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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok guys.... My faceframes are complete!!... And now on to the boxes.... I am using 3/4 oak sides, tops and bottoms on my uppers.... B4 I cut anything I would like to know how u guys build them in reference to your faceframe.... I think I am going to put my boxes flush to the inside of the face frames.... This way I will always have a scribe but besides that what are the pros & cons? Also what about flush with the outside? Or just dead in the middle.... My FF are 2 1/4 wide...
 

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Since I'm not sure if there is a right or wrong way I usually build my cabinets first then build the face frame.

When I build the face frame I make it flush with the outside of the cabinet.
 

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Not sure of any pros or cons and since I'm self taught. I'm not really sure if I'm doing it right. For me it's easier to build the cabinet first then get the measurements for the face frame. I would rather screw up a small piece of hard wood then a bigger piece of plywood.
 

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When I fabricated with face frames, I would make the outside edge flush with the cabinet. If I needed a scribe, I would let the face frame protrude past the end, and the floor of the cabinetry would also run through and line up with the edge of the face frame.

It's been a while since I've incorporated face frames on a cabinet. I only use them if the work has to match existing cabinets, where the face frame shows, or there's a decorative carving on them. If overlay doors are used, they don't get seen. IMO, they are a waste of time and money.





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That depends as well on what hinges you use. Some wrap the inside of frame. My frames are 2.5" at top and 1.75 on the remaning sides.I awayls leave a 1/4" scribe, except on end cabinets which get a 3/4 scribe for the panel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
These are my first full set of cabinets.... They are shop cabinets but I'm building them just as I would for a kitchen.... I have 1000+ BF of red oak and that is why I started with the FF and now I am moving to the boxes.... I have not yet thought about hinges or drawer slides.... I know I want blumotion slides but that is as far as I've thought ahead.... I've seen it done this way but I'm not saying my way is correct .... Is there any drawbacks of doing it this way?
 

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I would go with a lesser scribe, otherwise you will have a huge gap between the cabinets. A narrower side face frame makes it easier to drive the screws between the two. But I always have hinges picked out first.
 

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Finished end = exposed visible end of a cabinet. If you flush the end stile of the face frame to the finished plywood end panel it's hard to get it perfect and usually requires some sanding and careful not to sand through the plywood veneer.

Another way to do this is to ease the edge of the plywood end panel and the back edge of the finished end stile of the face frame with a block sander. You will end up with a nice little "v" groove that does not need to be sanded.

Bret
 

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Cmac08 said:
These are my first full set of cabinets.... They are shop cabinets but I'm building them just as I would for a kitchen.... I have 1000+ BF of red oak and that is why I started with the FF and now I am moving to the boxes.... I have not yet thought about hinges or drawer slides.... I know I want blumotion slides but that is as far as I've thought ahead.... I've seen it done this way but I'm not saying my way is correct .... Is there any drawbacks of doing it this way?
Best off if you make sure you have all the sections hinged correctly before you run into a conflict. Such as swing and clearance. I only use face frames if someone beats me over the head with them.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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I have found that for openings that will have drawers, it is much easier if the face frames are flush with the edge of the opening. Then you can use normal slides (no need for the attachment to the back of the box or shimming out to the face frame edge).

Also, if you will have doors, some hinges require a certain overlap of the face frame. E.g. these
 

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Exactly

Not sure of any pros or cons and since I'm self taught. I'm not really sure if I'm doing it right. For me it's easier to build the cabinet first then get the measurements for the face frame. I would rather screw up a small piece of hard wood then a bigger piece of plywood.
It's like making a picture frame then trying to find a picture that will fit inside. I would never have thought to make the frames first, then the cabinets. It may be kind of a self checking method however.. if the frame isn't the correct size then you haven't messed up a lot of plywood in a wrong size box. What ever works best for Ya. :yes:
 

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Paarker.... Are there any pros or cons of doing it this way?.... Just curious
There is one major problem with making the carcase flush with the inside of the face frame. It becomes difficult to but two cabinets together. Or to place one cabinet flush against a wall.

I have never seen a face frame cabinet built like that.

George
 

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" You will end up with a nice little "v" groove that does not need to be sanded." from Lola

You can get a router bit that'll do it a bunch faster and cleaner.:thumbsup:
Bill
Ha! Almost sounds like a challenge. I'm talking a small
"v" groove here. A couple of swipes with a block sander happens pretty fast. If I wanted a deeper groove I'd use a router.:smile:

Bret
 
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