Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We recently had new knotty alder doors, case and base installed in our house, and have some unusual issues with the stain/lacquer finish. The case and base material was ordered with the doors, delivered to a local painter, stained, laquered and then delivered to our job site, where it was kept inside at room temperature. We had it finished first, since we were living in the remodel during construction.

The problem is with the case material, especially with areas around some of the knots turning white. The finish is beautiful on the doors and baseboards (first photo shows a typical knot), but about 50% of the case material looks like the second photo. This whitening and blanching of the finish seems to happen mostly around the knots.

This is something that was not apparent (or maybe just not noticed) when the material was finished and delivered, and seems to have gotten worse over the last several weeks (during installation).

Any ideas on what might cause this? I'm (probably naively) hoping we can fix this in place, since all the material is already up. If not, I'll have to replace the worst pieces with some new material...I just don't want to make the same mistake over again. Not sure if it's the material, the lacquer, a moisture issue or what...

I'm hoping someone has seen this before and can advise. Thanks ahead of time for any thoughts, ideas or suggestions.

-Dale
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
Its simply moisture trapped under the finish.

Try lightly wiping the surface with denatured alcohol. Use as little alcohol as possible; too much will damage the finish. May take a couple of times, but it should disappear....just be sure to take your time.

If that doesnt work, you can buy some "Blush Control" and spray it on the white areas.
https://issuu.com/touch-up_solution...og_9.0_web_rev22109_6_tp_/5?e=1151045/4578841
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,736 Posts
It could also be a chemical reaction between the stain and the finish if the stain wasn't allowed enough drying time. If that is the case then the finish could peal where the white spots are.

Do you happen to know what products were used for the stain and finish?
 

·
Sawing against the Wind
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
What are you cleaning it with???? There's not enough dust to been sitting in a remodel several weeks. IF I read correctly it must've not been there prior install or you (at least I) would not have put it up. Check your clean-up supplies.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tahoedale

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,736 Posts
The reason I asked about what supplies were used is if the doors were finished with a fast drying finish such as lacquer it can have a bad reaction with the linseed oil in the stain if the job was rushed and the stain not allowed to dry enough. It can turn white or orange just like what your picture shows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
We recently had new knotty alder doors, case and base installed in our house, and have some unusual issues with the stain/lacquer finish. The case and base material was ordered with the doors, delivered to a local painter, stained, laquered and then delivered to our job site, where it was kept inside at room temperature. We had it finished first, since we were living in the remodel during construction.

The problem is with the case material, especially with areas around some of the knots turning white. The finish is beautiful on the doors and baseboards (first photo shows a typical knot), but about 50% of the case material looks like the second photo. This whitening and blanching of the finish seems to happen mostly around the knots.

This is something that was not apparent (or maybe just not noticed) when the material was finished and delivered, and seems to have gotten worse over the last several weeks (during installation).

Any ideas on what might cause this? I'm (probably naively) hoping we can fix this in place, since all the material is already up. If not, I'll have to replace the worst pieces with some new material...I just don't want to make the same mistake over again. Not sure if it's the material, the lacquer, a moisture issue or what...

I'm hoping someone has seen this before and can advise. Thanks ahead of time for any thoughts, ideas or suggestions.

-Dale
I don't know anything about your particular problem but if you zoom in closely on the first pic (jpeg 1847) you can just make out some very tiny worm shapes. Maybe that could be a clue. Or maybe not. Just thought it interesting.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top