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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have never really used a glued on waste block. Can I apply about a 1 inch ring of glue outside of the faceplate area to hold the waste block to the work piece and then turn the waste block down to free the workpiece? I am going to make a platter so it will only be holding a 10-12" 3/4 inch work piece.

Thanks
 

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If you use hot glue you can do that. In fact hot glue doesn't work if you put glue on the face and then push the 2 faces together. Just doesn't hold very well. I prefinish the back and then hot glue the glue block to the wood with a substantial bead around the outside. Then cut most of it away with the parting tool. If you cut it all away the platter goes flying. I use steel wire or fishing line between two handles with the lathe off and sort of saw through the glue joint to remove the platter. Sometimes you can peel the glue off with your finger nails. If you don't get it all off you can clean it off with alcohol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I do not have hot glue gun (that will work for that) so maybe I should just try the paper joint. I know there are videos on that, so I will check that out.
 

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I have a hot glue gun, but prefer to use a paper joint.

No need to look at videos. Cut a piece of paper the size of the glue block and then apply glue to both surfaces.

If I am in a hurry I apply CA glue to the glue block, then the paper, then CA to the top of the paper and then attach to the wood blank and then spray on a little accelerator.

If I am not in a hurry I use yellow glue and let this cure overnight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a hot glue gun, but prefer to use a paper joint.

No need to look at videos. Cut a piece of paper the size of the glue block and then apply glue to both surfaces.

If I am in a hurry I apply CA glue to the glue block, then the paper, then CA to the top of the paper and then attach to the wood blank and then spray on a little accelerator.

If I am not in a hurry I use yellow glue and let this cure overnight.
Hahaha, yeah, I watched a short video. Not exactly rocket science. Thanks for the tip about CA glue.
 

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I do pretty much what you describe. I just glue the block on (in my case tapped with a beal tap to fit my spindle) with a lot of glue (Titebond II) and then turn the glue block down when I part off the bowl. I have used the paper method for making quarter round fluted columns, and it worked great, but the one time I tried it for a bowl, the paper separated (left fibers on the glue block and the bowl). I probably used the wrong paper though (grocery store brown paper).
 

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All of the above have some problems. A piece glued directly to the bowl blank with yellow glue (if the wood is dry) is the most solid. CA with accelorator is the weakest. A good catch can pop the bowl off. The paper joint is stronger. Hot glue around the edges I believe is as strong as the paper joint.
All have the problem of removing the remaining glue. You can sand it off of course but you can get a rocking foot if your not real careful. The Hot glue with patience comes off leaving a clean joint.
What I do is glue the blank to the wood, turn my bowl and then use a parting tool to cut through the waste block and blue joint. I cut so I am wasting wood mostlly on my glue block but the parting tool is cutting away the glue. Part down until there is just a small tenon left and then stop the lathe and cut this off with a hand saw. Then carve and sand away the rest.
An even better way is to reverse the bowl and turn the bottom. That's what most of us do.
 

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All of the above have some problems. A piece glued directly to the bowl blank with yellow glue (if the wood is dry) is the most solid. CA with accelorator is the weakest. A good catch can pop the bowl off. The paper joint is stronger. Hot glue around the edges I believe is as strong as the paper joint.
All have the problem of removing the remaining glue. You can sand it off of course but you can get a rocking foot if your not real careful. The Hot glue with patience comes off leaving a clean joint.
What I do is glue the blank to the wood, turn my bowl and then use a parting tool to cut through the waste block and blue joint. I cut so I am wasting wood mostlly on my glue block but the parting tool is cutting away the glue. Part down until there is just a small tenon left and then stop the lathe and cut this off with a hand saw. Then carve and sand away the rest.
An even better way is to reverse the bowl and turn the bottom. That's what most of us do.
 

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Using wood glue I glue my project to the glue block. When I am ready to part it off I take it to the bandsaw and cut it off. I made this jig to cut them off and other things too. Using the jig the cut is smooth with just a little sanding. You can't cut everything off on the bandsaw but it's nice when you can.

 

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All of the above have some problems. A piece glued directly to the bowl blank with yellow glue (if the wood is dry) is the most solid. CA with accelorator is the weakest. A good catch can pop the bowl off. The paper joint is stronger. Hot glue around the edges I believe is as strong as the paper joint.
All have the problem of removing the remaining glue. You can sand it off of course but you can get a rocking foot if your not real careful. The Hot glue with patience comes off leaving a clean joint.
What I do is glue the blank to the wood, turn my bowl and then use a parting tool to cut through the waste block and blue joint. I cut so I am wasting wood mostlly on my glue block but the parting tool is cutting away the glue. Part down until there is just a small tenon left and then stop the lathe and cut this off with a hand saw. Then carve and sand away the rest.
An even better way is to reverse the bowl and turn the bottom. That's what most of us do.
Ditto
 

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I use brown paper and a thin coat of Elmers white glue. It seems to hold well and the joints part with a chisel. It seems to split the paper right down the middle leaving a thin layer of paper on each side of the split. Never ceases to amaze me.
 
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