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The table comes finished, Virginiamommy07 does not need to finish it. The table is white oak with a polished wax finish. The manufacturer recommends polishing it with beeswax from time to time to maintain the finish. It doesn't matter what anyone thinks of a waxed finish, it's already done. V-mom made a mistake in her first post when she used the term wax paste, instead of paste wax or what the manufacturer specifically states, beeswax. They also say that the customer should expect that the wood will split, stain and, essentially, develop character. It's the intended style and look for this table.
http://www.crateandbarrel.com/big-sur-natural-65-dining-table/s450898
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
How to tell if waxed?

Interesting!

Do you know how I can tell if it is waxed?

The sales person said it was unwaxed, and in previous reviews on the table people complained that it came unwaxed. (They complained because they only learned it had to be waxed after getting water rings, etc on the table.)

However, it being a big box retailer, it's very possible that the salesperson got it wrong and/or they started shipping it waxed because of customer complaints. So now, how do I tell if it's waxed? I've tried their customer service, and they didn't know. The rep looked up their "care sheet," which wasn't helpful at all...unlike this forum. :)


The table comes finished, Virginiamommy07 does not need to finish it. The table is white oak with a polished wax finish. The manufacturer recommends polishing it with beeswax from time to time to maintain the finish. It doesn't matter what anyone thinks of a waxed finish, it's already done. V-mom made a mistake in her first post when she used the term wax paste, instead of paste wax or what the manufacturer specifically states, beeswax. They also say that the customer should expect that the wood will split, stain and, essentially, develop character. It's the intended style and look for this table.
http://www.crateandbarrel.com/big-sur-natural-65-dining-table/s450898
 

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If it has any wax on it you should be able to feel it. The color will also be darker than if it was raw wood. The first review in the link said it stained easily so if it has wax on it, it would be difficult at best to stain. From what I can see I believe it is unfinished.
 

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Interesting!

Do you know how I can tell if it is waxed?

The sales person said it was unwaxed, and in previous reviews on the table people complained that it came unwaxed. (They complained because they only learned it had to be waxed after getting water rings, etc on the table.)

However, it being a big box retailer, it's very possible that the salesperson got it wrong and/or they started shipping it waxed because of customer complaints. So now, how do I tell if it's waxed? I've tried their customer service, and they didn't know. The rep looked up their "care sheet," which wasn't helpful at all...unlike this forum. :)
If you open the manufacturers page, on the right is a column, click on "details and dimensions". It says "polished wax finish allows wood to gain character as it ages". If you click on "care", it says, " use natural beeswax regularly to maintain finish". Seems as if all the necessary information is on the page, if you look.

You can tell if any wax is on the table by a drop of water. It will stay in a bead for a while if wax is present, it will soak in to the wood if there is no wax.

A wax finish on a rustic table like that one will not be evident just by looking. A wax finish will not protect very well against water rings, juice spills and other things that may stain the table. That's why they recommend wiping up spills quickly. Those occasional stains are part of the rustic character some folks like, like an old, well used farm table.

Under "care", it also says, "wood characteristics: grain, knots, pitting, mineral deposits", "seasonal splitting and checking are inherent to this product" and "protect from heat and liquids".

If the table is waxed, that means other finishes will not adhere to the table. Removing wax from a grainy, pitted, checked and knotty surface isn't easy. If you want a table that won't develop "character" don't buy this one.
 

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I'm unsubscribing for this thread. It's just too painful to read the amount of misinformation dished out here.It amazes me how so many can pontificate and bloviate and not ask the OP a single question.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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WOW! The hostility over a simple question.....

virginiamommy07,

You said that you like the "feel" of wood and I got the impression that you wanted to retain that feel. If you put a polyurethane on the table, you will get a plastic feel.

There is an easy to use product that will retain the feel that you prefer. The product is Minwax Antique Oil Finish (MAOF) and comes in a red squarish can, quarts and pints. Some of the home centers carry it as does Ace Hardware. (Ace can order it easier than the home centers if necessary.)

MAOF is applied very thick (Brush, cloth, poured from the can) and after 5 minutes or so the excess is wiped off. The oil and resin varnish penetrates the wood. A second coat is applied 24 hours later. The second coat does not need to be as thick. The finish will smell for a week to ten days. It's a different smell than mineral spirits, turpentine or paint thinner. I find the MAOF smell pleasant and unlike the three mentioned which I find annoying.

The problem with MAOF is that it is not the best protectant especially on a table top. It does retain the feel of the wood that you prefer.

For complete protection (And we're right back where we started from.) the table will have to be waxed. Johnson's Paste Wax, (JPW)yellow can, floor care aisle in the grocery store is great for furniture. You'll probably have to reapply the wax about every 6 months.

There is one other product that can be used, Teak oil. Teak oil for furniture is a wipe on, wipe off product and will need to be done every six months or so. We used it on a teak dining table. The table looked great but the up keep was a real pain. Get the furniture version and NOT the marine version. IIRC the marine version is much thicker so that it can be applied to vertical surfaces and there is no need for wiping. But the marine version remains sticky for a week or two when used inside.

One last thought for you to consider.
When I am making furniture for someone that is giving me a rough time I will finish it with MAOF and then wax it with JPW. I get a little satisfaction knowing that every six months the piece is being waxed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Thanks all! I checked with a supervisor over at C&B. It is supposed to be unfinished, unless it's a floor sample--which I have no idea if it is. So, I'm going to try the water test. If it's not waxed, I think I will try one of the varnish + oil combos. I will poke around first to see if there's a local woodworker who can do this at my house. If not, then I'll DIY it.

Thank you again for your thoughtful anwers. I will post a pic when I'm done.
 
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