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I have been around woodworking for more than 60 years.
Once upon a time there was a wood glue that one side of the wood was wet down and on the mate side was the actual glue.
When pressed together and clamped, the wet side would draw into it some of the glue.
If you tried to break the joint the wood would break alongside it but not at the joint.
It actually fused the wood.
NOW,
does anybody know what I am describing and know where I can get some
OR
because it was so good they stopped making it?
Please advise.
Cap'n
 

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There are a lot of glues you wet the wood and penetrate. ..
 

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We used a lot of Titebond polyurethane glues at the furniture company. We use to buy pallets of the stuff..

I'm not fond of it but sometimes I must obey master...
Glasses Eye Lighting Fawn Wood
Bottle Hand Liquid Fluid Drink
 

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Thanks for the tip.
You will find with research there are a lot of specialty glues on the market. I continuously find new glues I haven't seen year after year. Manufacturers are continuously upping their game

I've got to reattached my rear mirror. There's a glue for that. Unreal....
 

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Gorilla Glue (original) is a polyurethane glue. They recommend that you wet one or both sides. Polyurethane glue foams up as it cures. If your glue did not foam up, then it was not polyurethane. The reason I mention Gorilla Glue is that you can buy a small bottle for less than $5 at nearly any store (Walmart, Home Depot, maybe the pharmacy, etc.) and try it out on scrap wood to see if you like it.
https://www.gorillatough.com/product/original-gorilla-glue/

I use polyurethane glue for glueing brass tubes into pen blanks for woodturning. I wet the inside of the hole (wood) first, apply the glue to the tube, and then insert the gluey tube with twisting/in-out motion to spread the glue.

Another new glue that matches your description is Clear Gorilla Glue, which is a silane-based glue. It is also activated with water, but does not foam. It is strong and dries clear. You can find it at Home Depot or Walmart. One minor issue with it is that you should store in the light, or it may yellow. Really.
https://www.gorillatough.com/product/clear-gorilla-glue/

Both yield bonds that are stronger than wood, but neither bonds as strong as ordinary wood glue, like Titebond Original, II, or III.
http://titebond.com/community/the-big-three
 

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We used it because of the rush. When they run behind, or didn't have enough tops for an order they use it..
 

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Does polyurethane glue affect finishing?

I have some, never used it, but can't seem to find any reason to use instead of wood glue.
 

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Not that Im aware of...

We used it when we needed a top that day...
 

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Does polyurethane glue affect finishing?

I have some, never used it, but can't seem to find any reason to use instead of wood glue.
Not that Im aware of...

We used it when we needed a top that day...
The foaming action can result in more squeeze-out. It is waterproof, so dried glue won't take a finish.

I never use it for ordinary woodworking. Wood glue is much stronger, less messy and easier to clean up. Wood glue does not require water to activate. (For most woods, you don't have to wet them for polyurethane, but it helps.) I don't understand @Rebelwork's comment "... we needed a top that day ..." because polyurethane takes 24 hours for a full cure, essentially the same as wood glue.

The only place I use polyurethane glue is pen making - for glueing brass tubes in pen blanks. The foaming action fills the gaps from imperfect drilling. Foamed polyurethane glue in the gaps is weak, but that's okay for how I use it.

For household repairs with a variety of materials, polyurethane glue is okay. CA glue is fast and may be a better choice for quick repairs, or consider Clear Gorilla Glue (silane-based), which does not foam.
 

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,Water makes it foam . You have to sand before you finish..
 

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The foaming action can result in more squeeze-out. It is waterproof, so dried glue won't take a finish.

I never use it for ordinary woodworking. Wood glue is much stronger, less messy and easier to clean up. Wood glue does not require water to activate. (For most woods, you don't have to wet them for polyurethane, but it helps.) I don't understand @Rebelwork's comment "... we needed a top that day ..." because polyurethane takes 24 hours for a full cure, essentially the same as wood glue.

The only place I use polyurethane glue is pen making - for glueing brass tubes in pen blanks. The foaming action fills the gaps from imperfect drilling. Foamed polyurethane glue in the gaps is weak, but that's okay for how I use it.

For household repairs with a variety of materials, polyurethane glue is okay. CA glue is fast and may be a better choice for quick repairs, or consider Clear Gorilla Glue (silane-based), which does not foam.
I just do what I'm told. They want this glue on this top. Once it stops foaming and dries its ready to be sanded and finished.

I would suggest you #1 become a furniture maker, #2 go to work for a 10 million dollar a year furniture company and argue with the people above you.

I remember when I applied for the furniture maker position. The plant manager and foreman had two weeks to look at the job they needed done. They finally had reached jobs beyond there skill level and had several cabinet makers interviewed. They had researched youtube and had reach a lot of information o the subject and had decided the plan of attack.

I went to the internet and showed some of my work and got asked the question.

After the question, I answered. I was hired. I beat out a lot of cabinet makers in KC for that job. The worked I showed was my poker tables.

Point being... you don't always have to understand...
 

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I just do what I'm told. They want this glue on this top. Once it stops foaming and dries its ready to be sanded and finished.

I would suggest you #1 become a furniture maker, #2 go to work for a 10 million dollar a year furniture company and argue with the people above you.

I remember when I applied for the furniture maker position. The plant manager and foreman had two weeks to look at the job they needed done. They finally had reached jobs beyond there skill level and had several cabinet makers interviewed. They had researched youtube and had reach a lot of information o the subject and had decided the plan of attack.

I went to the internet and showed some of my work and got asked the question.

After the question, I answered. I was hired. I beat out a lot of cabinet makers in KC for that job. The worked I showed was my poker tables.

Point being... you don't always have to understand...
I don't deserve that. I think you misunderstood my comments. "I don't understand" means I don't understand. It doesn't mean "Rebelwork did something wrong" and it is not a sign of disrespect. In fact, I have a great respect and admiration for you and your real-world, day-in-day-out, full-time woodworking experience. I cannot compete with that. I have built some one-off pieces of furniture, but I acknowledge that it is not the same. I read and value your posts in the other threads, and interpret them with the view they come from someone with a deep knowledge and understanding of woodworking. That's how I read them before, and it is how I continue to read them, okay?

I have worked in places where the boss directed me to do things that didn't make sense. It is a common human experience, but you didn't say anything about that until now, okay?

You said, "We used it when we needed a top that day..." and a reasonable interpretation might be, "I chose polyurethane because it can be used to make a top quickly." That is what I did not understand - the implied faster speed of polyurethane over regular wood glue.

My comment was written to show that polyurethane is comparable to wood glue in terms of set, dry, and cure timing. I added an explanation of where polyurethane glue is useful, and suggested alternatives. That's all.

Please re-read my post above.
 

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I'm not trying to be mean, I just dont always make the rules. I generally make the rules, but sometimes I'm out ranked. It's a owner employee thing.

As I stated earlier. I dont care to use it.

If I read something wrong, I apologize...
 

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I'll put it to you this way.
When the foam dries it goes through the sander without a problem. On titebond 2 it has popped a board off from heat.

The glues ain't the same. They may read the same but the ain't the same..

We were in direct contact with Titebond.
 
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