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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently watched a video by Kenbo (kennyearrings1) re: fretwork. In the video he mentioned using a jewelers drill. I would like to ask him a question about the jewelers drill but have not found a way to send him my question. I tried private message on this forum but i don't have permission. Hopefully he may see this post.


Thanks
 

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If you left click on the posters name/nick, a drop down menu will appear, click on the profile spot, a new window will open with a spot to send him a message.
 

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Pain in the A$$
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no1texan said:
I tried private message on this forum but i don't have permission. Hopefully he may see this post. Thanks
I believe that you have to have 25 posts on this forum before you can send PMs. If you give it a little bit of time, I'm sure Kenbo will see this thread.

Mark
 

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I recently watched a video by Kenbo (kennyearrings1) re: fretwork. In the video he mentioned using a jewelers drill. I would like to ask him a question about the jewelers drill but have not found a way to send him my question. I tried private message on this forum but i don't have permission. Hopefully he may see this post.


Thanks
Thanks for trying to contact me. You can always reach me be submitting a comment on any of my YouTube videos. I get email directly to my cell phone to let me know that a comment has been made. Of course, now that you have my attention, you can always ask your question right here on this thread.
 

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t would appear that we have 2 threads in motion about this same topic. Either way, I will do my best to explain the purpose of the jewellers drill. Due to the limitations of some drill presses, the upright post or mast at the rear of the drill press can get in the way of drilling entry holes in the centre of larger fretwork pieces. A jewellers drill is an excellent way to reach those areas without any worry of the drill press mast getting in your way. I usually drill all of the blade entry holes in an area of the cutting first, before taking the piece over to the scroll saw. Once I get it over to the saw, there have been times where I've noticed that I had missed drilling an entry hole or two. Instead of uprooting myself from the scroll saw, I use my jewellers drill to place an entry hole in the areas that I missed. Sometimes, when I am doing demonstrations at woodworking shows, there isn't an option to have a drill press as I just don't have the room for it. Again, the jewellers drill comes to the rescue with an easy way to drill entry holes with no need for electricity or extra floor space for the drill press. Some of the pieces that I cut have extremely small entry holes for the blades. The tiny bits needed to drill these holes do not fit in a conventional drill press chuck but the jewellers drill handles the tiny bits with ease. And lastly, a lot of the fretwork pieces that I cut, are extremely fragile and sometimes it is touch and go as to whether or not a piece will survive the saw. If they won't survive the saw, they definitely won't survive the drill press. The jewellers drill is a lot more forgiving when it comes to adding blade entry holes. The gentle drilling action of the jewellers drill doesn't break apart a delicate fretwork piece like a drill press would.
I hope that this clears up why I use the jewellers drill. I will post this response on the other thread as well, so that they both have the answer to the question.
By the way, the jewellers drill I use is this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Kenbo for your comments and time to provide lots of detail regarding the jeweler drill and your techniques. I have not done that much fretwork but what little I have done, always had problem with drilling in a small area with a regular drill. Over the next several weeks I plan to be doing a lot of fretwork and looking forward to doing better job with the smaller cutting areas. After 11 years in woodworking/intarsia/fretwork, it is amazing how much more there is to learn and how there is always a good 'saw dust' friend willing to share the how to.

Thanks again.
 
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