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I'm doing my first veneer glue up. I bought a little pack of babinga at Woodcraft. The edges looked good enough to but against each other, so I glued them up. Now I have some gaps. I don't know if it's easy to fix or not. From what I've seen you want to do both sides so it doesn't warp. So this can be the practice side. The other way I can think to do it is, before they are glued lay the joints over each other overlapping a tiny bit, then cut through both. Will that work. Or is there a better way. It's to thin for a jointer. I used particle board because I had it laying around. Is that Ok, or should I have used something else. Thanks
Chris

 

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When I first started I would press 3 sheets onto 3 seperate pieces of particle board.Run them through the table saw and jointer and buscuit them together:yes: Now I use a straight edge and a sharp knife.Overlapping them and cutting through both is best,but it hasn't worked good for me.Try it you might have better luck,other people do it just fine.You could also sandwich the veneer between part. board and run it through the jointer or use a flushtrim bit and a router.Just watch for tearout!
Using particle board is fine as long as were talking about the smooth stuff not the chipboard stuff.I'm not sure on their exact definitions.
 

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It's the smooth stuff. I could run it through the table saw at the joints then glue it back together. I'll see if anyone else has a better idea If not that's what I'll do. Thanks.
Chris
 

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It's the smooth stuff. I could run it through the table saw at the joints then glue it back together. I'll see if anyone else has a better idea If not that's what I'll do. Thanks.
Chris

You didn't say what the panel would be for. If you're not too concerned about the pattern, you could overlay a piece on each joint, and knife cut through both outer edges. Having marked them for position, take away the loose piece, and remove the two damaged pieces each one replaces. Then glue in the two new pieces. So, you'll wind up with 5 sections. You can plan the cuts so all 5 sections are equal.



 

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Mostly Spalted
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Using particle board is fine as long as were talking about the smooth stuff not the chipboard stuff.I'm not sure on their exact definitions.


One thing to keep an eye on when using PB or MDF is the glue you use.
A water based glue will make the material swell and separate your seam.
If you use water base glue you should seal the PB first, then give it a light scuff with fine grit sand paper before applying your veneer.

Also if you're not already doing it, be sure to fit your pieces and tape them together so the seam stays tight before gluing.
Unless you have veneer tape you should tape the face side. Be very carefull when doing this as some tape is really hard to remove if left on too long.
I use blue or green tape on my stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
One thing to keep an eye on when using PB or MDF is the glue you use.
A water based glue will make the material swell and separate your seam.
If you use water base glue you should seal the PB first, then give it a light scuff with fine grit sand paper before applying your veneer.

Also if you're not already doing it, be sure to fit your pieces and tape them together so the seam stays tight before gluing.
Unless you have veneer tape you should tape the face side. Be very carefull when doing this as some tape is really hard to remove if left on too long.
I use blue or green tape on my stuff.
I forgot about using the tape (blue). I'm using contact cement. All of the guys I've talked to around here do it that way. Without a vacuum press, that seems to be the best way. What do you think?
 

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Andrew Close
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Chris, i remember reading something about doing just what you're looking to do in a magazine article a couple days ago. if i remember :smile: i'll try to find that article and give you the details.
the gist of it was laying out your pieces so you were happy with how the grains lined up and then cutting them with a straight edge. you had to overlap the pieces a bit. but i don't remember how he knew that his grains were lined up, so i'll have to find the article...
 

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I also use contact cement, but know several people that swear by water based glues.
 

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I keep forgetting to ask if you guys use the flattener for the veneer. I did the first side without using it. I think I do have a bump or 2. I haven't messed with it since because I wasn't sure if I should get the flattener, then it takes a few days to dry out I guess? Is it worth the trouble to do the flattener?
Chris
 

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I keep forgetting to ask if you guys use the flattener for the veneer. I did the first side without using it. I think I do have a bump or 2. I haven't messed with it since because I wasn't sure if I should get the flattener, then it takes a few days to dry out I guess? Is it worth the trouble to do the flattener?
Chris

For curly, wavy, or just plain bumpy veneers such as burls and crotches, a veneer softener works good. Directions may vary according to brand.






 

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Andrew Close
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Chris, i remember reading something about doing just what you're looking to do in a magazine article a couple days ago. if i remember :smile: i'll try to find that article and give you the details.
the gist of it was laying out your pieces so you were happy with how the grains lined up and then cutting them with a straight edge. you had to overlap the pieces a bit. but i don't remember how he knew that his grains were lined up, so i'll have to find the article...
ok, so i'm not sure i remembered the article correctly, or if i can't find the article i'm thinking of. regardless, here's what i found:

American Woodworker - March 2008
page 13 in the 'Question & Answer' section

Q: I've got three unusual boards to glue together, but I'm having a hard time visualizing all the combinations of which board should go next to which. Any tips?

A: Here's one idea: make "virtual" tops. Take photos of the boards, cut up the pictures and tape them together in different arrangements. Make copies of the arrangements you like, so you can directly compare one with another. Let's assume that you've got three boards and both side of each board are good enough to face up in your top. Pick one side of each board and mark it as A1, B1, C1. Lay the boards together, in any order, and take a photo. Turn the boards over, mark the opposite faces as A2, B2, C2, and take another photo. Print several copies of both photos and you've got your virtual boards. Cut up the photos and arrange the pieces as you wish. You can even 'rip' a board with a pair of scissors to see how the figure in one board may best blend with the figure in another.

now i don't know why i was thinking you were having a hard time figuring out how to arrange your veneer. :no: you were trying to come up with ways to joint the edges for gluing.
well, maybe this little snippet will help somebody else out. :wallbash: :wallbash: :laughing:
 

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ok, so i'm not sure i remembered the article correctly, or if i can't find the article i'm thinking of. regardless, here's what i found:

American Woodworker - March 2008
page 13 in the 'Question & Answer' section

Q: I've got three unusual boards to glue together, but I'm having a hard time visualizing all the combinations of which board should go next to which. Any tips?

A: Here's one idea: make "virtual" tops. Take photos of the boards, cut up the pictures and tape them together in different arrangements. Make copies of the arrangements you like, so you can directly compare one with another. Let's assume that you've got three boards and both side of each board are good enough to face up in your top. Pick one side of each board and mark it as A1, B1, C1. Lay the boards together, in any order, and take a photo. Turn the boards over, mark the opposite faces as A2, B2, C2, and take another photo. Print several copies of both photos and you've got your virtual boards. Cut up the photos and arrange the pieces as you wish. You can even 'rip' a board with a pair of scissors to see how the figure in one board may best blend with the figure in another.

now i don't know why i was thinking you were having a hard time figuring out how to arrange your veneer. :no: you were trying to come up with ways to joint the edges for gluing.
well, maybe this little snippet will help somebody else out. :wallbash: :wallbash: :laughing:
I just saw an article like that. You make me feel better. I do stuff like that.
 
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