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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I just joined this forum and have a question regarding wood veneer applications.

I will be building a 14' x 6' conference table for a client and I'm having a very difficult time deciding which method to use for applying the birch veneer. The top itself will be 1.5" thick (3/4" AC w/ 3/4" MDF on top) and I have found 4x8 sheets of veneer so there will be 2 seams, 1 running the center of the length and 1 running the center of width. The top when finished, however, will be 1 piece.

I can't seem to decide whether to use glue or contact cement. My biggest fear is bubbles and the potential for the seams to open at some point, whether it be 2 weeks from now or 2 years.
Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Rob
 

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My personal choice

would be contact cement.................carefully applied.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've heard many horror stories of the veneer separating at the seams or bubbling when contact cement was used. I was initially planning to use CC until I heard of the problems. Granted, I'm sure a high % is due to improper techniques, though.
Thanks again!
 

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Old School
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It's imperative to have very smooth coats of cement on both the veneer and the substrate. For the solvent based contact cement, there are special "adhesive" roller covers for standard paint rollers that don't separate due to the solvent. Better yet, the cement can be sprayed from a standard syphon cup spray gun. Before laminating, check both the veneer and substrate for any foreign particles.

There's are a few methods for getting good joints. If you have perfectly straight edges, the faces can be taped together before adhering. A good practice for laying the cemented sheets is to start with laying down dowel rods, at least 1/2" in diameter, close enough together to keep the veneer off of the substrate. When ready to apply, start in the middle making sure any joints are together, press down, and begin moving out the dowel rods slowly and pressing down in an outward fan motion to eliminate any air. After it is all in contact, use a roller, or a block of wood with eased edges to press down the veneer.
 

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johnep
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Somewhere there is a vid on utube showing the construction of a pool table from MDF which is then veneered.
johnep
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, I just spoke with my supplier and he strongly suggested that use contact cement also. He also said that since I'm using MDF as the substrate it would eliminate the chances of seams opening. Thanks for your help fellas!
 
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