work out just finr for a one man shop.

If I do need a larger generator, all the excess wiring is for naught, but what the heck.

Anyhow, what I will have is 3 rows of 3 4x4's each acting as 3 separate 'extension' cords 20' total length each. And this would be a Rube Goldberg 'Light'.

If this sounds crazy, you should see what the 'temporary' version looks like.
 

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Historical Storm Windows!

I finally built my first two reproduction storm windows for the 100yr old house that I bought 3 years ago. They feature reproduction sash hanger hardware and storm window operators from Kilian Hardware. I used beadlock loose tenons and glazed in double-strength glass.

I'm really happy with the beadlock loose tenon system. I wish it were not a proprietary "Rocker" product, but I can't afford a $700 festool setup. Loose tenons kick butt!

I'd post a photo, but "fresh" 33' DAP window glazing is sticky stuff that makes everything looks filthy until it dries and can be cleaned properly. It'll be a couple weeks before I can make it look good for a photo.

Regardless... it's still a million times better-looking than the grungy and ubiquitous aluminum storm windows that were on there for the last 50 years.
 
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