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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I bought my first ever table saw the other day, so today I thought that I would give it some protection by waxing it with some cabinet makers wax. I applied the wax and came back in twenty minutes and wiped it off. That was fine, the surface was nice and smooth but 5 hours later I was cutting some timber and after the cut I swept the saw dust off the top of tablesaw top and saw that the sawdust was stuck on to the cast iron table top. I got an old rag and tried to wipe it off but it's not coming off.

Is this a problem, how can I remove the wax from my cast iron tablesaw top?

Thank you,

Jackson
 

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I would use paint thinner

Mineral spirits or paint thinner should work. You could also just buff it out with some steel wool. I don't know why the sawdust stuck to it unless it was on too thick and didn't dry. Try buffing it out first. :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I've just tried that and it works great. When I applied the paint thinner it seemed to make it even smoother than it was before, is that normal?
 

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I don't use wax on machine tops especially if finishing is done in the area. I would use lacquer thinner to remove the wax. Mineral spirits can leave a slight residue, which is mostly from reducing the wax, leaving a fine film.

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Bostik-10220-Aerosol-Top-Cote/dp/B0000223UD/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1388227989&sr=1-1&keywords=top+cote"]Glide Cote[/ame] (used to be Top Cote) works better than wax. BOSTIK® GLIDE COTE® features a unique fluoropolymer technology that dramatically reduces sliding friction on table saws while it repels dust, dirt, moisture and prevents corrosion. Its dry formula contains no silicone or petroleum and it will never stain wood or interfere with glues or finishes.

GlideCote forms a durable, water-repelling dry film on saw tables and tool surfaces to reduce sliding friction and eliminate surface "hang ups." Compared to paste wax, GlideCote is 30% slicker, prevents rust longer and is easier to use.

Benefits:
Contains no silicone
Prevents rust 5 times longer than wax or silicone
Lasts 3 times longer than wax






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The wax you used was fine. The only problem is you let it sit until it solidified on the saw. It's always best to wipe any excess wax off immediately after applying it. If you just clean the excess off with solvents or a heat gun and apply a normal amount of wax you won't have any more problem with it.
 

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I use wax on all my machines. I do finishing using lacquer based products. I have never had a reaction, ever.

A thin coat of wax and then take a cloth and wipe it off until the surface is dry.

It will be slippery and will not collect dust. One $8 can will last more than a year. I use Trewax floor wax but Butchers was is also a good choice. Bowling Alley wax will work well too.
 

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Like Leo, I use wax on every bed and other steel parts. Never had a finishing problem.
 

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Thanks. I've just tried that and it works great. When I applied the paint thinner it seemed to make it even smoother than it was before, is that normal?
i don't use wax, in case you don't get some on the wood and when you sand you don't get all the wax off the finish won't stick their, why don't you get this stuff, that is what is use all on my beds and never any rust, and no wax, it is mfd. by boeing air craft co. here is the link this is the only time i go to sears,

http://www.sears.com/boeshield-t-9-rust-protection-cleaner/p-00928468000P
 

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I use wax on all my machines. I do finishing using lacquer based products. I have never had a reaction, ever.
Like Leo, I use wax on every bed and other steel parts. Never had a finishing problem.
You both have been fortunate so far. If you do get a contamination problem, isolating the exact cause, and eliminating it, and dealing with the consequences in the finish will be difficult.






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I jumped on the Top Cote bandwagon a couple of years ago but I quickly changed my mind. My resukts were a little different that what Ive seen posted here at WWT. It does in fact make the tool really slick. Wood just glides over it like its on air. The negatives are that if you really want to keep your surfaces rust free, you need to reapply this stuff often. I mean, at least once a week. It dosnt seem to last very long at all. I was very surprised to find rust on a brand new band saw table a week after applying this product. If you dont mind reaaplying it often, its a great product. Youll probably have to get a loan to keep buying the stuff though. Its very pricey. I switched to paste wax. I think I paid about 6 bucks for the can I currently have. A year later I still have over half the can left and I dont have any rusted tools. Oh, and Ive yet to experience any finishing problems other than my owl lack of finishing skill. My understanding is that wax isnt the issue, its silicone within the wax. Just buy a wax that dosnt contain silicone.
 

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The small amount of wax on the tables/beds of your tools isn't likely to affect your finish.
 

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I think the issue with wax is how one uses it. I've seen people smear wax all over a machine top and then start sawing. I could see the first board or two picking up enough wax to cause a problem with a finish in that circumstance. I've always applied wax and then wiped it off with a clean rag and have never had any problem. I've even worked for other shops that used silicone spray lubricant on their machinery. Even then the effects of fisheye was negligible.
 

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There are hundreds of different waxes. Some have a vegetable source (carnauba palm), some are mineral (most taper candles). Some of the "hardness" is contributed by the sodium stearate content in the final mix. Some of the hardness is contributed by the sheer lengths of hydrocarbon chains in the molecules. . . . the mineral waxes being the longest, by far.

Consequently, top quality table candle tapers have harder waxes so the don't melt down from the flame as easily and drool all over the hostess' heirloom, hand woven, linen table cloth. Yes?
Use one of those and just scribble on the table saw surface, a bunch of X and Y. You are not expected to be painting a toilet seat.

Any wax solvent will clean off your TS well enough. Test the result with a handful of sawdust. Was that not the issue?

Good luck with it. The wax does not need to be some uniform coating at all. Try that.
 

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if you apply a wax, and it wears off, it likely went on the wood, yes/no!?! unless it is sanded off, it potentially will effect the finish process. since finishing is my least desirable phase of woodworking, i don't do anything to jeopardise it. i've been using top cote for several years and very satisfied.
 

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I use wax on all my machines. I do finishing using lacquer based products. I have never had a reaction, ever.

A thin coat of wax and then take a cloth and wipe it off until the surface is dry.

It will be slippery and will not collect dust. One $8 can will last more than a year. I use Trewax floor wax but Butchers was is also a good choice. Bowling Alley wax will work well too.
+1, I do not even wipe it off.
 

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Waxes without silicone are still a barrier coating. That's their purpose. Most finishes don't stick to a waxed surface.










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My father use to finish most of his pieces with mineral oil and paste wax, which as you know is not very durable. Many applications over several years during his life and then mine. Where some pieces had water spot damage, I did a light wipe with lacquer thinners and sprayed with lacquer. No negative effects from the wax or the oil and ten years later the lacquer finish has held up still in perfect condition. I can understand that there will be issues with WB coatings, but some solvent based coatings are very forgiving.
 
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