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Discussion Starter #1
So for valentines day my wife has ask for a built in cabinet for our bathroom above the "throne." Apparently she is tired of the "HONEY BRING ME SOME MORE TP" I spew about once a week across the house.

Anyways this is my first attempt at anything that will not sit in the floor or weigh less than a few pounds. This cabinet is roughly going to be made out of 3/4 paint grade plywood, with two raised panel doors. Approx weight is roughly 65-80lbs, according to my home scales. Will then be trimmed out to look like it is a built in. Below is a pic of a very rough fit before I proceeded further.

The question I have is what is the best way and safest way to mount this to the wall. I just did the old knock and listen check and there appears to be a stud in each corner and one in the middle. The opening is 34.5" wide, so that would be about right if the studs are roughly 16" wide. So is the best way to mark where the studs are and just used 2.5" screws or so, and drill a few in each stud?? Or would it be safer to use a wall anchor of some sort. Or even run some 3/4 strips behind and screw to that?? I am really a novice at this, and have small kids in the house, and worry about the falling aspect of this.

Anybody got an opinion or experience in this? thanks!!
 

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Just screw to the studs. All the other ways you thought of also used the studs. They just used an intermediate step and were therefore provided less strength.

George
 

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Old School
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From your picture, if that's the height you are intending to install the cabinet, it looks too high to be accessible. I would use a studfinder or a big finish nail and find the center of the studs. Once you do that, measure over from one edge where they align on the back of the cabinet, and drill a pilot hole from the inside of the cabinet to line up with the center of the studs.

If you have at least a ½" back, that's is let in a rabbet and fastened, you could just go through that into the studs. If it's a ¼" back make and install some hang rails. Solid ¾" wood or plywood about 2½" high, running the width of the inside, to screw through to the studs. Screw them from the top/bottom (if using two), and at the ends of the cabinets (see picture below).

Depending on what your studs are, don't drive the screws fast. They could overspin and become ineffective (especially if metal studs).
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kit cab.jpg






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Rustic furniture
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The cabinet weight is a non issue when you hit the studs. Vertical weights on studs are incredibly high.
Drywall is another story. Don't mount just into the drywall.

It appears your cabinet back is 3/4" thick, from what you stated? If so, you can mount from nearly anywhere, but close to the top is advised. Also it appears you can drive a few screws into the side wall studs. I would do that just to keep the cabinet from sagging.
 

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Make sure you use a good grade of screw that intended for hanging cabinets. I get mine from a local lumber yard not Lowesscrews.
Tom
 

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So for valentines day my wife has ask for a built in cabinet for our bathroom above the "throne." Apparently she is tired of the "HONEY BRING ME SOME MORE TP" I spew about once a week across the house.

Anyways this is my first attempt at anything that will not sit in the floor or weigh less than a few pounds. This cabinet is roughly going to be made out of 3/4 paint grade plywood, with two raised panel doors. Approx weight is roughly 65-80lbs, according to my home scales. Will then be trimmed out to look like it is a built in. Below is a pic of a very rough fit before I proceeded further.

The question I have is what is the best way and safest way to mount this to the wall. I just did the old knock and listen check and there appears to be a stud in each corner and one in the middle. The opening is 34.5" wide, so that would be about right if the studs are roughly 16" wide. So is the best way to mark where the studs are and just used 2.5" screws or so, and drill a few in each stud?? Or would it be safer to use a wall anchor of some sort. Or even run some 3/4 strips behind and screw to that?? I am really a novice at this, and have small kids in the house, and worry about the falling aspect of this.

Anybody got an opinion or experience in this? thanks!!
i didn't read any other post's yet, but this is what i would do the stud's arn't going to come out so i would do this So is the best way to mark where the studs are and just used 2.5" screws or so, and drill a few in each stud?? yes do that
 

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Make sure you use a good grade of screw that intended for hanging cabinets. I get mine from a local lumber yard not Lowesscrews.
Tom
Good (great!) advice. Use cabinet hangers, and I would go 3". Subtract the 3/4" back and the 1/2" drywall and you still have about 1 3/4" into the stud. Whatever you choose to do, avoid using drywall screws.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks y'all, the screws into the stud is what I assumed, however I wanted to run it by someone with some experience.

Height question: not sure yet how high it will hang. What is standard for an upper cabinet height from the ground?

Also, the screws. I only have a lowes and HD in my area so will to on order online: certain brand work better than others? 2.5" ok?

And yes it is 3/4 ply on the back and sides so I plan on hitting all three studs twice in the back and two times on the sides. Is that sufficient?

Thanks again!!
 

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where's my table saw?
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my suggestions

Thanks y'all, the screws into the stud is what I assumed, however I wanted to run it by someone with some experience.

Height question: not sure yet how high it will hang. What is standard for an upper cabinet height from the ground?

(height depends on accessiblity for the shortest person AND not so low that you hit your head on it when getting up from the commode. no rules, just common sense.)

Also, the screws. I only have a lowes and HD in my area so will to on order online: certain brand work better than others? 2.5" ok?

(deck screws are much better than drywall screws, thicker and stronger...made for making decks!)

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Deck-Mat...lb-Pack-735068/202308669?N=5yc1vZbqmjZ1z0ztdg

And yes it is 3/4 ply on the back and sides so I plan on hitting all three studs twice in the back and two times on the sides. Is that sufficient?

(three across the top where the most pull out force is and 3 across the bottom would be very sufficient, making certain you hit the studs.)
:yes:

Thanks again!!
You can support it while attaching it with a temporary ledger board nailed into the studs and leveled out beforehand. That way the weight is resting on the ledger and you don't have to carry it. You can slide it side to side to get your holes properly aligned. You can measure inside the cabinet OR make a story board for the outside dimensions and the hole locations taken from the wall studs. The stud may NOT be exactly 16" on center. An exploratory finish nail hole up above the bottom of the cabinet won't show but it will give you a solid response. I've used a small drill 1/16" or so to find studs when I hang stuff. My cabinets are usually full of tools or other heavy things so I don't take any chances. :no:

A good discussion:
http://woodgears.ca/joint_strength/drywall_screws.html
 
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Old School
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Height question: not sure yet how high it will hang. What is standard for an upper cabinet height from the ground?
No real standard, like kitchen uppers. Over the toilet, it should be accessible, while accessing service to the tank should be available. If you install it too high, it may look out of scale. The height should be visually appealing. There may be some horizontal line elsewhere in the room to use for a judgement call.






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Rustic furniture
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Agree w/ Cab't.
Set it to a height that works for you and is visually appealing.
Kitchen cabinets are generally at 1ft from the ceiling (many times a soffit is in place).
But there is no standard to my knowledge.Even countertop heights in a bath are 3" lower (36" vs 33").
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks guys for the inputs, decided to go with 3" square head cabinet screws. I would say these were #8's. I put 4 screws up top hitting four studs, and 3 on the bottom up underneath. Seems to be plenty and extremely sturdy and to the wall! Thank you so much for the info! Here is a pic of the finished project. Wife is happy, which means I am happy.
 

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Chester's Gorilla
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Great thread. I have a question: How do you attach a back to a cabinet so that it can be load bearing? I was taught to just tack plywood into a rabbet in the back. This was a smaller cabinet, but what would you do for a larger cabinet? Do you glue it in? Use solid panel backing?

Thanks, -SW
 
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