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Dust Maker
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Discussion Starter #1
I have an old washstand that I am planning to add a vessel sink to the top and use as a vanity for a quest of basement bathroom. This old piece of furniture has been rebuilt before or cobbled together from several pieces prior to our ownership. The feet are 1.5x1.5 oak straight legs. Sometime in it's life it had casters, I believe based on the metal caps on the bottom of the legs.

https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=378021&thumb=1

We have kept this on carpet so it has not been an issue. The washstands new home will be on a tile floor. I will add a nail rail of sorts to secure/mount it to wall similar to a vanity. In addition the current height of the top of the vanity is about 30.5 inches. The vessel sink is about 6" deep. My question is what is best approach to deal with these ugly feet? I had considered pulling the caps off and adding an inch or two to the bottom to raise the top a bit. I had also thought about purchasing some wheels to place in these holes and still mount to the wall bit the wheels on the tile. Thoughts?

Second question is regarding the mirror. It is currently 2 pieces, a beveled glass and a mirror that rests behind the beveled glass.

https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=378023&thumb=1

https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=378025&thumb=1

There is about an 1/8 of an inch or less reveal round the back edge of the frame. When mirror and glass are installed. I had some finish nails precariously stuck in to hold it. Sorry I failed to get a picture with the glass and mirror installed. I can clean this up with some shimming and plywood or some PVC slats I have. My question is are there some better methods now to maintaining the beveled glass mirror look without stacking the mirror under the glass?


I thank you for your help and suggestions
 

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Village Idiot
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For the first, i think youre on the right track with yanking off the caps and extending the legs. Honestly were it doable making new legs would be the best bet, but i dunno if thats possible on your piece.

As to the second, that is a really, REALLY weird mirror arrangement. Id take the measurements to a local glass shop and seeing what the cost would be to just get a mirror with beveled edges, skip all that stacking nonsense. I doubt itll be cost prohibitive, and will be less of a PITA
 

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where's my table saw?
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Weird photo ......



I wish folks would take the time to place the object of discussion in front of a blank/bare wall or hang a bedsheet over the objects that have no relevance in the background. This Shop Fox Jointer is either a scale model OR the night stand is a monster. I have no feel for where the mirror sits in the frame with the gaps as explained.

Straight on front views give no sense of depth or thickness.



The second photo is also mysterious. What is the piece with the grids to the left of the beveled glass?


How about a photo detail of the leg construction/attachment so we can determine whether extending the legs would be a viable approach?
:vs_cool:
 

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I wish folks would take the time to place the object of discussion in front of a blank/bare wall or hang a bedsheet over the objects that have no relevance in the background. This Shop Fox Jointer is either a scale model OR the night stand is a monster. I have no feel for where the mirror sits in the frame with the gaps as explained.

Straight on front views give no sense of depth or thickness.



The second photo is also mysterious. What is the piece with the grids to the left of the beveled glass?


How about a photo detail of the leg construction/attachment so we can determine whether extending the legs would be a viable approach?
:vs_cool:

I agree. The only photo that I can tell anything about is the one of the end of the leg with the old metal insert.


That last photo does not look anything like an object I would expect from the discussion.


George
 

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If it were me I would remove the caster insert from the legs and fill the holes with dowels. Then because a bath floor gets wet put nylon tacks on the bottom of the legs to elevate the cabinet a quarter of an inch or so from the floor. Can't tell from the picture, if it's red oak getting it wet causes it to turn black.

Since the height is a little low you might consider extending the length of the legs and put a piece of trim around the seam and at the bottom. Once done it should look like it was always like that. The trend today is to make vanities 36" tall so if you have enough height with the mirror you might try to get closer to that.

The mirror, usually those the glass is held in by corner blocks with a back to cover the opening. If you're mirror is anything like that you might just leave the back off so it will fit flush with the wall. The frame could also have the mounting brackets removed and attached to the wall. You could use something like keyhole hangers to mount the components. That way if you needed to get to the glass or remove everything to paint it should make it easy.
 

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Dust Maker
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the feedback.

Photo issues noted I will attempt to do better. Looked fine to me since I was there with them! The funky picture with the grids on the left is actually the mirror reflecting the drop ceiling in my basement. To the mirrors right is the beveled glass that was on top of the mirror when placed in the frame. The thing leaning against the jointer is the back of the wash stand that attaches to the case. The frame in the middle is where the mirror mounts.


I'll get back to the workshop soon and take some additional pictures.
 
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