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Discussion Starter #1
I just got into using a router not too long ago, and have done a couple projects using clamped custom jigs with no problems. Now I'm interested in getting a little fancy and need to put a roman ogee on a small piece of wood for a business card holder. I read somewhere that an edge guide would be helpful. I now have a DeWalt DW618 and I bought the matching edge guide. I've tried looking around the web and cannot find the rather basic instructions I need to proceed.

I just can't get it straight in my mind. If I use the metal fence at the end of the edge guide, and put the shoe of the guide up against my bench table, then the bottom of my router would be too high to line up with small piece I want to edge. Can somebody point me to a site or explain how I would go about setting this up? I, also don't understand why I would need the fine adjustment on an edge guide. Do I need some kind of fence or board to hold the router at the correct level? I just can't figure out how to accomplish with the tools I have available.

Maybe I'm just stupid, but I can't figure it out. There's just got to be more involved than the router and the edge guide. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have the bit with a bearing. So, I just clamp my piece down and run up the side? How do I keep the router straight up. Won't it tend to fall down on the side away from the cut?
 

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Old School
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I have the bit with a bearing. So, I just clamp my piece down and run up the side? How do I keep the router straight up. Won't it tend to fall down on the side away from the cut?
If the piece is small, you might want to run the profile on a longer piece and then just cut to size. If on the table, make a jig to hold the piece if you have to.




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A word of warning on putting an ogee on a small part; I have used one a couple of times with the same router incidentally, and end up with some pretty good tear out on the "corner" (my workpiece was oval, which was really the cause of my problems) and shot it across the shop a couple of times. In my very limited experience light passes with an ogee bit are a must.
 

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John
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I have the bit with a bearing. So, I just clamp my piece down and run up the side? How do I keep the router straight up. Won't it tend to fall down on the side away from the cut?
Sounds to me like your main issue is with the size of the stock you are trying to route. Like c-man said, the bearing on the bit controls the depth of cut so an edge guide or fence is not necessary. A small piece like that is easier done on a router table but can be done hand. The problem will be securing the stock. Once that is done, you will need a method of balancing the router. That can be done by securing additional stock, equal the thickness of the workpiece next to the workpiece effectively increasing the platform for the router to ride on. That scrap can either be against the edge of the workpiece opposite where the profile is going or spaced far enough from the workpiece to allow the bit to pass and near enough to support the router base.
Good Luck:smile:
 

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+1 on putting a piece of equal thickness behind the piece you are trying to route. If it is still unstable, you could even put another piece of equal thickness on the other side. Just make sure you space the second piece far enough away so that the bit doesn't contact it.

Like it was said earlier, this would be easier on a much longer piece, and on a router table, but is perfectly doable without either.

Let us know how it turns out!
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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You have to think of a router edge guide as substitute for the fence on a router table. The disadvantage, obviously, is that with a table it is safer/easier to hold and control small pieces with push pads.

From your description, attempting to route small pieces with a hand held router is extremely dangerous. I would build a router table, even a makeshift one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yep, the size of the piece is the problem. It's about 2 1/2 in. x 5 in. I just don't have a clamp that will secure this and give en0ugh space to bring the bit into the edge without interfering with the base. So it appears to be router table time
 

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John
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Yep, the size of the piece is the problem. It's about 2 1/2 in. x 5 in. I just don't have a clamp that will secure this and give en0ugh space to bring the bit into the edge without interfering with the base. So it appears to be router table time
It would have been easier if you had just routed the center section of a piece about 10" long and then trimmed it to length but it can still be done.
Clamping doesn't mean that a clamp has to be in contact with the piece, just that the piece is immobilized. I would do something like this: surround the workpiece with thin scrap material, usually 1/4" MDF (I keep a coffee can full of various length scraps of the stuff) and use a 23 gauge pin nailer to tack those down right to the workbench. Doesn't need to be a pin nailer, carpet tape, hot glue or even longer strips that can be clamped out of the way of the router will work. Just need to make sure the bearing retainer screw will clear the restraining cleats.
I don't want to talk you out of building a router table though, adds a whole new dimension to the capabilities of the little rascal.:smile:
 
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