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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I’m looking to attach one of those wireless charger pads for charging my phone onto the other end of a table top, so I would need to bore a circle underneath the table top and place the charging pad there.

I know that hole saws are used to make holes, but I’m looking to use it to make just an indentation as I do not want to make an actual hole. I know that a router is probably better but I do not have that tool.

I’m wondering if anyone can guide me on how to do this properly. Here is a YouTube video of someone doing this, but I’ve never worked with hole saws before and a video doesn’t tell a whole lot….

Need advice from the experts please!
 

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Smart and Cool
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Hi Everyone,

I’m looking to attach one of those wireless charger pads for charging my phone onto the other end of a table top, so I would need to bore a circle underneath the table top and place the charging pad there.

I know that hole saws are used to make holes, but I’m looking to use it to make just an indentation as I do not want to make an actual hole. I know that a router is probably better but I do not have that tool.

I’m wondering if anyone can guide me on how to do this properly. Here is a YouTube video of someone doing this, but I’ve never worked with hole saws before and a video doesn’t tell a whole lot….

Need advice from the experts please!
The video seems to guide you in their method.

I wouldn't do it that way, but in the absence of a router it looks like it would work.
 

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Bob - what tools do you have or have access to do something like this ?
is the top of the table removable or do you have a lot of room to do this ??
if there is room, I would use a hand-held router with a 3/4" bottom bit.
that would be very accurate and you could get down to where the wood
is 1/16 - 1/8" thick without the fear of breaking through the top.
it would be worth your effort to check your neighborhood to find someone with a router.

.
 

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ax and a pry bar would work about as well - hand held hole saw with no center point used as a wood excavator . . .



if that's the only stuff available, I'd use multiple diameter hole saws to concentric circles and bash out the chips with a screwdriver.


the proper approach would be a Forstner bit
 

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where's my table saw?
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There are many ways to do this ....

The method shown in the video "works" but to an experienced woodworker, it's not the best approach or the one I would choose. As shown the hole saw doesn't cut a "hole" unless you go all the way through, which you don't want to do. It does cut a circular slot, however. That slot cleanly defines the outside of the recess, but then you need to remove the center using a large drill like a Forstner or spade drill OR a hand chisel OR free hand a smaller hole saw which is the most dangerous. A spade drill would be the cheapest and safest.


:vs_cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Hi guys, thanks so much for all the replies and recommendations!

I have a hand drill, so I think something that can attach onto the drill would be the option I'd like to go with since it's simply drilling thru and letting the bit take care of the boring.

The spade bit looks easier to use. My concern is I don't think the spade bit would work because my table is only 1/2". The spade bit would probably cut through the wood before even making a circle... I'm looking to only cut into 5mm of the table...

Are there cheap alternatives to using spade bit, and then I could use a rotary rasp to enlarge the hole to 3" in diameter?
 

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Hi guys, thanks so much for all the replies and recommendations!

I have a hand drill, so I think something that can attach onto the drill would be the option I'd like to go with since it's simply drilling thru and letting the bit take care of the boring.

The spade bit looks easier to use. My concern is I don't think the spade bit would work because my table is only 1/2". The spade bit would probably cut through the wood before even making a circle... I'm looking to only cut into 5mm of the table...

Are there cheap alternatives to using spade bit, and then I could use a rotary rasp to enlarge the hole to 3" in diameter?
One cheap, quick and dirty way to control depth while removing material would be drilling a bunch of individual holes while having a stop collar on a standard twist drill bit. Set depth to the POINT of the drill.

Mark out the area you wish removed. Clamp the collar to the desired depth and drill away. Then clean up using the rotary rasp, being careful to NOT go deeper than what you previously drilled.

Like I said, cheap and dirty, gets the job done, but a router would be the preferred method.
 

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Why do you need a hole? If this location is under the table, why not just fasten to the table without a hole?


A 1/2" thick table top is on the thin side.



George
 

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Why do you need a hole? If this location is under the table, why not just fasten to the table without a hole?


A 1/2" thick table top is on the thin side.



George
George,

He is installing a hidden charging pad. The charging pad is not powerful enough to penetrate 1/2 inch of material. The charging pad must be located much closer to the face of the table.

From another source;

How thin does the surface have to be to ensure that the charger works properly when making a hidden installation?

answer

The surface has to be 1mm or less in thickness for the charger to work correctly.
 

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George,

He is installing a hidden charging pad. The charging pad is not powerful enough to penetrate 1/2 inch of material. The charging pad must be located much closer to the face of the table.

From another source;

How thin does the surface have to be to ensure that the charger works properly when making a hidden installation?

answer

The surface has to be 1mm or less in thickness for the charger to work correctly.

Thanks. I have no knowledge of charging pads.


I WOULD NOT attempt to get wood down to 1mm thickness with hand held tools.



George
 

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Thanks. I have no knowledge of charging pads.


I WOULD NOT attempt to get wood down to 1mm thickness with hand held tools.



George
That's why a router has strongly been the recommended choice. If hand tools are the only available option, yes it can be done. A quick look around will reveal many many objects and projects done solely with hand tools that are amazing.
 

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where's my table saw?
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A 1/16" thickness?

If the best thickness for conductivity is only 1/16" , I would just make the hole clean through and put a "plug" in it. It's way too thin, and if you screw up, now you have much bigger issue with splinters and grain matching. The plug can be wood, plastic, metal what ever works and looks best. That's what I would do.



If the charger itself looks good facing up, then just make it flush with the desk top and be done with it...... :vs_cool:
 
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As is often the case, the most "elegant" look is not always the most practical. Guess that is why many folks have both, "fine" china and "everyday" china or dishware.

Here is a good video for anyone interested.

 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hey everyone,

I tested with putting regular printing paper between my phone and the charging pad, and it works up to about 7mm so that's the table thickness I'd like to retain. The wood is beech so it's supposed to be hardwood and pretty solid? So perhaps 7mm on a 3" diameter wouldn't be so bad as this is a computer table and not much weight would be put on it?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hey Dave, do you suggest just using regular drill bits and making a bunch smaller holes (or holes big enough to fit a rotary rasp) and then just use the rasp to file away? Of course attaching the drill stopper to control depth when using both the rasp and the drill bit.
 

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I watched the essential part of the video. I noticed that the people in the video did not wear eye protection or a dust mask.

In my opinion, the reason their hole saw method works is because the table top is made of particle board with a plastic laminate top. The particle board is relatively soft and chips away fairly easily, and the plastic laminate will resist breaking or punching through as long as you are careful.

What material is @boba8523's table top? If it is wood or wood veneer, then the hole saw method is likely to fail. The wood grain can easily grab and tear out.

I agree with the others that now is a good time for Boba to invest in a router.

If the table top is wood or wood veneer, then here is another suggestion. I would appreciate comments and advice from others regarding efficacy and safety of this method. It is risky:

-> Wear eye protection and a dust mask!

If Boba insists on using a handheld electric drill, then consider using a 3 or 3-1/2 inch Forstner bit. Be sure that the shank isn't too large for your drill (3/8 inch? 1/2 inch?). Use a light touch once the hole is started. Be very patient. Let the Forstner bit scrape a tiny bit away, then stop and let the bit cool. Repeat. Be extra careful as you drill - if the bit grabs, the gun can snap around quickly and hurt your wrist or some other part of you. Take frequent, precise measurements all around the edge to make sure you are drilling straight and the bottom is flat.

When you get close, you should start testing your charger to see if it works. Go only as deep as necessary for a reliable charge.

If you get really close, you may want to use a metal file to remove the sharp tip of the Forstner bit so that it won't punch through. The walls of the hole would guide the drill.

What do others think of the concept?
 

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I agree with the others that now is a good time for Boba to invest in a router.

If the table top is wood or wood veneer, then here is another suggestion. I would appreciate comments and advice from others regarding efficacy and safety of this method. It is risky:

-> Wear eye protection and a dust mask!

If Boba insists on using a handheld electric drill, then consider using a 3 or 3-1/2 inch Forstner bit. Be sure that the shank isn't too large for your drill (3/8 inch? 1/2 inch?). Use a light touch once the hole is started. Be very patient. Let the Forstner bit scrape a tiny bit away, then stop and let the bit cool. Repeat. Be extra careful as you drill - if the bit grabs, the gun can snap around quickly and hurt your wrist or some other part of you. Take frequent, precise measurements all around the edge to make sure you are drilling straight and the bottom is flat.

When you get close, you should start testing your charger to see if it works. Go only as deep as necessary for a reliable charge.

If you get really close, you may want to use a metal file to remove the sharp tip of the Forstner bit so that it won't punch through. The walls of the hole would guide the drill.

What do others think of the concept?
Boba8523 has stated that he believes the wood to be Beech. Due to a lack of better tools, I'll conclude that Boba8523 is not very experienced with woodworking power tools.

As for an inexperienced wood worker using the method you suggest, I'll offer this video with special attention to the info starting at the 3:40 minute mark.
 

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In the interest of safety,,,,,,,,,,, both for the table top AND the operator, I might suggest you call your local tool rental center. My local DIY rental center, rents woodworking routers for a mere $16.00 per day. You might also check your local big box or lumber yard or hardware store for rental tools.

Using a router will provide a positive depth control. Many online videos to demonstrate how to use a basic router for the inexperienced operator.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Forestner bits are very expensive...

I really like the drill bit + drill bit stopper method and then using rasp to enlarge the hole.

Reason I like this is because I've drilled holes before when attaching this Beech tabletop to the legs, so it's just a matter of poking a few holes to make a big enough circle for the rasp to fit in.and by using the drill bit stopper,that essentially controls the depth of the boring.

I am thinking this rasp piece since the bottom shouldn't eat into the woods, thus wouldn't dig deeper into the wood?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Drill-America-1-4-in-x-1-in-Cylindrical-Solid-Carbide-Burr-Rotary-File-Bit-with-1-4-in-Shank-DULSA1A/306205287
 
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