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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I started out with a small 4x4 of cedar and turned it round and then tried my hand at a cove and a bead and then it started to look like a vase so... It is a vase as soon as I drill the inside out. I had a hard time getting the part off tool to part it off... so I took it to the table saw and dang the luck I had some bad tear out. it has two coats of lacquer on it. sanding and finishing is awesome on a lathe!.

P.S. have no fear I am not leaving the tools outside, that is just where I had the lathe. My shop is to small to have a place to turn in it so I move it in and out as needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
by the way feel free to critique it I know it isn't perfect it still has tool marks even though I went up to 300 grit when sanding. But I'm proud of it my tools and the lathe non the less:smile:
 

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by the way feel free to critique it I know it isn't perfect it still has tool marks even though I went up to 300 grit when sanding. But I'm proud of it my tools and the lathe non the less:smile:
Looks good man!! The parting tool is easy once you realize the angle it needs to be. If you go straight in it is very slow and wants to catch, if you angle it up a little and quite a bit above center it will cut like butter.

You will get most of your tool marks out with 100 or 150 grit and then remove the grit marks with the next finest grit. Power sanding works great if you get a lot of tool marks or tear out.

I really enjoy building "usefull" things but turning is pretty artistic and can be done without a lot of artistic talent. I think that is what is cool to me.

Have fun and keep posting pics :yes:
 

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Looks good man!! The parting tool is easy once you realize the angle it needs to be. If you go straight in it is very slow and wants to catch, if you angle it up a little and quite a bit above center it will cut like butter.

You will get most of your tool marks out with 100 or 150 grit and then remove the grit marks with the next finest grit. Power sanding works great if you get a lot of tool marks or tear out.

I really enjoy building "usefull" things but turning is pretty artistic and can be done without a lot of artistic talent. I think that is what is cool to me.

Have fun and keep posting pics :yes:
Yeah man it really was very fun now that I have the proper tools. That is how I was using the part off tool(straight in) and it kept catching. I learned several things but 2 of them will stick in my head for awhile. Number 1 this isn't as easy as it looks, and number 2 when the roughing gouge catches and you don't have your hand in the right place and it gets sucked up against the tool rest it really frakin hurts lol
 

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Tommie, looking good for a first turning. Happy to see some pictures from you. :thumbsup:

I have a 1/16in wide parting tool and a 1/4in diamond parting tool.

The 1/16in is a deep blade. This one is used straight, but it will overheat if I go deep. I have ended up using this to mark the parting line, then finish with a hard back hand saw while still on the lathe, but with the lathe off.

I use the 1/4in diamond parting tool rubbing the bevel, so angled up as mentioned in another reply.

FYI, drilling out the vase takes some care and attention. A Forstner bit is the way to go for large diameters (> 1/2in dia), but they are not long and do not try taking everything in one go.

In a recent thread I was asking about hollowing a vase. In my case 1 13/16in x 7 3/8in deep to match a glass insert.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/how-do-you-hollow-deep-narrow-forms-51100/

I mounted the wood on the lathe. I have a scroll chuck. You do not have this option yet. You will need to securely clamp the piece on the drill press. I did not do so the first time I tried drilling the hole for Dominick's mallet swap and the bit grabbed and threw the piece to one side. Happy to say no damage or injuries, but lesson learned. Now if I attempt drilling on the drill press I clamp as good as possible. Not so easy with the round shape.

I drilled first with a 3/4in Forstner, then a 1 1/2in and finally a 1 13/16in.

I am now working on the next vase and yesterday I found I was able to drill in two passes, 1in dia followed by 1 3/4in dia.

Slow drill speed. I use about 500 rpm. Slow feed rate, back out frequently to clear the chips and dust so air can attempt to keep the bit cool.

I sharpened the bit before drilling this time. Helped to make things easier to cut.

To get any depth you will likely need an extension for the Forstner bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys. John I will watch this when I get home from work. And Dave thanks for the tips. :thumbsup:
 

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looks quite nice for a first turning
practice and practice and more practice will make you better
watching hours of videos is worth more than you can imagine too
 

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robert421960 said:
looks quite nice for a first turning
practice and practice and more practice will make you better
watching hours of videos is worth more than you can imagine too
Yep, I've watched a lot of videos. Carl Jacobson has some good videos.
 

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Very nice. I haven't turned that much cedar but what I have turned I really liked the way it turned. I have yet to try a hollow vessel. Let us know how it turns out. Great first turning.
Tom
 

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Try a finish that blocks UV to try and keep that cool color of the cedar. Doesn't take to long before it turns more brown.
 

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Try a finish that blocks UV to try and keep that cool color of the cedar. Doesn't take to long before it turns more brown.
Yeah I know it sucks when it loses the color but the home depot and walmart doesn't sell that stuff here and the nearest woodcrarft is about three hours away maybe I could order it online
 

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Yeah I know it sucks when it loses the color but the home depot and walmart doesn't sell that stuff here and the nearest woodcrarft is about three hours away maybe I could order it online
im in the same boat as you
but is there not any local small hardware stores that might have it
 

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Yeah I know it sucks when it loses the color but the home depot and walmart doesn't sell that stuff here and the nearest woodcrarft is about three hours away maybe I could order it online
Tommie, even if you get a finish with UV blocking, it will still turn the brown colour. It may take a short while longer, but not much.

I have a cedar board in my garage shop which only has a window in the side entryway door. No windows in the two garage doors. Even in this environment it does keep the rich pink colour very long.

Same for some redwood boards I have. Nice red colour when cut, but dulls over time even without much light.

I have a padauk board which is a dull red, but not as dark as it will eventually turn. If I cut or sand this I will have the bright orange/red colour, but a few days later it will be darkening.

For comparison, I have some cherry boards which are not yet darkening.

The natural oxidation process's can be difficult to control.

I would just accept the colour change.
 

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That is awesome Tommie.

Not sure what grit you started with. If I want a good finish I sand on slow speed then stop the lathe and sand with the grain by hand. I repeat the process with each grit

I often use 100 150 320 400 600

Do you think you are addicted?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
That is awesome Tommie.

Not sure what grit you started with. If I want a good finish I sand on slow speed then stop the lathe and sand with the grain by hand. I repeat the process with each grit

I often use 100 150 320 400 600

Do you think you are addicted?
not quite yet but it is definetly fun and I also found out that I was using to high of a grit I am used to working with flatstock in the rough with no planer so I started with 80 grit yeah I know ... and the bead on that was fairly round till I started sanding
 

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Turning Wood Into Art
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not quite yet but it is definetly fun and I also found out that I was using to high of a grit I am used to working with flatstock in the rough with no planer so I started with 80 grit yeah I know ... and the bead on that was fairly round till I started sanding
You'll have to get a wealthy sponsor to send you over here for some lessons, not that I'm a skilled turner but we'll have a great time anyway.
 

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I'm sorry Tommie. You've been sucked in. It's like a black hole. There's no way out. Do yourself a favor and sell all of your other tools; you don't need them anymore. Use the money to buy a bigger lathe, or more chisels, or that chuck you've got your eye on...
 
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