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Hello, this may be a stupid question, but I'll ask it anyhow. I make table coffee tables and end tables in my small shop. I don't have very many tools, but I work with what I've got. When it comes to joining boards together for the tops, I use biscuits and glue. I clamp them toegther as best as I can them leave it overnight. The next day, the boards are often cupped or twisted a little. Is there anyway to fix this after the boards are all glued and joined toegther. I don't have access to a planer or joiner and I know this may be a problem. When I pick out boards I just try to pick out the straightest ones. I'd appreciate any suggestions or input from anyone willing to help.
Thanks,
-C.G.
 

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I will answer your question with a question, what kinda wood ? And if you are forcing them together with clamps to close any gaps, something is going to give. They can be straight edged on the table saw (got one ?)
I would lean towards wood that is not dry maybe, if it is cupping and twisting.
 

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As Daren mentioned if the wood is not dry that would be the more obvious culprit, also if the boards were twisted to begin with. Even slightly, it will be a losing battle without the use of a jointer/planer.
Red oak is notorious for cupping when glued up as a large blank.

Do you use bread boards on the ends? Do you alternate grain patterns when you lay the boards out? Fresh cut ends that sit in any kind of humidity is going to absorb moisture too. How wide are the individual boards you're gluing up? Gee can you guess I've fought the dragon a few times?
 

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CG.
I also used to have the same problem however mine was because of the point that Joesdad said in his post. Like he said always alternate grain patterns on the end boards I let my wood sit in my shop for sometime before I use it for a table top.

Bruce.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks for the advice

Hello, 1st off thanks for all the advice. I posted the thread early tonight and already have lots of responses. Your help really helped me to remeber all that I was taught in my woodworking highschool class. I usually use maple or red oak so maybe that's one problem as somebody said. I do have a table saw but it's a small portable one. (it's accurate but, not perfect.) Is there any way to but wood that's not as dry?
Thanks again,
-C.G.
 

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You need to acclimate any wood to the enviroment is is going to be in. Even wood that has been kiln dried and finished such as hardwood flooring, will shrink or expand and warp if not acclimated correctley. I like to bring material into the shop a week or so before I begin to work with it. Keep it off concrete floors, stacking it on a rack will allow it to acclimate better then piled on a bench. I always take the light plastic wrap and bundle things like the stile and rail stock that has just been ripped. I make a couple of wraps on each end and one in the middle. The logic is that the wood grain is now open by the saw passes or planing and moisture that was still traped will make the wood do some funny things. The conditions change when wood is cut, the stress from the grain can make a board curl off in one direction as it is being cut. The biggest thing is acclimation.
 
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