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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We just purchased a new walnut dining room table. On the day of delivery, just after the delivery folks left, I damaged the top removing the leaf. After my wife finished beating me with a stick, I convinced her to allow me to try and fix the damage. I'll post pictures before the damage and of what I have done so far.

Table: Solid Walnut extension dining table with lacquer finish. Lacquer appears to have a satin finish.

Damage: An impact to the side of the table top where the leaf fits in, denting the side and lifting a shard of wood from the surface of the top. The damage is about 1-2" long, right along the corner of the table top surface. The shard was still connected to the surface. The finish appeared to have been fractured by the impact.

Actions taken so far: I've used Tite-Bond Molding and Trim glue to glue the shard back down flush with the top. It was glued about 48 hours ago, and clamped down using shims for about 24 hours. This has returned the shard flush with the top. Excess glue was wiped free of the area with a damp cloth prior to clamping.

Next steps: There is still some discoloration around the fracture zone. The finish appears to have been craked here, and this has made it milky white arround the crack. I need to get this area to match the finish of the rest of the table.

I was thinking of trying reamalgamation using lacquer thinner. I don't want to do anything that's irreversible, and would prefer not to refinish the entire top over such a small defect. I'm hopeful that a local repair job will make this look pretty good.

Advice Appreciated. Thanks. Charlie
 

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If it is a satin finish try (in an inconspicuous spot, like where the leaves some together and it would be hidden) buffing it out first. It looks like you made the wood flush again. Maybe some 400 (or 600) grit sandpaper, then furniture polish? They make that kind that has color to blend scratches/dings, get some walnut color and try it. I have not used it and can't off the top of my head remember the name, but know they sell it at any hardware store (ACE).

I would be too chicken to start out with thinner. If you do here is a link with some instructions, I cannot vouch for the technique, I just found the link. http://truevalue.com/content/projects/ContentView.aspx?con_id=1507
 

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Try bringing the leaf to a local Rockler store (or other woodworking store). Call first and ask if they have a "finish expert" and what hours they work. If you go when they are working, they will be more than happy to look at the damage and recommend a treatment. In fact, they often will pull products from the shelf and help test them for you in an inconspicuous spot. Then you buy what you think works the best.
Dave
p.s. I don't work for Rockler :no:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Daveb- Excellent idea about taking the leaf to an expert. Unfortunately the damage is on the table, not the leaf.

Daren- I have some minwax finishing paste wax. It seems to blend pretty well in areas I've tested on the bottom of the leaf. One approach I've thought of is to buff the area with 0000 wool and then apply this wax. Would you recommend 400 grit sandpaper instead of steel wool? If the wax doesn't work well, I've thought of applying spot repair lacquer. What is the best way to remove wax if that doesn't achieve the right finish?
 

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I would attempt the lacquer thinner

in a spray bottle forst. A fine mist should elilminate the white and reform the film. Of course, if it was my table, I would remove the lacquer top coat all together and refinish with polyurethane. I find lacquer to be an unsuitable finish for dining tables. It softens with the heat of pots and platters. Even when they are on towels etc. Poly on the other hand does not.

Ed
 

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Daren- I have some minwax finishing paste wax. It seems to blend pretty well in areas I've tested on the bottom of the leaf. One approach I've thought of is to buff the area with 0000 wool and then apply this wax. Would you recommend 400 grit sandpaper instead of steel wool?
I was just saying sandpaper because if it did suit you on your test spot you could wrap it around a block of wood to smooth the high spots when you went to the top. I think steel wool would still leave a noticeable texture blemish (bump) even if you got the color/finish right. And you are working on a corner, you want something flat on both faces, the top and edge so not to round it over.

Joe makes a good point, simple but worth a try, Crayons. That is all those "furniture scratch repair sticks" are, colored wax. Buffed in I think it would work. You are not talking a huge spot like a bad water stain in varnish. You did a nice job sticking it back to together. It is in a spot that should not see wear, wax is going to be a fine finish and easily maintained. Just use regular furniture polish (Endust, Glade...whatever) you normally would.
 

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I would touch it up with some lacquer and a small artist brush. A good one. Then when dry you can use 0000 steel wool loaded with paste wax to smooth it out. Don't use the steel wool without it being loaded with paste wax or it will scratch. The rub in stick are a good idea first to fill in any slight missing wood. But don't rely on them filling much area. It is hard to tell from pictures. The best method is to have an experienced furniture repair person burn in the defects.
 

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Tuck,
Before I assume any finish on top of the table I would contact the manufacture. In most cases they will have a repair kit availible for you. This would be the best solution as it follows what the manufacture would like you to do before attempting anything that may cause further unrepairable problems. Just my .02. Good luck my friend.
 

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Tuck,
Before I assume any finish on top of the table I would contact the manufacture. In most cases they will have a repair kit availible for you. This would be the best solution as it follows what the manufacture would like you to do before attempting anything that may cause further unrepairable problems. Just my .02. Good luck my friend.
Well, I gotta say... that's a very good idea! :eek: :eek:

Sometimes that forest gets in the way of the trees... :laughing: :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
All- Excellent ideas! I will definitely call the manufacturer! They may have a recommended approach. Using a block or a straight edge to get the surface texture right is a fantastic idea!

I'm pretty sure the next step will involve prepping the surface with 400+ sandpaper, and then applying either a wax or a lacquer to finish. I'm still debating. I'll let you all know if I have any further questions. You've given me some great things to think about. Thanks!
 

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I would refinish the whole table...fixing spots has never been any good for me...do the whole thing...don't care if its new or old...do the whole job and do it right...oh, and use polyurethane, forget laquer on a dining room table with hot dishes...
 

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I aagree with GilaJorge. Especially the part about doing thew whole thing.

The finish is always debatable. It depends on use.

But "reamalgamation" is the hot issue here. Undoing what you have already done, and remedying the original faux pas is a topic for further discussion.

Are you ready?
 

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johnep
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In another thread I have reported on my table damaged with heat marks and the botched french polish we had appliedby a local 'expert'. I have now contacted a local family firm which sounds just like one of you guys and I will ask them to use polyurethane.

Once again this forum demonstrates the depth of knowledge of its members.
johnep
 
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