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Discussion Starter #1
I've read a couple of accounts that say warming lacquer to about 90degrees before spraying makes it level better and set up faster. Would this really be the case if the item being sprayed isn't also the same temperature?
 

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Yes, it'll set up faster. No, it won't level better. Yes, the temperature of the item being sprayed matters too.

The best results will be if both are in the middle of the temperature range specified on the can.
 

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If you're using rattle cans and want to warm them safely I would just get some warm water in a pan and set the can in for a bit. That should be relatively safe.

David

You could do the same thing with standard liquid lacquer. Just take more and hotter water.


George
 

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I've read a couple of accounts that say warming lacquer to about 90degrees before spraying makes it level better and set up faster. Would this really be the case if the item being sprayed isn't also the same temperature?
You can go over a hundred degrees with it. It's an acceptable method of thinning it without solvents. It allows you to build a finish quicker.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Steve,

This make a lot of sense.

Would you agree that it would make very little sense to warm rattle can lacquer since it’s already pretty thin?
 

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Steve,

This make a lot of sense.

Would you agree that it would make very little sense to warm rattle can lacquer since it’s already pretty thin?
You are right rattle can lacquer is thinner and contains retarder thinner so it wouldn't make sense to warm it. In addition heating rattle can lacquer could cause it to expel the propellant making the can useless. You know it would build pressure when heated.
 
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