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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all! So I have been working with this board that I jointed together, and after starting to plane I noticed that there were several of these "holes" (not sure what the technical term is here) along the board. As I planned across the board, they would close up in some spots, but in others it was a lot harder to get them to go away, even with thicker shavers. So my question is, is it possible to use my hand planes to get rid of these holes in the wood, and would it be advisable? I have a Jointer, no.5, and no.4 at my disposal to use. I can add more information as needed but not sure what else to include for now. Thanks all!
Brown Wood Flooring Varnish Plank

Brown Wood Amber Flooring Floor
 

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Those "holes", actually channels, are made by some grub, larvae. They may persist throughout your board. You'll be doing lots of hand planing, lots of work, if you elect to shave the boards by hand. As to further advice for remedy, it might be good to know what the project is.

Sonny
 

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Yup, powder post or borer beetle larval damage. If you look on the edge you will see little holes. Personally I never use any wood that shows signs of damage, even it it looks old, you never know. The reason I never use it is b/c borers can emerge as adults up to 4 years later. I've actually had this happen to me.

I recommend you check your wood storage for little piles of sawdust, this indicates an active infection. The only cure is heat - either kiln drying or the burn pile.

I bought some poplar boards from a sawmill, and since they had a kiln I assumed it was kiln dried. I built a corner cabinet using that poplar for the door frames. 2 1/2 years later, borer holes started to appear. A call to the sawmill, and no, you pay "extra for kiln drying".

So if you're using air dried lumber - always be vigilant. I think this depends some on your geographical location. I know I will never buy air dried lumber that's been sitting around very long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yup, powder post or borer beetle larval damage. If you look on the edge you will see little holes. Personally I never use any wood that shows signs of damage, even it it looks old, you never know. The reason I never use it is b/c borers can emerge as adults up to 4 years later. I've actually had this happen to me.

I recommend you check your wood storage for little piles of sawdust, this indicates an active infection. The only cure is heat - either kiln drying or the burn pile.

I bought some poplar boards from a sawmill, and since they had a kiln I assumed it was kiln dried. I built a corner cabinet using that poplar for the door frames. 2 1/2 years later, borer holes started to appear. A call to the sawmill, and no, you pay "extra for kiln drying".

So if you're using air dried lumber - always be vigilant. I think this depends some on your geographical location. I know I will never buy air dried lumber that's been sitting around very long.
Thanks DrRobert. I had no idea this was a thing. The wood came from Home Depot, and I didn't really do much examination of the board besides looking for twist. I will have to be more selective in the future!
 

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Be careful how you get rid of those "holes." If you just work around each spot where they are located you will wind up with a board that is not flat. The same amount of material must be taken off the entire board as it takes to remove each of those channels.l

If you have just recently bought this lumber I would take it back and get some that is not damaged.

George
 

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If you just keep planeing out all of those larva holes and grooves, you just might end up with a piece of veneer.
I dont know much about kiln drying but I would expect HD's kiln dried lumber to have twice the moisture content as furniture grade kiln dried lumber. I know in furniture grade stuff, the temp is high enough and held long enough to kill the bugs and larvae. I would suspect that construction grade lumber would go through at least enough temperature and time to kill anything also due to a major liability in the housing industry.
So back to some one else's question - how ling ago did you buy this and have you seen any sawdust?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I didn't notice any saw dust around the lumber or any other lumber in my garage. I got the board around a week ago. I will admit that I got this lumber off of the cull pile at home depot, but until today I was totally unaware about the potential for bugs to be inside the wood. I got rid of that board and will be starting from scratch, just to be safe.
Just curious for anyone to answer, do you usually find a noticeable difference in quality between wood bought at a local lumber yard vs home depot? That board came from home depot so I figured this might be a good opportunity to explore the local lumber yards around me.
 

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There are two types of lumberyards near me. One type specializes in servicing the construction industry. They carry typical dimensioned lumber - SPF (white wood - spruce, pine, or fir, you guess which) and plywoods, chipboard, etc. The other type sells hardwoods and specialized lumber to woodworkers, furniture and cabinet makers, etc. That second type does not carry much construction lumber, if any.

Home Depot sells mostly construction type lumber, but they also carry a few overpriced, low quality boards of domestic hardwoods like oak and maple.

Construction lumber is low cost, but moisture levels are typically higher than hardwoods, and construction lumber tends to twist, cup, warp, etc. It can also contain high levels of sap that can gum up your tools, burn more, and require more frequent blade cleaning. I still use construction lumber, mostly leftovers from building projects. We buy it at a local family-owned lumberyard, not Home Depot.

In my opinion, construction lumber from the local lumberyards suck. Construction lumber from Home Depot is even suckier.
 
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