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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know some of you guys have probably seen my multiple questions along these lines. I'm thinking TS, DC, jointer, what else should I plan a 220 line for in the future? Do bandsaws and drill presses typically run 220?
 

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You can pretty much get any machine in a 220 version or be able to convert it. When I built my shop last year I put 220 everywhere alongside 110 and it has come in handy.

Current 220 machines in my shop:
Table saw
Bandsaw
DC
Edge Sander


I probably have 6 empty 220 plugs on the wall but I am happy to have them there just in case.
 

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where's my table saw?
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good advice!

You can't have too many circuits, whether 120 V or 220 V. Here's a rule of thumb. If a machine has a 3 HP motor it will need 220V. Now that's a real 3 HP, not "developed" like a shop vac. The motor will be the size of a watermellon, not a soft ball.

You can have more than one receptacle on the same circuit since the breaker is meant to shut down when it senses excessive current draw and protect the wiring from overheating. I have some single receptacle circuits and some with two outlets on the same circuit, usually a drop cord from the ceiling. This allows me to plug in a tool underneath when that's convenient like a planer or sander and I don't want to trip over the cords running to the wall. The table saw cord runs to the wall because the drop cord gets in the way for longer boards.

My shop has a 100 AMP panel that is entirely full now, lighting circuits on 15 AMPs, corded tool circuits on 20 AMPs for sanders and powertools like my small bandsaw, oscillating spindle sander and drill presses, about 10 - 220V circuits for the "big machines" and a couple of 30 AMP receptacles for 220V portable space heaters. I did have a 5 HP table saw on one also. The Dust Collector is a 1 1/2 HP Jet that runs on 120V just fine.

The advantage of running on 220V is that you can use 12 GA wire for most of the circuits and that's cheaper, smaller and easier to run and wire up than the heavier gauges like no. 10 and 8. :yes:

You don't want to have your lights and powertools on the same circuit, because a blown breaker will have you working in the dark at night and that could be dangerous.
 
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+1 to what woodenthings said. I put everything I could on 240V. But to your list I would specifically add a planer.
 
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It can depend on the size of the motors. Usually, 3hp and over will require 220. DC, stationary planer, table saw, shaper, larger jointers, drum/edge sanders, larger compressors. You often run the DC while using other machines, you will want a dedicated circuit for the DC but since you don't run the planer at the same time as the saw, those could share a circuit.
 

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If the tool motor can run on either, I plan for 220V. Shops can be using many machines that run on 110V and if the consideration is that in the future a larger one, or a convertible one might replace it, I would plan for 220V.

You often run the DC while using other machines, you will want a dedicated circuit for the DC but since you don't run the planer at the same time as the saw, those could share a circuit.
If your shop has other help, and they may be running tools on the same circuit, I would plan for that condition, or possibility.





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Agree with above, always run 240V where possible, less Amps, easier starting and cooler running.

I run the following on 240V in my home shop, each with a dedicated circuit.

Lathe 30A, because of the inverter or variable frequency drive.

All the rest at 20A

Bandsaw

Table Saw

Shaper

Jointer

Planer

Compressor

Dust collector

My 120V machines share some circuits, like the drill press, combination sander, mortising machine etc.
 

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Believe it or not, some shops use handheld routers that are plug in 220V.




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Interesting, have not seen that before.

I always wonder why folks in the US talk about 220V, because over here we run 240V/480 in England they run 220V/380V, seems like we never get away from Colonial terms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Looks like what everyone is saying is you can't have enough 220 outlets lol. I was planning 5. It's going to be about 540 sq ft space. Maybe I should plan more. I like the idea of having a 220 beside every 110. I just don't want to spend money unnecessarily. I want to have everything I need for the future but not way more than I will need...
 

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When I calculated out costs it mainly came down to "what if I decide I need to add one later"- I quickly decided to spend the extra 2-300 dollars on the extra outlets before insulation, drywall, etc.I am not in my shop now but I think I have 9-10 outlets in my 500 sq ft shop. I can see most of them being used in the distant future.
 

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woodnthings said:
You don't want to have your lights and powertools on the same circuit, because a blown breaker will have you working in the dark at night and that could be dangerous.
Story of my life right now. Everything in my garage is running off of 1 110V 15A circuit. When it blows (not if) I have to turn machines off and turn on the flashlight on my phone before moving.

You can add circuits at a later date. Just run them through conduit on the outside of the wall. It's not as nice looking though.
 

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where's my table saw?
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It can be nice looking

Story of my life right now. Everything in my garage is running off of 1 110V 15A circuit. When it blows (not if) I have to turn machines off and turn on the flashlight on my phone before moving.

You can add circuits at a later date. Just run them through conduit on the outside of the wall. It's not as nice looking though.
For the best looking system plan all the bends to be parallel and spaced a few inches apart on the walls and ceilings.

It's the best answer for a shop since new circuits can be easily added or eliminated or larger wire run through the conduit. My main shop with a lot of 220V for heaters and welders and power tools has the EMT conduit run all around the perimeter. Lights and 3 way switches are by each entry door. They are safely enclosed in the event of a falling piece of metal or equipment.

My woodshop has all the circuits in the drywall and I made sure there were plenty of them!
 

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I ran a 15 amp 220 circuit for my dust collector and a 20 amp 220 circuit for my tablesaw. My tablesaw only draws 7.5 amps on 220...so there's no real need for the 20 amp circuit right now, but in the event I get that 3hp sawstop some day I'll be set. Now I know a lot of guys run multiple 220 outlets on one circuit, but I don't believe that meets code. I've had two inspectors ( in different states) and a lifetime electrician all confirm it's one outlet per 220 circuit.

By the way...not looking to start a debate on this....just recommending you check with your inspector to see if he will allow before spending your time and money only to find out he won't.
 

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woodnthings said:
For the best looking system plan all the bends to be parallel and spaced a few inches apart on the walls and ceilings. It's the best answer for a shop since new circuits can be easily added or eliminated or larger wire run through the conduit. My main shop with a lot of 220V for heaters and welders and power tools has the EMT conduit run all around the perimeter. Lights and 3 way switches are by each entry door. They are safely enclosed in the event of a falling piece of metal or equipment. My woodshop has all the circuits in the drywall and I made sure there were plent of tyhem!
Yep. That's my current plan. I will be painting the walls and adding another 110V circuit specifically for tools. I will likely add a 220V circuit at some point in the future as well. I have 6 spots open in my box so plenty of room.
 
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