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Hey guys,

I'm looking to include some knots/inclusions in some box lid panels. Does a clear epoxy leave a nice clean look in a knot that you want to highlight? I've not used epoxy as a filler before.

These will be lid panels that include some of my Dad's old squadron coins (523rd Crusaders)

Thanks!
 

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Epoxy is a good hole/gap filler. Turners use this in some pieces which have holes.

Clear epoxy will show the colour of the bottom of the hole, which looks dark. Some folks mix pigment to get a similar colour to the stain, or a contrasting colour.

If you decide to mix pigments, best to do a test to ensure the pigment does not prevent the epoxy from curing. Most do not, but I recall trying this once and my epoxy did not seem to like the pigment.

I have read of folks using coffee grinds as pigment. Something so they do not see the "hole".

I would mask around the hole as best you can so the epoxy does not get into the grain of surrounding wood, which will prevent any staining.
 

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ll

YES.

I filled some knot holes in a window shelf I built, and yes the epoxy drys clear and you can see right thru the hole on my shelf. When sanding it to get it flush, it will be all dull and not transparent, first coat of poly took care of that and it is totally clear.
 

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I use (lots) clear epoxy on turnings and my finish has an oil component to it--no problem.
Dave H
 

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Thanks guys. My usual box finish is Danish Oil. Epoxy won't absorb that, so should I consider a wiping varnish, laquer, poly...?


Yes, you should consider a surface building finish. Epoxy makes a great knot filler, but after leveling, it will show a distinctly different sheen the the surrounding oil finish if you use oil.

As for epoxy, I've been using thin, penetrating epoxy and just pouring it into the knot. Bubbles escape more easily from the thin stuff. The warmth from a light bulb, will also help draw the bubbles to the surface. You want to try to get all the bubbles out, otherwise they make little voids after you sand.
 
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