Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm new here and to finishing in general, so I thought I should get some advice before I screw up a project I have hours and hours into! Anyways, I'm working on a walnut enclosure for a chess board, and the top surface I've hand carved.

I want to be able to selectively tint parts of the carving to be darker (ie. the recessed areas), and there are some bits of sapwood on the sides that I would like to blend in with the surrounding wood.

Here is what I have in mind now on how to go about the finishing... I would love your feedback... I could be completely off-base, I dont know haha

1. Danish oil (watco medium/dark walnut) -> get the boards to the right general color and seal the wood. (also id use natural danish oil on the end grain)
2. Transtint dye+Shellac -> brush on the places I want, and if something goes wrong I can remove it with alcohol. (leaving the danish oil finish relatively untouched)
2. another coat or two of shellac?
3. Paste wax once I'm sure that everything looks alright

Would it be better to do the sapwood toning before danish oil so that the danish oil kinda locks the dye in there? One picture I attached shows the strips of sapwood that I thought would look nice, but I want to blend in now. I'm also contemplating doing a wash of honey amber transtint over everything before the danish oil to warm things up but I also worry about how evenly this could be applied to the carving.

I'll make sure to test what I can on scrap, but the carving makes this more difficult (something thats easy to apply to the flat scrap might be a nightmare on the carving, i dont know) Thanks in advance for your input!

(I've crossposted this over at homestead finishing)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,312 Posts
1. Danish oil is a finish and isn't normally used as a stain. You would be better off using a oil stain
instead. Danish oil probably need to dry for several weeks before it cured enough to proceed with a
protective coating over it.
2. Mixed transtint with shellac it would be difficult to shade spots of sapwood with a brush. You would
be better off just mixing it with alcohol.
3. Unless you get the means of spraying shellac I would choose another finish. The first coat wouldn't
be a problem. It's when you apply additional coats the alcohol in the shellac will melt the first coat
and you would be taking about as much off as you would be applying. It's just really difficult even for
the professional finisher to brush shellac. It you are wanting a protective coating to brush I would
recommend using an oil based polyurethane.

The proceedure I would recommend is to color the sapwood and leave the natural color of the walnut alone. Then apply a 50/50 coat of polyurethane and mineral spirits. When dry lightly sand with 220 grit sandpaper and apply a glazing liquid with burnt umber and maybe black tinting color to the carving areas and wipe the excess off. The glaze will highlight the carving and make it show up a lot more. Then when the glaze is dry continue finishing with the polyurethane not thinned. Probably two coats of satin poly would make the box look fine.

I can't remember the name of the product but Mohawk Finishing Products makes a dye formulated for walnut sapwood.
 

·
Log dog
Joined
·
7,935 Posts
Now that's sweet!!!!! Nice work, and the carving is the icing on the cake as they say.
I'd like to see some close up pics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
And where is the golden pedestal on which that work of art is going to rest upon? :laughing:

Awesome work!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks a bunch for the input and nice comments! Havent made a golden pedestal yet but I'll have to figure out something that's more fitting than my dorm bed haha.

Good point about brushing shellac being difficult. I'm kinda hesitant about a poly finish feeling too plastic-ey, but I'll have to give it a go on some scrap and see.

Time really isn't an issue so if I had to wait a few weeks before putting something on top of danish oil that would be fine. The can says to wait 72 hours before applying something like poly on top. I like the looks of oil finishes, and if I did use natural danish oil I wouldn't need a sealer before applying the glaze, right? Then after the glaze I think I would only need one coat of shellac or poly on top to prevent the glaze from wearing off.

I'm not dead-set on danish oil, but it seems like my options are either:
danish oil -> glazing -> shellac or poly
oil -> shellac or poly -> glazing -> shellac or poly
poly -> glazing -> poly

Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,312 Posts
Thanks a bunch for the input and nice comments! Havent made a golden pedestal yet but I'll have to figure out something that's more fitting than my dorm bed haha.

Good point about brushing shellac being difficult. I'm kinda hesitant about a poly finish feeling too plastic-ey, but I'll have to give it a go on some scrap and see.

Time really isn't an issue so if I had to wait a few weeks before putting something on top of danish oil that would be fine. The can says to wait 72 hours before applying something like poly on top. I like the looks of oil finishes, and if I did use natural danish oil I wouldn't need a sealer before applying the glaze, right? Then after the glaze I think I would only need one coat of shellac or poly on top to prevent the glaze from wearing off.

I'm not dead-set on danish oil, but it seems like my options are either:
danish oil -> glazing -> shellac or poly
oil -> shellac or poly -> glazing -> shellac or poly
poly -> glazing -> poly

Thanks again
I think you would save yourself a lot of grief getting into finishing if you would get the equipment to spray the finish. It makes just about any finish easier and better. You don't have to get the top of the line equipment to spray wood finishes either. I'm finishing professionally and I use a twenty dollar harbor freight sprayer and a project the size of that box you could use one of these little smudge pot compressors you can normally get for forty bucks. Since you show an interest in shellac, spraying it would be as easy as any other finish. Personally for projects like that I would prefer using lacquer. It is available in multiple sheens and very easy to work with. If you don't put it on very thick and use a satin lacquer you could achieve much the same look as the oil finish.

As far as the glaze, it would be better if the wood was sealed with something first. That way when you wipe off the excess the high points get wiped off clean. The idea of a glaze is to highlight the carving as time has aged antique carvings. When people clean these carvings the higher points of the carvings are continually wiped clean where the background gets embedded with oils, waxes and dirt darkening it. The glaze recreates that by having a binder hold a darker pigment and sticks to the background when you wipe it off. If the wood is not sealed first the glaze will work as a stain, staining the high points of the carving where it is desired for those parts to be wiped clean. The glaze will need to be topcoated with something as it would have a sheen that is completely dead flat. There shouldn't be enough glaze on the surface that rubbing it off is much of an issue but looks bad until topcoated.

One note about shellac is if you are using it with any other product it's best to use a de-waxed shellac such as zinsser sealcoat
.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top