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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My daughter has requested a wall mounted quilt rack made of walnut. She sent me a picture of the style she wants, just not distressed as in the picture. My question is the notch that is cut out to hold to rod looks like it might break. The quilt they will be using is 6' by 4', the rack will be 7' wide. My fear is that the quilt will have some 'heft' to it placing even more stress on the notch.

My thought is to do away with the notch and just bore a hole in the vertical bracket to place the rod in. Looking for some input.
 

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If the grain is running horizontal ( in reference to the pic), than it looks plenty stout enough to hold. If vertical it might break.
 

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I made 1 similar of Aromatic Cedar

I had the same concerns about the bottom breaking, so I simply drilled a 3/8" hole almost all the way thru from the backside and glued in an oak dowel. Good luck.
Jimmy
 

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I'd run it longer

By extending the piece, below the hook on the bottom, it would have more support on the wall. The dowel idea is good, a spline might be better. Run the piece into the blade having set the fence 3/8" on center. A stopped kerf about 2" high and 7" or 8" long on the backside won't show and will add a lot of strength regardless of grain direction. I use 1/8" plywood for these sort of things. Just make sure the grain on the spline is opposite the grain on the workpiece when gluing it up.

I would not trust the wood to hold up as shown in the photo.... :thumbdown:
 

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I think your idea would work best for me with a few modest changes. A dowel will sag under the weight of a heavy quilt, but a through mortise for a board like the one pictured would be very strong. Add a wedge and you have a classy look. One other minor change - I would make the top shelf wider and more useful. By making it wider, you can keep the design of the bracket. I have a nice scroll saw and would even add some simple scroll work to the bracket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I start vacation Wednesday and I'm headed on a 1 1/2 hour, one-way road trip for lumber. Found a guy selling walnut and maple for $2.25 a BF as well as oak for $2.00 a BF.
I like the idea of extending the bracket below the notch to allow for more wood and better support. As for dowels, I'm not sure I even know where to buy a 7' dowel. My thought was to glue 2 pieces of walnut together into approx. 1.5" square by 7' rod. Then router the corners to make it into a hexagonal type shape. I thought it might give more support.
As for scroll work, I have a 16" scroll saw that I haven't used. It was given to me by my father-in-law. This might be a good time to pull it out and give it a try....on scrap wood first!

Thanks for all the replies! Man I love this site!

~Bumpus
 

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I would definitely incorporate a spline like the others have said. You could use a wood with contrasting color for some interest.
 

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I start vacation Wednesday and I'm headed on a 1 1/2 hour, one-way road trip for lumber. Found a guy selling walnut and maple for $2.25 a BF as well as oak for $2.00 a BF.
I like the idea of extending the bracket below the notch to allow for more wood and better support. As for dowels, I'm not sure I even know where to buy a 7' dowel. My thought was to glue 2 pieces of walnut together into approx. 1.5" square by 7' rod. Then router the corners to make it into a hexagonal type shape. I thought it might give more support.
As for scroll work, I have a 16" scroll saw that I haven't used. It was given to me by my father-in-law. This might be a good time to pull it out and give it a try....on scrap wood first!

Thanks for all the replies! Man I love this site!



~Bumpus
7' dowel?? The dowel I mentioned goes into the bracket from the wall outboard, maybe 4" long. Worked real well on mine.
 

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My 5 piece quilt rack

No glue involved. Key hole slots on the back of the supports for hanging. Top simply lays on the brackets. Plate groove on the top. Reinforcing dowel through the bottom of the hanging brackets. It looks like it might be flimsy, but it's pretty strong.
Jimmy
Furniture Shelf Room Antique
 
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