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Can Watco Danish Oil Natural (clear) be applied to an already stained wood? Sorry if this is a dumb question, but the directions seem to indicate it should only be used on bare wood. I would understand this for the Watco that contains stain, but what about the clear? Thanks for your input.
 

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No, if the stain an oil based pigment stain like Minwax Wood Finish. Oil based stains contain a varnish binder to sort of glue the pigment to the wood surface. When this binder dried, it effectively seals the pores and the surface of the wood.

Watco an oil/varnish mixture designed to be absorbed into the wood. As the stain has sealed the surface, the Watco will not be absorbed and will not dry properly.

There are a number of clear finishes that can be used over a stain. I would suggest an oil based or waterborne poly. Either is more protective than Watco.
 

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While not as effective as putting the watco on bare wood I don't see any reason it couldn't be done. The watco is just a very thin varnish and oil mixture and the pores of the stained wood are not completely plugged with the stain. You would certainly get more protection from polyurethane than the watco anyway.
 

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sactogator said:
Thanks Howie, that answers my question. I was actually looking at an oil-based poly as an alternative.
I put Watco over almost everything. One coat of stain would only help you get a good build going.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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Steve, Watco is designed to be applied and then wiped dry after letting it set for 15-20 minutes. If it is applied over an already sealed surface, the finish will not penetrate the sealed surface and it will remain on top of the surface. When the excess is wiped off, little to no Watco will remain. So what has been accomplished?

To see that Watco does not "dry" to a hard finish, just apply some onto a non-porous surface and let it set for a day or so. After that time give it the thumbnail test. You will see it is quite soft.

It's really not much of a finish. It's about 75% thinner. The balance is made up of raw linseed oil, vegetable oil and a small amount of a resin.
 

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Steve, Watco is designed to be applied and then wiped dry after letting it set for 15-20 minutes. If it is applied over an already sealed surface, the finish will not penetrate the sealed surface and it will remain on top of the surface. When the excess is wiped off, little to no Watco will remain. So what has been accomplished?

To see that Watco does not "dry" to a hard finish, just apply some onto a non-porous surface and let it set for a day or so. After that time give it the thumbnail test. You will see it is quite soft.

It's really not much of a finish. It's about 75% thinner. The balance is made up of raw linseed oil, vegetable oil and a small amount of a resin.
The way I read the post is he was asking about applying watco over wood stain, not poly. I would agree that watco wouldn't go over a film finish.
 

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HowardAcheson said:
Steve, Watco is designed to be applied and then wiped dry after letting it set for 15-20 minutes. If it is applied over an already sealed surface, the finish will not penetrate the sealed surface and it will remain on top of the surface. When the excess is wiped off, little to no Watco will remain. So what has been accomplished?

To see that Watco does not "dry" to a hard finish, just apply some onto a non-porous surface and let it set for a day or so. After that time give it the thumbnail test. You will see it is quite soft.

It's really not much of a finish. It's about 75% thinner. The balance is made up of raw linseed oil, vegetable oil and a small amount of a resin.
Howard with all due respect. I've been using Watco for over 30 years. While I don't use polycrapoline. I have put Watco over other stains and varnishes. Your really not giving the finish it's due. It does in fact dry and it's been on the kitchen table for 20 years. It is a hard finish because of what it does to the wood, unlike poly that sits on the top to form a hard brittle plastic finish. You do realize it requires more than one coat.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 
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