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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys:

I am trying to used water-based polyurethane on basswood surfaces and would like to know if you can modify the procedure to give the final finish a cloudy/misty look? Basically I'm looking to not have a crystal clear finish that water based poly typically achieve, but still have the grain pattern show a little bit.

Do you think sanding differently between coats will do something?

Any Ideas?

Cheers,

Michael tx
 

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Hi guys:

I am trying to used water-based polyurethane on basswood surfaces and would like to know if you can modify the procedure to give the final finish a cloudy/misty look? Basically I'm looking to not have a crystal clear finish that water based poly typically achieve, but still have the grain pattern show a little bit.

Do you think sanding differently between coats will do something?

Any Ideas?

Cheers,

Michael tx
Sanding between coats won't do anything to to cloud the finish. You can add a small amount of white latex paint to the polycrylic to cloud the finish. Just start off with too little and gradually add the paint until you get the look you want. It doesn't take much. Try some samples on scrap wood first. If the color is too white you can add a yellow oxide color tint or use a antique white paint.

When you get the formula figured out I would use the finish clear until you get the wood smoothed out from the grain being raised by the water. Then put a coat of the cloudy finish on and continue with a clear over the top. Once you put the cloudy finish on be especially careful sanding between coats as any sand through, you won't be able to touch up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sanding between coats won't do anything to to cloud the finish. You can add a small amount of white latex paint to the polycrylic to cloud the finish. Just start off with too little and gradually add the paint until you get the look you want. It doesn't take much. Try some samples on scrap wood first. If the color is too white you can add a yellow oxide color tint or use a antique white paint.

When you get the formula figured out I would use the finish clear until you get the wood smoothed out from the grain being raised by the water. Then put a coat of the cloudy finish on and continue with a clear over the top. Once you put the cloudy finish on be especially careful sanding between coats as any sand through, you won't be able to touch up.



Any specific white latex paint in mind? or any from likes of Home Depot will do?

BTW, I use Water-Based Polycrylic finish from Minwax, in case if any specification matters when mixed with other chemicals.

Thanks always,

Michael
 

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I would just use what ever latex paint you happen to have on hand. It doesn't matter if it's wall paint or trim paint. All you are using out of it is the white pigment.
 
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