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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I want to make a small park bench style bench for our backyard from a dead tree that I cut down. I'm pretty sure I have enough branches to make the bench, but I'm not sure what's the best method of fastening them to each other. I want this bench to last as long as possible.

Should I use carriage bolts, or lag screws to attach the pieces to each other? Or maybe a combination of both? The branches are around 2 inches in diameter for the most part.. Some being a bit bigger. Thanks for the help!
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Not that its not possible.....but i'm not seeing enough structurally sound wood there......
 

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bobgodd said:
For the sake of discussion, let's assume I did. Which would be the preferred fastener?

Here is a video for it
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
That tenon cutter is nice but probably (definitely) not necessary for my purposes. This project really isn't necessary, and if it actually turns out to be a bench we can actually use we still wouldn't use it all that often. It's more of a sentimental type thing.. My wife was sad to see the tree go, but since I had the branches I thought maybe I can so something with these.

Maybe if a bench is a bad idea, you all could lend me a better idea?? Thanks again for the help!

Edit: I meant the tenon cutter is not necessary because I don't have the money to spend on it lol. I really just wanted to find a creative cheap easy way to make use of the logs. That is definitely something I'll consider for the future though.
 

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If you are looking to make something with sentimental value, think about some sort of wall hanging or even a rustic picture frame using the branches. Could also make a wall attached coat hanger..............
 

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Hunter
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A really cheap and still effective tenon cutter is a deep hole saw and a reciprocating saw. Clamp the branch well and then cut the tenon with the hole saw. You will have to trim the excess with a reciprocating saw or even a hand saw.

I worked for a company that built thousands of log beds and hundreds of feet of log banister that way. That was before anyone thought about a cutter that did it all in one step.

Hunter
 

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There is definitely a rustic style bench in that pile. Pre drill and use treated hardware like stainless bolts to prevent rusting. Not sure about comfort but I've sat on a lot of bumpy logs around campfires...
Just start laying it out
 

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Research Lashed Chair to see if it is something that would work for you for a rustic look. Although not usually mentioned, a clove hitch and or constrictor knot may be useful.
 
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