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Is it possible to remove veneer for existing furniture I ask because someone asked me and I did not have an answer for him. If it is possible how do you go about it this is just a question guys.

Bruce.
 

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It's generally pretty easy. I have a walnut table top in the shop now that I'm patching. Usually all you need is a heat gun to soften the glue.
 

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Hey PK

I have a very old file cabinet, made out of oak with a veneer oak top, and I need to replace the top surface. Will a heat gun work on older glues as well? I am guessing this cabinet was probably built in the 1920's.

Thanks

Gerry
 

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I generally find the best way of removing veneer's, is to ask an apprentice to lightly sand it ;)

Most glues are softened by heat so that would be the best advised place to start, along with the most important tool "patience"

Alternatively, does the veneer need removing? If it is holed you don't have much choice but, if the only faults with it are scratches, it's surprising how careful work with a cabinet scraper can rejuvenate the surface ready to be repolished

:icon_smile: :smile: :icon_smile:
 

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I generally find the best way of removing veneer's, is to ask an apprentice to lightly sand it ;)

Most glues are softened by heat so that would be the best advised place to start, along with the most important tool "patience"

Alternatively, does the veneer need removing? If it is holed you don't have much choice but, if the only faults with it are scratches, it's surprising how careful work with a cabinet scraper can rejuvenate the surface ready to be repolished

:icon_smile: :smile: :icon_smile:

Welcome Aboard !
 

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Hi All

In my case the oak file cabinet was subjected to a gret deal of water before I received it. the top veneer has lifted very severely. The underlaying plies are also lifted, and curled, so I think the only way to restore this cabinet is to completely remove the upper layers, and start again. I will try to salvage as much of the old veneer as I can, because it has the patina of the age. That said, I am not sure if will be able to save it. Most of the rest of the cabinet is solid wood, and although it is stained, etc, I feel I can bring it back. This is a six drawer file cabinet that is in three units that stack on top of each other, plus a top which stacks on them. I think it is worth restoring, and feel it would be a beautiful piece of furniture once done. My wife thinks it should be burned.
Best regards

Gerry
 

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The aforementioned table is a $60 antique store find that's receiving about $400 worth of work to. The customer's husband wanted to burn it too.

Heat should peel it off. If the substrate is in real bad shape, I'd probably just replace the whole top.
 

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Hi All

In my case the oak file cabinet was subjected to a gret deal of water before I received it. the top veneer has lifted very severely. The underlaying plies are also lifted, and curled, so I think the only way to restore this cabinet is to completely remove the upper layers, and start again. I will try to salvage as much of the old veneer as I can, because it has the patina of the age. That said, I am not sure if will be able to save it. Most of the rest of the cabinet is solid wood, and although it is stained, etc, I feel I can bring it back. This is a six drawer file cabinet that is in three units that stack on top of each other, plus a top which stacks on them. I think it is worth restoring, and feel it would be a beautiful piece of furniture once done. My wife thinks it should be burned.
Best regards

Gerry
Personally if the underlying plies are blown (lifted), I'd look at replacing the whole top. Once re-veneered and polished/ waxed, any blemish's under the new veneer would probably show through and detract from a quality peice of furniture, replacing the entire top could work out easier to do in the long run


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Hi All

I think I will likely replace the top with a piece of 3/4 inch oak veneered plywood, and salvage as much of the existing veneer as I can for repairs elsewhere on the cabinet. The big trick then will be colour matching the plywood with the cabinet. It was stained to a very dark, almost walnut shade, and of course the wood has also picked up some character with the years. I wood like to be able to refinish to look almost new, and still look it's real age, if you follow me.

Gerry
 
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