Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am making a bunch of napkin holders for gifts. My plan is to route a 1/2" dado in the sides and fit the cross piece to the dados. I attached two feather boards - one to hold the pieces to the table and one to hold the pieces to the fence. The boards were tight enough to create resistance to moving the piece over the router, but not tight enough to to cause me to break out in a sweat moving the pieces. :wink: Almost forgot - I was using an upcut bit. The fuzz comes off easily with a sharp chisel.

I successfully routed the sides for two napkin holders, but on the third set, both sides moved enough to ruin them. Below are photos of a finished holder and of a bad dado. Did I give enough info? I thought about using the table saw to cut the dados, but thought this would be more consistent and easier...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
As has already been asked, it appears you were attempting to take to much material in one pass. I'd use your table saw to rough out most of the material and use the router for a clean up finish pass. Or use a smaller bit in the router, multiple passes, to remove the bulk of the material and then a finish pass with the 1/2 inch bit.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
27,880 Posts
Use multiple passes!

First of all, unless you use a router bit that is smaller in diameter than the finished dado, you will have to have very precise control.....

The best way is to use a small bit and make two passes to get the width and several passes to get the depth. This was always an issue for me making dado with a router, so I prefer using a dado set in the table saw. Basically, one pass will do it. Once you get the width dialed in, a depth of 1/4" is fine, but a bit deeper is OK also.
However, any of these router guides will work if that's the way you want to proceed:
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=router+dado+guide


I like this one:
 
  • Like
Reactions: RonBenson

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Gentlemen. I thought that since I was only going 1/4" deep, 1 pass with the 1/2" bit would be OK. Is there a guide somewhere that tells how deep each pass should be with a given bit size?
My plunge base has steps that appear to be about 1//4", so that's why I thought I would be OK...

Almost forgot - the bit is almost new - only used a few times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,599 Posts
I do not think that 1/4" deep with 1/2" bit is too much in 1 pass is too deep in most cases. Obviously it is in this case it is too much. I still suspect bit problems.


Of course you could also be trying to force it through too fast.



George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
Thanks Gentlemen. I thought that since I was only going 1/4" deep, 1 pass with the 1/2" bit would be OK. Is there a guide somewhere that tells how deep each pass should be with a given bit size?
My plunge base has steps that appear to be about 1//4", so that's why I thought I would be OK...

Almost forgot - the bit is almost new - only used a few times.
Every material will have a different value at the maximum depth. Results will vary based on bit RPM's, rate of feed, etc.

The best results are by using a bit smaller than the desired width and cutting each side independently, such that both sides are cut in the same direction relative to the spinning bit. If you make a cut with an on-size rotating bit, one edge will be "climb cut" and the other edge will be "up cut".

Best practice would be to make a roughing cut(s) down the center (with undersize bit) then move over to clean up the edges and take the slot to the desired width.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,352 Posts
There are great comments and recommendations above, and I agree with them.

How deep is the router bit in the collet? When you mount the router bit, do you bottom it out, then raise it 1/16 inch or more off the bottom? Could it be mounted too shallow in the collet?

How are chips and sawdust being cleared out as you make the pass? Do you have some kind of dust collection running? Could there be a thick buildup of debris that is deflecting the router bit? I have encountered problems where the buildup can block or interfere with smooth movement, and pushing it harder is not the answer.

What does it feel like when you make the pass? Is it smooth and consistent through the dado cut from end to end? Did you feel unusual vibration or shaking in that ugly middle part when you were making the pass? Does it feel right to you?
 

·
Registered
Egg Spurt
Joined
·
1,882 Posts
A good quality dado stack in the TS would very likely solve the problem. I'm not big on power routers, but that's me. I do use them for occasional work, but it's occasional. Personally I kind of like my router plane more than a power router, but there are certain profiles I just can't afford using planes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: B Coll

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,204 Posts
I stopped using dados for this kind of work. Waste of time ...But that's must be why I have 20+ routers....
 

·
Registered
Egg Spurt
Joined
·
1,882 Posts
I stopped using dados for this kind of work. Waste of time ...But that's must be why I have 20+ routers....
I collect (or used to anyway) oil lamps on the off chance the electric went out and the electric company did indeed shut off my power for awhile and they came in darn handy. I thought about electric routers in case the power went out, but a little part of me decided that's not a great idea.. :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
How is your router mounted in your table? You mentioned a plunge base. Is this the base you used for mounting? If so, that might contribute to the problem. If not, then a couple of shallower passes might suffice.

Good looking project, by the way.

So far as the fuzz goes, an emery board like used on fingernails makes short work of it. It’s quick and easy.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,411 Posts
It also looks like part of the issue is that you're technically "cross cutting" that dado. That workpiece is longer than it is wide. Keeping a long narrow piece stable as you cut in the shorter direction is always harder than when you're cutting in the longer direction. It's harder to keep that steady, especially if you're using a bit the size of the finished dado, since the fence side of the bit is climb cutting, trying to pull the workpiece out of your hands.

From your description, you said there was a featherboard pushing it against the fence. How are you pushing the piece across the bit? By hand, or with a miter gauge?

I would do that with a miter gauge and dado blade if you have it, with a bump stop, rather than the fence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
I don't think this is the issue. Unless I'm wrong...

cutting 1/2 wide with a 1/2 bit, one side is up-cutting, the other side is climb cutting.
as Yoda said, there is no try - those are the facts and the botched up cut shows the results.


either cross cut kerf on one or both sides, or use a smaller diameter bit - allowing you to do an up cut on both sides.
one is advised to use a miter gauge to maintain straight and the fence to maintain distance.


the other options are simple: more wood.
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top