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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I got a vintage 12" band saw at auction recently ($27, IYMK), which I have tentatively identified as a Backus (thank you OWWM.org picture archives) and that is pretty much all I know about it (though I did get plenty of hits on Mr. Magoo). The rust was/is pretty much superficial and the paint job seems pretty much intact, except for the safety housing.
As a general question about vintage machine restoration, how much does not matching the original color change the value? (like black or brown which I have on hand, not blaze orange or chrome plating everything). My current plan is to get it working to replace my current 9" Delta Shopmaster. Needs new tires and blade(s), but otherwise everything is balanced and spins great before clean up started. Of course, if a properly refurbished BS and my 9" one is worth enough for me to parley that into a 14+" BS, so be it :thumbsup:




Regards,
Steve
 

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Effect the value?!? Unless you are planning on doing a historical, museum quality restoration, I don't think the color matters as long as it's done tastefully (that is, no hideous color combos that will make people run away from it when they see it).

Cheers,
Brad
 

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If you have a powder coating service nearby, I highly recommend you let them sand (media) blast and powder coat any previously painted part that needs being redone. They should be able to match previous color closely, and you'll end up with a baked on finish that should outlive you.
 

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We paint an awful lot of re-habbed,reconstructed,modified,welded,etc etc.....equip here.Our std. finish is SW Industrial enamel,Naptha reducer,and a taste of TS hardener.Primer is an extremely involved subject.Suffice it to say,a LOT of factory,cast machines never had any primer shot on them.Enamel was applied directly to machine,YMMV.

Colour is usually just a match of factory,look inside or under the pce(which is where our services take us any-ole-way,haha).
 

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The folks over at OWWM don't really care about returning the equipment to the original color and I don't think the color really affects the value. If the paint is in good condition regardless of the color I think it helps the value. Personally when I repaint a machine I like to put it as close to the original color as I can if I can.
 

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I agree with the guys above that as long as the paint color is tastefully chosen you're okay. If you do decide to match the original colors, close is good enough. Many tool manufacturers in the past were not real fussy about one batch of their paint being exactly like the last. For example, a lot people have noted that the Delta/Rockwell tools came in many shades of similar gray through the years.

Plus, that paint you are looking at on your band saw has aged for a long time and might not be the same shade it was when it was put on - even in the areas (like under badges) where light and wear haven't affected it. And remember, you are restoring a band saw, not a '32 Packard Roadster. The paint shade isn't all that critical. You don't have to worry about white-gloved judges at a concours car show evaluating your paint.

Personally, I think powder coating is an unnecessary expense. A good coat of primer and a carefully applied Rustoleum rattle-can paint job (or other quality paint) will last for many year indoors. Like BW said, most of these old machines never saw a coat of primer to start with.

A lot of guys swear by brush painting old 'arn, but you have to use a quality paint and a good brush to get smooth results.

Congrats on your new saw, BTW!

Bill
 
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