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Discussion Starter #1
I picked up a parts bin for a buck at a yard sale. One of the bins had these in it. The are made from aluminum. Anyone know what they are ?

ForumRunner_20131105_205856.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yep, from google images that's what they appear to be. I guess I never saw a rivet that wasn't riveted.:huh:
 

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They are not the style that have the wire and go in a rivet gun. I think they are more of a hands on style and use a steel plate to rest the rounded end. Then you hammer the small end with a special tool that mushrooms it....I think. One could use them to rivet something that does not actually need to be tight.
 

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To fasten the rivet, the end of the shank is impacted, pressed or spun after the rivet has been inserted into a work-piece. A solid head is formed (upset) to create the clinched head of the rivet. When impact or press clinched, the force required to form the clinched head of the rivet swells the entire shank of the rivet to completely fill the work-piece hole. Swelling of the shank occurs most by the clinched head end of the rivet. Spun/orbital/radial rivet clinches require less tonnage to form than impact or pressed rivets; therefore, do not have the same shank swelling capability. Pre-punched or drilled work-piece holes are required for use on most solid rivet applications.

Why use solid rivets?



  • High speed assembly. Rivets feed automatically in impact Rivet Machines that cycle in approximately 3/10th of a second
  • Material grain flow structure of solid rivets, along with the shank swelling during assembly, creates the strongest riveted joint. High shear strength values
  • Permanent fastener that cannot be removed without destroying one of the rivet heads
  • Inexpensive alternative to threaded fasteners
  • Ease of joint inspection
  • Virtually no scrap is produced during the manufacturing process
  • Easily adapted for automation
  • http://www.valleyfastener.com/solid...%2BFastener%2BGroup&ex=127rvyc-13c8k9q-vg76ml







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Here is what the tools look like to mushroom the ends. In my neck of the woods rivets are used on a lot of farm type machinery. A good example is the teeth on an old Gravely sickle bar. That was a really good find.



 

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I use this type of rivet for larger leather-working. Works well for fastening heavy oz. Latigo for certain applications. Shines up nice for a good contrast against black leather.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, they aren't going to do me any good. If anybody wants them I'll throw them in an envelope and mail them to ya. There was also a bin of upholstery tacks that I'll send out also. I'm just going to end up throwing them in the trash or recycling.
 

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PM sent

Did you ever find the lever cap you were looking for? Did you need a keyhole style or kidney shape style? It was for a 5 right?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
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Did you ever find the lever cap you were looking for? Did you need a keyhole style or kidney shape style? It was for a 5 right?
I need a frog for a 7. There is one on ebay but I have some many irons in the fire right now, fixing up the 7 isn't high on the list right now.
 

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Hey guess what I got in the mail today? Thank You very much nbo10, that's a great assortment of rivets, I will put them to good use. Thanks again, Dave :thumbsup:
 
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