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I've heard people talk about a handrubbed finish of oil and wax. What kind of wax(es) do people use?
Thanks, Kevin
 

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I use this http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyID=3235

At $24 for 7 OZ. it may seem pricey, but it lasts forever. Just a tiny dab (size of a small grape) will do a table top. Just keep putting it on and buffing it up. I hate to keep linking this picture in my threads, but that is all that is on it, Tung oil and Renaissance Wax. Smooth as glass. I use the same on walnut too, but figured woods especially, I want it to look like there is no heavy finish on the wood.

Both pictures are the same table, you can see how it works for figured wood. It is so clear it looks dfferent from any angle, the finish is not messing up the effect of the grain.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=105&limit=views
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=352&cat=500&ppuser=11

The second link to my gallery didn't seem to work, don't know if it is my end or what ?
 

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I use Renaissance too...Nuthin' better for figured wood, as you can see.:eek: :thumbsup:

In a pinch I also use pure bee's wax and my Makita heat gun on 3 and work it in while keeping it warm. I like it best on bare 2000 grit sanded maple. No need to over do it either. Small amounts rubbed in warm on warm wood. I usually put 5 or 6 thin coats in and buff each by hand.:eek:nline2long: :eek:nline2long: :eek:nline2long:
 

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There is a Waxoil finish available here in the UK by Osmo, called polyx-oil, that is flooring grade & very durable. I also know a furniture maker who just mixes up pure beeswax thinned with turpentine & linseed oil, shakes it up & rubs it on.
All waxoils produce a finish that is a bit darker than a wax finish, but a bit lighter than an oiled finish. Hope this helps!
 

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Ronnie

I have a walnut desk that I have stripped in my workshop . We have had rain everyday with high humity, with temperatures in the 90's. I have not sealed it, and the wood is turning grey. What do I need to do before applying a wax finish?
 

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I use Tung oil and Paste Wax both made my minwax, they are not the best but they are very reasonably priced and the finish is amazing. I don't use the traditional method, I will use the tung oil and really give a good coating, then rub it off when it gets tacky, do it again and again if you like the more the better.... then I just rub it down with paste wax, giving it a thin layer about the thickness of 3 peices of paper. then let it dry. I then take a 600 grit to it, the wax almost balls up and most of it falls off but what is left on there is finished very smoothly and this works fast. then I go over it with a random orbital buffer and buffing cloth and viola... your done.
On nicer woods I will use better waxes, I like a nice beeswax and Carnauba mix, it is very traditional. I work it the same way.


Check out my website.

www.jrwoodcrafts.com
 

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I use Renaissance too...Nuthin' better for figured wood, as you can see.:eek: :thumbsup:

In a pinch I also use pure bee's wax and my Makita heat gun on 3 and work it in while keeping it warm. I like it best on bare 2000 grit sanded maple. No need to over do it either. Small amounts rubbed in warm on warm wood. I usually put 5 or 6 thin coats in and buff each by hand.:eek:nline2long: :eek:nline2long: :eek:nline2long:
Hey Burlkraft.... the highest grit I can seem to find is 600... can you tell me where to find this 2000 that you speak of????

www.jrwoodcrafts.com
 

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I use this http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyID=3235

At $24 for 7 OZ. it may seem pricey, but it lasts forever. Just a tiny dab (size of a small grape) will do a table top. Just keep putting it on and buffing it up. I hate to keep linking this picture in my threads, but that is all that is on it, Tung oil and Renaissance Wax. Smooth as glass. I use the same on walnut too, but figured woods especially, I want it to look like there is no heavy finish on the wood.

Both pictures are the same table, you can see how it works for figured wood. It is so clear it looks dfferent from any angle, the finish is not messing up the effect of the grain.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=105&limit=views
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=352&cat=500&ppuser=11

The second link to my gallery didn't seem to work, don't know if it is my end or what ?
Darren, That table is great! I love the simplicity of the design and the figure in the wood is beautifull!

www.jrwoodcrafts.com
 
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