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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, this is my first post.... I've searched the forum but I haven't really come across the right info and was hoping to get some details here.

I'm in the process of building a 90g aquarium and I would like the front doors to be flush. I think drawer slides will work well and help maintain the inner cabinet space.

My only problem is the the thickness of the slides. Would routing the inside of the doors to compensate for the thickness be wise?

I was also considering offsetting the top/front beam to compensate... but I don't want to sacrifice stability just to hide a 1/2" gap....

anyone have any thoughts?

Thanks


EDIT:
Blue - Plywood
Green - Pine
Brown - 2x4s
Grey - Drawer Slides



Something like this is what I was thinking. Full extension/Ball Bearing.
28 inches long x 1.75 inches wide x 0.5 inches thick
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·



Drawer slides would not IMO, be a choice for a sliding door. There are many choices for sliding door hardware to fit your needs.​


Any Examples? I cant seem to find hardware other than typical ones that need the doors to be inset. I also would like the doors to open fully and not have to overlap like typical sliding doors. I just don't know what any of the hardware is called.

Thanks​
 

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Any Examples? I cant seem to find hardware other than typical ones that need the doors to be inset. I also would like the doors to open fully and not have to overlap like typical sliding doors. I just don't know what any of the hardware is called.

Thanks
For any non inset sliding door, a control track would have to be ahead of the cabinet to not look inset. There are several types that use mortised rollers/sheaves to ride on a narrow track...here is one. KV has a sheave that gets mortised in the bottom edge of a door. In any case, there has to be an upper and lower control factor. You could though use a trolley type roller assembly that can be used with just the top roller assembly.






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I don't see anything wrong with using drawer slide as door slides. The door will never weigh as much as the contents of a drawer can. If you recess them into the back of the doors make sure you've left enough thickness for screws to hold them in place.
 

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I don't see anything wrong with using drawer slide as door slides. The door will never weigh as much as the contents of a drawer can. If you recess them into the back of the doors make sure you've left enough thickness for screws to hold them in place.
So...you have done it?




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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't see anything wrong with using drawer slide as door slides. The door will never weigh as much as the contents of a drawer can. If you recess them into the back of the doors make sure you've left enough thickness for screws to hold them in place.
That was my initial thought. The doors will only weigh a few pounds compared to the 100+ that the slides are rated for.

I was considering some sort of trolley rig. But I'm not sure how the doors could open as far.
 

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What would you mount it to and how would you mount it becomes the question. It would be pretty difficult to mount in the fully closed position, no?
 

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So...you have done it?
I've used two slides on one side of a tall drawer in a PC cabinet where I needed the other side open for access. My students have done assorted short and tall cabinets over the years using the OP's idea. Always very impressive to see.

4D
 

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I've used two slides on one side of a tall drawer in a PC cabinet where I needed the other side open for access. My students have done assorted short and tall cabinets over the years using the OP's idea. Always very impressive to see.

4D
Full extension slides are designed for vertical loads. Installing on one side begs for bearing failure. While the slides appear and feel like they are captive, when extended, allows for movement. If one slide was used at the top, the door wouldn't hang straight without some type of bottom guide.

With the design provided by the OP, there would have to be a front apron/valence to cover the cabinet member when the door is extended on the slide. The hardware will show. There is sliding door hardware that is more discrete, and designed for the application of two doors to slide on one track.






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