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Accomplished Woodworker
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought it was going to be a snap but then with everything in place, not sure how to proceed.

I am mounting a steel plate onto my reloading bench flush to a depth of 7/16".

I just have a router, not a plunge router. The plate I outlined as in this video but now wondering how necessary is this?

My bright idea now is to get a Forstner bit make a good enough hole perhaps at depth and set my router bit to half the depth and do it a layer at a time?

Any better way to do this?

VIDEO:
 

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where's my table saw?
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Yes, there is a "better" way. Because there is no support in the center of the perimeter guides, the router tips in and makes the depth vary inaccurate.
Put a 1" wide support down the center and rout away the material on either side, leaving the center strip for last.
 
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A cat made me do it.
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My bright idea now is to get a Forstner bit make a good enough hole perhaps at depth and set my router bit to half the depth and do it a layer at a time?
When drilling a starter hole for routing make the hole generously larger than the router bit. A diameter at least 1/4" and more like 1/2" bigger, I'd go a little deeper too.

The reason, when you start routing you don't want the bit touching wood until the bit is up to speed, and then on the side of hole that you intend. When the router starts it's likely to move a little etc, if it touches the wood it will tend to start running around the hole, not fun and potentially dangerous.

I have a terrible memory, I forget the details, there wasn't blood, but there was "(&#$^! don't do that again" lol.
 

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When drilling a starter hole for routing make the hole generously larger than the router bit. A diameter at least 1/4" and more like 1/2" bigger, I'd go a little deeper too.

The reason, when you start routing you don't want the bit touching wood until the bit is up to speed, and then on the side of hole that you intend. When the router starts it's likely to move a little etc, if it touches the wood it will tend to start running around the hole, not fun and potentially dangerous.

I have a terrible memory, I forget the details, there wasn't blood, but there was "(&#$^! don't do that again" lol.
That's good advice, Bob. However in this case the recess starts from the edge of the bench, so no need for a starter hole.
Just set the bit to 1/2 the required depth and go about removing the material. Then reset the depth to 1/32" from full depth and repeat.
Finally, make your last path at full depth, removing that last 1/32" of material.
If you want, you can either rout away the remaining 1" support strip, OR hand chisel it away.
 

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That's good advice, Bob. However in this case the recess starts from the edge of the bench, so no need for a starter hole.
Yeah that confused me when looking at the photo, looked like he could just start from the edge. But I wanted to make that point about the starter hole size.

But that's a YouTube video and maybe @vdotmatrix will have the plate away from the edge?

Depending on the situation you don't need a Forstner bit for a starter hole, a brad point and even a twist bit should work, if wide enough.

Which router bit, what size are you thinking of using?
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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I did a similar operation a long time ago to inset sacrificial inserts and drum sander plates in my drill press table. I used a flat bottom bit in a trim router with a larger base added to give more surface area to steady the router. I worked from one side of the recess to the other. Had I been doing multiples of this, I would have made a template and used template guides in the router base. Since it was a one off, I just took my time free handing things.
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wow! a 6 minute video on how not to do it... he was all over the place and dipping

the easy way would be measure the distance from the bit to the edge of the base and place the guide frame that distance away from the recess you're routing. i did a similar recess in corian for diamond sharpening plates. just leave a strip down the center so the router doesn't dip and pop it out later with a chisel

frame setup, since it was corian i used a 1/4" solid carbide upcut bit.
frame is set out the distance from the edge of the bit to the edge of the router base

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finished corian base with 3 diamond plates

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Accomplished Woodworker
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
wow! a 6 minute video on how not to do it... he was all over the place and dipping

the easy way would be measure the distance from the bit to the edge of the base and place the guide frame that distance away from the recess you're routing. i did a similar recess in corian for diamond sharpening plates. just leave a strip down the center so the router doesn't dip and pop it out later with a chisel

frame setup, since it was corian i used a 1/4" solid carbide upcut bit.
frame is set out the distance from the edge of the bit to the edge of the router base

View attachment 438712

finished corian base with 3 diamond plates

View attachment 438713
You know-I did just that, I had framed it out and used the ring as a guide (2.5”). Then I had to make collar for the router and use the frame to keep the blade cutting on the same plane. I measured a fornster bit and found the one that a 5/16” hole (measured actual distance) and used circles as starting points. Did it two complicated layers, using an brad nailer to carefully construct and deconstruct router supports around the project. It took a long tile form me.
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You know-I did just that, .... It took a long tile form me.
nope. you totally misunderstood my post. i did nothing like you did.

i measured from the bit to the edge of the router base
then i spaced the fence guides that distance from the recess
set the router depth and routed the recess
the whole process took me 15 minutes, cuz i work slow

no guide bushings, no drilling, no pattern bits
definitely no modifications to the router

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Vdot, I think you over thinked this!
The most important part of routing to a consistent depth is proper support of the router base.
There are two easy solutions, the first being a very large base attached to the factory base made of 1/4 ot or thin plywood to span between the supports.
That adds addition length for the bit to protrude from the collet, however, a disadvantage.

The second is to use a "moveable support" within the perimeter so you can use the factory base without any additional thickness.
Establish the location of the moveable support by bumping the bit to the far left and sliding the support over until the base is fully supported.
Sticky tape it in place. Then repeat on the right side. You'll be left with a strip in the center still at full height to rout away last.
Now, you can make two additional support strips that sit in the recessed area and are flush with the original surrounding supports.

A bit of minor advice, I would have taken a belt sander to the top of my bench to make it more even and clean up the area around it before routing in my new plate.
 

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If you ask 10 woodworkers on a forum how to do something, you will get 11 answers. And everybody is convinced their way is best.
Maybe so, but you may also have 10 more educated woodworkers as a result. Having more ways to do something is a wonderful thing, not a liability.
That's what we do here, offer "individual approaches and methods" of solving the same issue. I am NOT convinced that "everyone" thinks they way is best having been here over a decade and learned from others as much as I have offered to them. There are some really talented folks here, even the newbies as well as the pros and members in general. I've seen it first hand. I won't name names because I would leave someone out and that wouldn't be right.
 

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I was agreeing with frank.
And I was disagreeing with your agreement! LOL
We are not a bunch of arrogant, self centered wise holes who always need to be right, thank God.
 
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