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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am making my first stool, it's not the greatest but I would like to get it as good as I can. I want to cover up the screws on the footbar thingies with twine and then poly them along with everything else. I was just wondering if I should wet the twine first and if so should I just moisten it or saturate it. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Several sources I went to said jute twine doesn't shrink for the most part. One source said really hot water, but I got the feeling he was talking about a diff material. Leather would shrink up nice, but I don't have any, I think cotton based material too. Hoping this might help, but I don't know anything for sure. I don't really need to have my twine tight as I am going to poly over it....if I keep it on....not really happy with the look lol.
 

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There are several ways to cover up screws and we do it on dive boats all the time. 1/8" poly rope is our favorite. Start off with a clove hitch and wind it tight and close. Finish off with a clove hitch and seal everything with poly. You can find really thin stuff and X it over screw in an ever increasing weave. Since you are already using steel, you might consider putting a staple in the back of the leg to begin it.
 

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I'm no expert on twine but was a Scoutmaster for many years and used twine for lashings. The twine I'm familiar with had an oil coating so it wouldn't rot. This could prevent a problem when coating the project. Just a heads up...
 

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I put twine wraps on like this:

1) make a loop in the end of the cord about 3-4 times the length of the wrapping you want.

2) lay the loop along the area you want to wrap, with the head of the loop an inch or so beyond where you want the wrap to end.

3) Take the running end and start wrapping around the loop toward the head of the loop. Pull it tight as you go.

4) When you have wrapped as far as you want to go, you should have the free end of the loop sticking out of the wrap, and two or three inches or so of the free end the original loop sticking out the other end.

5) cut the end you just finished wrapping with just under twice the length of the wrapping itself, and put the cut end through the loop.

6) finish by pulling the free end at the start of the wrapping until the loop pulls the other end down under the wrapping just out of sight. Then cut the end you just pulled even with the wrap, and tuck the end sideways under the wrapping.

Done right, neither end of the cord is visible, and the wrapping is neat and tight. Easier to do than describe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
awesome ideas, gonna have to try everything that comes by me. I'm sure I'm messing stuff up, haha. Got 3 projects underway and was gonna post pics, but they are too big and I'm not sure how to shrink the file size yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
will have to try that next time, my wrapping looks haphazard but I think it kinda fit the stool. I wanted something that looked very basic and maybe a little Gilligan's Islandy.
 

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Hafting a Haida-style Blade

This is the process that I use for wrapping guides on a custom fishing rod. Same as for these knives but it's mostly cosmetic to hide the screws and epoxy.
The blades are canted about 10 degrees in the handles (glue-ups of rosewood & mahogany). Cut a slot for the blade shank and mount with JBWeld epoxy and two #7 Robertson head screws.
1. Make a cord loop 6-8" long with lots of big knots to hang onto.
2. Coping saw or carving tools, make a little groove where the first wrap is supposed to sit (not on the rods!).
3. Make a little hole (1/16" x 1/8" deep) in the handle, about 5-6 wraps up the wood.
4. From the cord spool, run the cord through a big book. Add weight on the closed book as needed = keeps uniform tension on the cord.
5. Stuff the free end of the cord in the little hole and wrap diagonally down to the groove where the wrap is supposed to start.
On a rod, I use a scrap of masking tape that I later pull off.
6. OK, Go to it. Tension. Push the wraps together with your thumbnail. Keep going until you're about 5 wraps from where you want to finish.
7. Lay the loopy cord on the wood, knotty end towards where you started, the loop sticking 1" out beyond wherte you want to finish.
8. Wrap over top of the loop until you're done.
9. Hold the cord, cut and put the fresh cut end through the loop.
10. Keeping it tight, pull on the cord loop to pull the cut end under some wraps.
11. I slop it up with carpenter's glue which soaks in just fine.

The picture: Mora #171 Equus hook knife blades are mounted with pairs of brass cutlery rivets, those are the 2 pairs on the right.
On the left are 4 Haida-style crooked carving knives. I did different patterns of yellow (nylon) and brown (dacron).
For scale, the planer knife was a Mora #188 hook knife, now set into a dog-leg 18" handle. I used brown at the hand positions as the wood was looking really dirty/grimy!

Well, if you got this far, I hope there are some ideas for your chair wraps.
 

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Alchymist has described the Boy Scout method of "whipping" the ends of a rope. Some of the older BSA handbooks illustrated the method but that is what it's called
 

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I can do a traditional "whip finish" on ropes or fishing flies.
I could have used the traditional "single-strand ring-bolt hitch" instead.
My choice was the standard rod guide wrap.
Why? It's mostly cosmetic to hide the blade shanks, epoxy and screw heads.

Don't forget that I'm spinning a double-bevelled, crooked steel carving knife with edges better than you find on single-edged razor blades. I'm wearing leather gloves. I have a very healthy paranoia about slashing my wrist with these things.

You hold these knives in a fist grip, swinging the bevels towards you with a flicking wrist action.
I'm ambidexterous so I can work with a knife in each hand at the same time. Every once in a while, the blade catches in the carving wood and I pull harder and a bigger chip comes off. The overtravel from the knife action results in getting hit in the chest. Not funny. 2X thick denim apron.
 

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I put twine wraps on like this:

1) make a loop in the end of the cord about 3-4 times the length of the wrapping you want.

2) lay the loop along the area you want to wrap, with the head of the loop an inch or so beyond where you want the wrap to end.

3) Take the running end and start wrapping around the loop toward the head of the loop. Pull it tight as you go.

4) When you have wrapped as far as you want to go, you should have the free end of the loop sticking out of the wrap, and two or three inches or so of the free end the original loop sticking out the other end.

5) cut the end you just finished wrapping with just under twice the length of the wrapping itself, and put the cut end through the loop.

6) finish by pulling the free end at the start of the wrapping until the loop pulls the other end down under the wrapping just out of sight. Then cut the end you just pulled even with the wrap, and tuck the end sideways under the wrapping.

Done right, neither end of the cord is visible, and the wrapping is neat and tight. Easier to do than describe.
I think a YouTube video is in order sir. I can't quite picture this.

Nvm. Thanks Bernie for the name. There are several videos already. :)
 

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Alchymist's wrap is the same as mine
a) I back-wrap the start so there's no loose end to tidy up.
b) I only pull through about 5 wraps at the end so there's less of a lump.

What you might look for is a Youtube of guide wrapping for fishing rods.

The trad. whip finish leaves a long spiral of half-hitch knots that I don't like. It's OK as black thread on the head of a fly but not for big items with big cord.
I like the look of the single-strand ring-bolt hitch best of all but it is tedious to do any length.

Hindsight shows me that I can afford to be quite generous with the glue.
 

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Nope, not at all. All you need is a knife or scissors. Make the little pulling loop and keep it handy. If it's your desire to wrap the whole cross bar, from one leg to another, back wrap maybe 5 turns and go to the other end. You get to skip the starting groove with the starting chair leg as the stop.
Wrap HARD. Push the turns together tightly.
Having made the little loop, wrap the last 5 turns over top of it. Cut off your running end of cord, stick it through the loop and pull to tuck it back underneath and out of sight.
 
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