Woodworking Talk banner

21 - 39 of 39 Posts

·
making all the things
Joined
·
31 Posts
A live center for the tailstock would be great. However, dead centers were used for a very long time with no problem. I would try to get by in the short run with the dead center, at worst it will scorch the wood a little which will probably be cut off anyway.
I use a shot of spray lubrication (Liquid Wrench) on the end of the wood at the tailstock and it seems to help a bit with the dead center issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
yeah, I forgot to mention that I knew about the safety aspects of it, which I have already, and I was planning on spending a few hundred bucks on some starter chisels. Any recommendations on specific chisel sets are welcome and appreciated. Are there any chucks or hardware I need to go along with this though? Thanks!
I would buy a few at a time .Go to a wood turnning web site and you will get more info their . I only have henry taylor tool's. It sure wouldn't be any of the sear's stuff. You will have to find out what size the drive is and maybe a nova chuck. That is the one i have. here is about the taylor tool's Lot's of supplyer of different brand's and set's As far as dead centers they make one with ball beiring also which i use . My leathe is a delta with square bed. Now with the round bed you have to watch the tool rest doesn't move. Like on the round bed their isn't much holding it from turning . Also go to this site and see what you can find . http://www.woodturnersresource.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl

http://www.woodturnersresource.com/websites/

http://www.henrytaylortools.co.uk/slected.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
thats the one I was talking about. No roughing gouge? guess not. I thought the 1" was the roughing gouge:huh:?
I believe it is just their terminology. The far right and the fourth from the left have a tang, also I have never heard of a "spindle gouge" that large... but they are normal for a "spindle roughing gouge". The second from the right is solid bar with no flat tang, that is how all spindle gouges that I have seen are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,314 Posts
The three wing cutters are made for a shaper. What you need for the lathe is a set of wood lathe chisels. If you don't plan to make a lot of projects, or use a lot of oak the cheapest set of chisels will do. The cheap tools will just need sharpen more often. You will also need a pair of lathe calipers to check the diameter of the spindles. I wouldn't turn wood just to practise. Find some simple project important to you like a footstool with spindle legs or something. You will get more out of it that way. Make sure the wood is firmly secured in the machine and tighten from time to time. Just keep if mind if the wood comes out it could hit you in the face. When you start cutting, use the large gouge first to round the piece off. Using the gouge flat it will through the shavings right in your face. If you rotate the gouge clockwise a little you will find it will through the shavings to the right and not in your face. The rest is like a potters wheel where you cut away all but what you want the spindle to look like. I believe you will find the lathe is the most fun of all woodworking equipment.
 

·
Firewood Inquisitor
Joined
·
438 Posts
I really disagree with the previous post. When you're getting started ALL you should be doing is practicing and having fun, don't worry about trying to make anything in particular, just keep making coves and beads. That's what firewood is for. You can get frustrated if you try to make multiple identical things right away, especially since you'll probably have catches at the wrong moment. Just see how the wood feels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,733 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
Well heck, you guys were right, this is a lot of fun and I can see myself spending way too much money doing it. This morning I tried my first piece with the lathe with just a piece of pine I had laying around and some old wood chisels. I'm pleasantly surprised at how much fun it was. Thanks for the tip on creating my own center with the bolt, it worked like a champ.



Now, as far as usage, the instructions I have tell me to remove the spur center and drive it into the piece before turning. Can I reasonably assume that there's supposed to be an allen screw here in the hole that holds that spur in place? Because I can't find anything that will turn any screws inside that hole.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
The hole in the spur itself is to hold the center point in place, adjust the length, (or to replace the point if you drop it on concrete enough times). This should be an allen screw. Since the point was missing the screw may be missing. The spindle should be hollow, insert a “knock out rod” from the other end and knock the spur out. This may take a little while because it looks like the spur may be frozen in from non-use and need some penetrating oil to loosen it. When reinstalling do not tap the spur into place, just pressure from the tailstock provides all the fit you need.
You may need to use some 0000 steel wool to clean the center; you can also use a dowel and steel wool to clean the inside of the taper if necessary.
When you mount your work piece use a wooded mallet or soft hammer to seat the spur in the wood. Do not use a steel hammer of you can bugger up the end of the spur which can then bugger up the taper in your spindle leading to big problems.
If it is a hard piece of wood tap enough to mark the wood with the spurs. Take a bench chisel and cut the notches for the wings to seat in. Note, one side of the wings are flat so chisel straight down and then remove wood from only the angles side. This will leave a flat in the wood for the flat of the spur to press against. About 1/8”- 1/4” is deep enough.


BYW, that is some very smooth finish of the wood.:thumbsup:
 
  • Like
Reactions: flutterbys

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
Lapse of memory... I do mostly face work turning.
For spindle orientation do not hammer in the spur drive much or you can split the wood, additionally use of a chisel on the end of a spindle is awkward at best.
Cut diagonals on the ends (about 1/8" deep) with your bandsaw, handsaw, whatever you have. A light tap with will seat the blades in the kerf.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Taylormade

·
Firewood Inquisitor
Joined
·
438 Posts
When you said "wood chisels", you didn't mean something besides turning chisels, did you? I wouldn't try using bench chisels or something else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
When you said "wood chisels", you didn't mean something besides turning chisels, did you? I wouldn't try using bench chisels or something else.
I have used a bench chisel.
Not my first choice but it works none the less!
I have turned with an ex-acto blade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,733 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
When you said "wood chisels", you didn't mean something besides turning chisels, did you? I wouldn't try using bench chisels or something else.
yep, I used an old wood chisel and then went out and bought some starter chisels from HF this morning. Of course I found out immediately how much better real chisels are when turning :)

I'm happy, I just need to start some projects now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Taylor you need to get a 3/4 x 16 nut for on the headstock shaft behind the spur. You should never drive the spur into or out of the shaft. You will have no choice but derive it out now since the nut was removed and never replaced. Driving the spur out can move the shaft and bearings in the housing so keep an eye on the shaft and only use as little force as necessary. Believe me it happens. :whistling2::yes:

Once you have the nut placed on the shaft you can place an open end wrench over the spur shaft and run the nut out to it and using another wrench push the spur loose.

Also the point in the spur, and the dead center, only need to be tapped in with a good punch placed close to where they enter the centers, there are no threads in that hole for a setscrew. The hole is to remove the point for replacement.

I have the manual for that lathe if you can't find it online.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Taylormade

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,314 Posts
Hand chisels are too short to use on a lathe. If it ever grabs you're going to have a sore wrist. At least glue the handle into a piece of pipe to give you some leverage. I don't drive the spur into the wood. I was taught to take a hand saw and cut the end of the stock corner to corner 1/2" deep both ways to mortise for the spur. I now cut the ends of the stock on the table saw across the center. This will give a much better bite for the spur. Otherwise it may slip and its hard to get the spur back to center.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,733 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
Hand chisels are too short to use on a lathe. If it ever grabs you're going to have a sore wrist. At least glue the handle into a piece of pipe to give you some leverage. I don't drive the spur into the wood. I was taught to take a hand saw and cut the end of the stock corner to corner 1/2" deep both ways to mortise for the spur. I now cut the ends of the stock on the table saw across the center. This will give a much better bite for the spur. Otherwise it may slip and its hard to get the spur back to center.
Yeah, I'm done with the hand chisels, I picked up a set of lathe chisels to do damage with so I'm all set there. And I've been making the cross cuts on the band saw to sit the spur into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Quit messing around on the forum and get out there and turn something. Less chatter, more turning. :laughing:

Like maybe a mushroom or two. :laughing:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,733 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
Quit messing around on the forum and get out there and turn something. Less chatter, more turning. :laughing:

HAHAHAHA I'm about to go get a nut for my lathe and then we'll see what's what since I can't cut my doors today :furious:

I may end up turning a beer tap before the end of the day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,248 Posts
thats the one I was talking about. No roughing gouge? guess not. I thought the 1" was the roughing gouge:huh:?
Huh? Why is the last one on the right NOT a roughing gouge? Looks like what I see advertised as a roughing gouge. Looks like the roughing gouge I bought. What am I missing?
 
21 - 39 of 39 Posts
Top