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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well it happened to me.

I have been a hobbiest/semi-pro wood worker for a long time and last week I made a fairly costly mistake. It was the end of the day and I must have been tired. I was ripping some stock on my table saw and BANG! That quick. There was no improper setup, not kickback, nothing... I just drug my left hand across the blade as I was shifting position to finish the cut.

I cut the tip off my middle finger through the bone and mangled the tip of my index finger. There was nothing to "recover", so they just did some stitching to tidy it up. I went to a hand surgeon at the suggestion of the ER doc., but no surgery is required (i guess there was some concern with a jagged bone edge).

I am one of those guys who catches a load of crap from "the boys" about taking shop safety too far although I have taken the kick back guard off my TS - it goes back on when I can get back to work, BTW.

It could have been so much worse! It will take 4-6 months to heal completely, and other than a "new look" they should be "99.5%" normal.



 

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table saw safety "rules"

Your hand never is directly in line with the blade...unless you are 24" away from it, even then make it a practice to be on one side or the other.

Your hand(s) never go beyond the front of the blade. The red zone on the throat plate means danger, stay away.

If you are not going to use the retracting type blade guard, and I don't, but I do use a blade "dust extraction" system that usually covers the blade, because I don't like getting sawdust spit back at my face..... then come up with some other arrangement to cover the blade.

Once you measure and set the fence and start cutting, the rest is just feeding, you don't need to actually see the blade cut. It's gonna do it's thing regardless whether you watch it or not. And if you have made an error in setting the fence, Oh Well, it's too late now anyway.

My dust sucker/blade cover can be tilted down to cover almost all of the blade except for the thickness of the stock:



Sorry to hear your misfortune, but you will recover and be more attentive in the future I'm sure. BTW, Most all my buddie's accident's were late at night, rushing a to finish a project.
 

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Screw said:
Well it happened to me.

I have been a hobbiest/semi-pro wood worker for a long time and last week I made a fairly costly mistake. It was the end of the day and I must have been tired. I was ripping some stock on my table saw and BANG! That quick. There was no improper setup, not kickback, nothing... I just drug my left hand across the blade as I was shifting position to finish the cut.

I cut the tip off my middle finger through the bone and mangled the tip of my index finger. There was nothing to "recover", so they just did some stitching to tidy it up. I went to a hand surgeon at the suggestion of the ER doc., but no surgery is required (i guess there was some concern with a jagged bone edge).

I am one of those guys who catches a load of crap from "the boys" about taking shop safety too far although I have taken the kick back guard off my TS - it goes back on when I can get back to work, BTW.

It could have been so much worse! It will take 4-6 months to heal completely, and other than a "new look" they should be "99.5%" normal.

http://s34.photobucket.com/user/Screwball100102/media/IMG_2205_zpsce925e03.jpg.html

http://s34.photobucket.com/user/Screwball100102/media/IMG_2209_zps1854a99a.jpg.html
Very sorry that happened to you. It is a good reminder for all table saw users though. Thanks for sharing it with us.
 

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I usually keep my blade guard off because I'm constantly removing my sled and putting it back on. This makes me want to just deal with the hassle. Hoping for a speedy recovery!
 

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Sorry about your accident Screw.

I hope for your speedy recovery and that this accident will be your last.
 

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If its gonna happen it looks like you made the best of it; since it wasn't the pads of your fingers do they think your sensation will be 100% once it heals back up? Speedy recovery to you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
thanks for the support guys! its healing really well and feeling better every day. the most frustrating part is having to stay out of the shop for a few weeks.

like i said, in the op, i'm a pretty safe guy that just got careless... and there is no room in the shop for careless.

i've heard tons of stories in the last week about guys who have had it much worse than me and i makes the just that much more grateful. i'll ultimately get back to normal and not everyone that drags their fingers over running table saw can say that.

thanks again!
 

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Sorry about your mishap and hope you recover completely. I have been lucky in over 50 years of woodworking. The worst cuts I ever had was with a utility knife with a new blade. My first training in woodworking was at the old Franklin High School woodshop on West Central and Union in 1955. Use your downtime to plan future projects and vow to NEVER do that again. Good Luck!
 

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Man, looking at those

pictures made a certain orifice on my body pucker up!!! How are you doing now? Can imagine it's probably still sore as all #ell still. There's no need for me to say be careful, I'm quite sure safety is imbedded in your mind big time.
Hope you a fast healing time and no permanent damage.
 

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I had similar damage to my right little finger, years ago. I has healed so well you can't tell it was ever damaged. You'll be fine, and wiser. Bless. :)
 

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Just had the same experience ,but not as bad,only with my right thumb.

Have taped a picture of it to saw guard as a reminder. Will have the stitches for one more week .
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
My fingers are getting exponentially better. I've been back in the shop for a couple of weeks, did a few rooms of 3 piece crown for a customer and working on a bathroom vanity now without any real issues.

Putting lots pressure on the finger nail beds still hurts a bit and every once in a while I'll graze them in just the "right" spot and it send me through the roof! But all in all they are recovering better and faster than I thought they would.

I have to say that the only tool I'm a little more wary around is the TS. I don't want to say nervous, but certainly more aware than a few weeks ago :)
 

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Sorry to hear about your injuries and glad you are getting better.

Many thanks for posting up, it serves as a reminder to all of us, to respect woodworking equipment and their dangers.
 
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