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Hey all, I'm halfway thru a solid walnut bedframe build and I noticed that the wood I planed to use for my headboard has bowed. Its 75"x15"x1.5"
Do you think it will straighten when I screw it into the posts?
Any advice on how to straighten it up?
Should I run a piece of wood behind it to try to pull it straight? - I don't think ill be able to fit anything thicker than 1" behind it so not sure that will do much.
Thanks for any advice!

Its a very simple design:
428347


428345

428346
 

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Do you need the full length?
 

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No more space than you have about the only fix would be to screw a piece of angle iron to the back of it. What would have been better would have been to use a board at least an inch thick and you have to be careful to select a board that is straight. I will sometimes dig through an entire stack of wood to find a straight one.
 

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You can also fix it by cutting it down the length, ripping it, into thirds. Alternate the center piece so the warp is opposing the top and bottom and glue it back together.
 

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You can also fix it by cutting it down the length, ripping it, into thirds. Alternate the center piece so the warp is opposing the top and bottom and glue it back together.
I've never done this before, have you had good long term success with this?
 

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I've never done this before, have you had good long term success with this?
Not so much if it's hooked on the end. By the time you put it back together you can have #1.... funny looking grain. #2.... thinner piece as it probably will have to be planed.....3.... you might have very noticeable glue joints if it wasn't prepared correctly..
 

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I've never done this before, have you had good long term success with this?
It will have a goofy looking grain pattern and your chances of not getting it glued up even are pretty good as well. It's always a measure of last resort.
But there's another way to "fix" a warped board with a hook or gradual curve. Kerfing is a technique for bending wood and it will also work for unbending wood that's warped. The wood needs to open opposite the curve so you would kerf it on the back side, fill the small slots with thin wood strips glued in. Again, there's no guarantee, but warped wood is not much good for fine furniture anyway.
 
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Why not just use it like it is? You may have to tweak your joints where it meets the posts by a degree or two but it wouldn't bother me. If it did, I'd make a cap for the upper edge so I wouldn't notice it so much.
 

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I see this is nearly a month old. Sorry this is so late. The initial pic of the plan shows long board mounted on crow posts. If that span is going to be 75” I would expect more flex on the headboard than I would like. Consider adding another post o two. That may take the flex out and could help with correcting the warp.

if you already completed the project, please share the results. The suspense is killing me. Wondering what worked.
 

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where's my table saw?
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It will have a goofy looking grain pattern and your chances of not getting it glued up even are pretty good as well. It's always a measure of last resort.
But there's another way to "fix" a warped board with a hook or gradual curve. Kerfing is a technique for bending wood and it will also work for unbending wood that's warped. The wood needs to open opposite the curve so you would kerf it on the back side, fill the small slots with thin wood strips glued in. Again, there's no guarantee, but warped wood is not much good for fine furniture anyway.
Quoting myself ^ .... and reconsidering the grain issue, here's what I would do:
Resaw the board down it's length into two equal thicknesses. Resawing is vertically ripping down the length with the board on edge. You will need a bandsaw with enough depth of cut OR find a shop who will do it. Most serious woodworkers will have such a bandsaw.
Glue the pieces back together, but flip one end for end, 180 degrees.
Put the "best face" forward and outfacing.
By flipping the one piece it will oppose the warps and "it should" end up a whole lot flatter and straighter.
I've never done exactly this, but everything I know tells me it should work. o_O
 

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Hey all, I'm halfway thru a solid walnut bedframe build and I noticed that the wood I planed to use for my headboard has bowed. Its 75"x15"x1.5"
Do you think it will straighten when I screw it into the posts?
Any advice on how to straighten it up?
Should I run a piece of wood behind it to try to pull it straight? - I don't think ill be able to fit anything thicker than 1" behind it so not sure that will do much.
Thanks for any advice!

Its a very simple design:
View attachment 428347

View attachment 428345
View attachment 428346
If the wood was sufficiently dried, did you let it acclimate to your shop before working it? Did you flatten it with a jointer and sticker it? Wood has a natural tension within it and I have found I have to work with what the tree has given me. I partle agree with what another writer wrote, but not completely. Depending on the width of your jointer I would rip the boards to fit the jointer bed. I would mark the ends with triangles to maintain orientation and wood grain. O would joint the wood, plane it, and glue it back up in the same orientation. You may be able to do the glue up first depending on the size of your planer. I would not flip the boards as you will lose the grain orientation and it will likely look like glued up boards instead of a single board.
 
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