Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I built and installed a monument sign for a local montessori school. I transferred printed lettering with carbon paper as a marked up stencil for all the copy, then used a plunge router at a depth of 1/2" to freehand it.

I was pretty proud of it until the owner of the school got there and let me know they were established in 1971.... not 1979 as I had routed into the sign. Doh!! Simple transposition error on my part and I somehow never double checked it.

Any ideas on how I can save this piece? My initial reaction is to some how fill the "9", then re-route a "1" in its place, but I've never tried to fill something with that big of a gap - only small cracks or gaps.

I have a ton of the routed saw dust. Luckily I changed out my dust collection bag in the middle of this project. Do I just mix it with epoxy or glue like I would a small crack? I also plan on sealing it with a couple coats of satin oil-based spar urethane. They'd like it to stay as natural looking as possible, I guess as some secondary advice, please let me know if I am choosing the correct sealant to accomplish that goal.

The slab is beetle kill pine.

Thank you all so much!

Plant Sky Land lot Grass Landscape
Wood Plant Font Building Wall
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,159 Posts
If you try filling in with sawdust it will be much darker. I'm not familiar with outdoor grade filler, maybe they have something you can use.
An alternative would be to dig out the 9 and level the spot. Then find a scrap from this project and use it as a filler shaped like a rectangle then just re-route the "1" .
Or you can use a filler and find some form of paint or other coating and go for an exact color match.
Next time get someone to proof read.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
Epoxy can be tinted to any color, with enough work and a little luck you could nail it. Not hard to test hopefully you have some scrap. Nothing to lose, if it doesn’t work out, you can go with Plan B.

Plan B would be fill the 9 with a grain matched patch of solid wood, then re-route then 1. Maybe make the 9 into a 0 first?

My first thought with a glaring mistake is can a correction be made into a design feature? I usually think of things like a contrasting inlay, etc. For example slightly contrasting inlays for the date and phone numbers. The correction for the 9 won’t be as noticeable.
 

·
Wishing he had a title...
Joined
·
432 Posts
I am with Tony on this. I have never seen filler that didn't look like filler. You can't easily create the grain and same look so that it looks like wood. Unless you have done it before I wouldn't want to practice on this.

I would hollow out a section, glue in a new peice of wood and carve it over. It will probably still show but at least it would match.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,674 Posts
I'm with @DrRobert.

The first thing I thought of was to carve out rectangles for the Est. date and the phone number in the opposite corner and replace them with nice, contrasting wood insert plates. Make the sizes of the rectangles match for visual symmetry.

If anyone asks, say, "You never know when the area code or phone number might change, so I designed it to be replaceable and matched the Est. date on the other side for looks."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
781 Posts
Simple transposition error on my part and I somehow never double checked it.
After you figure out your options, you are going to have to present them to your customer. Ultimately it will be up to him whether to accept your work or not. I would not invest my time and money, going down a path that was not acceptable to the customer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Honestly, what I would do is rout/chisel out a rectangle around the lettering, and inset a thicker contrasting piece with the lettering routed into that, either flush with the rest of the sign or slightly raised. Leave about a 1/16" reveal all around to account for wood movement. I would do the same with the phone number, same height for the rectangle but obviously wider, in case the number changes--and they do sometimes! Then the phone-number rectangle could be replaced in the event the number changes. But you will end up with two matching rectangles, and as I always say, make an error into a design feature! (I would also consider a dark opaque stain for inside the main lettering--it's a bit hard to read with the shadows in them. Then if the inset pieces are darker wood for contrast, you could paint inside the lettering to match the larger plank as well as make them more readable.) Nice work no matter what though!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
733 Posts
As others have said, maybe route out the 9, replace the space with a matching piece of wood--then...here's the good part....carve in a few of those worm holes that are present throughout the rest of it, then route a 1. The worm holes will help disguise any color mismatch or glue lines from the replacement block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
tossing this into the idea pot — there’s a line in the wood below the year and then one above it — not straight lines but places where you can perhaps remove and replace the wood more organically or sneakily as the case may be — then all you have to disguise are the sides — surely you could match a bit of the colors on the sides and do like gj13us suggested — maybe ~
edited to say: so replace the whole “1979” is my idea
edited again to say — by the way it is gorgeous! well done, you!
 
Joined
·
16 Posts
IF you route out the 9 and try to insert a piece to router the number 1 into it, do not make square edges. Use angles and such because it will not draw the eye as much. For an example of what I'm talking about, see my repair project at Not Just Cats & Dogs, Furniture Rescues Need Considerations Too. No one can find the repair.

One of the problems with fillers is it may want to leave the project in time. Then there are the other issues others mentioned.

For me, I might rout out the entire year and add letters wood letters. Essentially relief lettering.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top